What is the Archer's Paradox?

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What is the Archer's Paradox?

Rod
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Rod
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Joined: 17 Jun 2005, 23:07

02 Sep 2015, 12:22 #1

[font=ARIAL, 'SANS-SERIF']The term “the Archer’s Paradox” was coined because it was at the time not fully understood how an arrow might be aimed directly at a mark at full draw, be offset to the side at brace-height, but recover from the disruption of flexing caused by the loose and finally go where it had been pointed.[/font][font=ARIAL, 'SANS-SERIF']This was the paradox. [/font]

[font=ARIAL, 'SANS-SERIF']Flexing in paradox was not really understood in detail until the arrival of motion capture with photography and high-speed film.  Many of the illustrations accompanying attempts to explain the phenomenon of paradox are more fanciful than useful and have often tended to add to the confusion.[/font]

[font=ARIAL, 'SANS-SERIF']The old commonly quoted definition was that “the arrow bends around the bow and recovers to go where the bow was pointed” which always seemed foolish to me.

[/font][font=ARIAL, 'SANS-SERIF']Quite simply, when it is possible to produce a set-up capable of shooting an arrow (in lateral, left to right terms) exactly where it has been pointed at full draw, why would we even think of pointing the bow?

I[/font][font=ARIAL, 'SANS-SERIF']t seems to me far more natural in any case, to be aiming the arrow itself, since the bow is going nowhere and the straight length of the arrow so clearly lends itself to being pointed at a mark.[/font]

[font=ARIAL, 'SANS-SERIF']Within certain parameters it is quite practical to make a “primitive” bow which despite the offset created by the geometry of bow width and brace-height will be perfectly capable of shooting an arrow exactly where it has been pointed at full draw.[/font]

[font=ARIAL, 'SANS-SERIF']But there will have been many primitive cultures to which this idea might have seemed or even now still seem an un-necessary complication.

[/font][font=ARIAL, 'SANS-SERIF']This suggests other stories and other skills to consider, b[/font][font=ARIAL, 'SANS-SERIF']ut there has always been more than one way and though techniques vary, the common essentials remain unchanged.

Rod.[/font]

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Last edited by Rod on 02 Sep 2015, 12:28, edited 5 times in total.
It's meant to be simple, not easy.
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