gduff2
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gduff2
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Joined: June 18th, 2005, 4:58 am

January 14th, 2006, 6:47 am #21

Fiskars hatchet- this is propably the sharpest blade in my house. I've never used a hatchet like it.
Shinto saw/rasp
block plane
smooth half round rasp
cleaver and SHARPENING tool- I have the wedge kind of sharpener. There's knack to sharpening this tool to be a scraper.
Quik grips and bench
open end wrenches-calipers
Garrett
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Thimosabv
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Thimosabv
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Joined: December 25th, 2005, 5:03 am

January 16th, 2006, 4:15 pm #22

Thans to all who responded. I have one more tool I enjoy. That is a lenth of deer thigh bone that i use to burnish the bows back and belly just prior to final finish application.
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Rod
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Rod
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Joined: June 17th, 2005, 11:07 pm

January 16th, 2006, 10:30 pm #23

I have two tactile favourites, one is an old sheep rib bookmaker's bone found in a box on the premises of a defunct bookbinding company in Clerkenwell, the other is a Lie Nielsen no. 212 cast bronze scraper plane.
But the tools I use most are a 12" Grobet half round cabinet makers rasp with a Python handle and an old gooseneck cabinet scraper.
For scraping bark off dogwood shoots and a variety of other small tasks nothing beats a suitably shaped chip of flint from the debris pile.
Rod.
It's meant to be simple, not easy.
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poekoelan
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poekoelan
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Joined: May 24th, 2005, 5:20 am

January 17th, 2006, 11:26 am #24

No one mentioned a ferriers rasp. I've tillered my last few bows with nothing but a ferriers rasp and a scraper. After roughing out ( I even use a ferriers rasp for "fine" roughing ) I begin tillering with this rasp. Once I have established some equal bend and limb movement, I turn it over and use the file side. As I approach draw length and draw weight, I switch to a scraper.

Am I alone on the ferriers rasp?
goodbye. hello
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Rod
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Rod
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Joined: June 17th, 2005, 11:07 pm

January 17th, 2006, 12:46 pm #25

I have a bunch of farrier's rasps but prefer the cabinet maker's rasp.
Rod.
It's meant to be simple, not easy.
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Marc St Louis
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Marc St Louis
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Joined: April 14th, 2004, 9:08 am

January 17th, 2006, 12:56 pm #26

I have a platters special, similar to a farriers. I only use it to rough out and then not all the time. It works well on wood with interlocking grains such as Elm and HHBMarc
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Guest
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January 17th, 2006, 1:02 pm #27

Probably one of the best tools for bow making IMO Austin. After band sawing I use a farrier rasp also, then a double-cut flat bastard and finish with a cabinet scraper. That puts me using 120 grit sandpaper and after that 180 grit. Finish with well worn 220 grit and burnish. -ART B PS, the rasp work very well in arrow-making too. On woods that won't take a block plane a farrier's rasp file side does the job.
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NorthShorelongbow
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NorthShorelongbow
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Joined: November 5th, 2005, 7:49 am

January 18th, 2006, 8:06 am #28

Poek,

I'm with you, ferrier rasp than scraper.


That's 50% of my tools



Manny
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Infrablue
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Infrablue
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Joined: March 3rd, 2006, 6:48 am

March 18th, 2006, 2:10 am #29

<whisper> Dremel </whisper>

Infy

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