Welcome to the New Forum!

PaleoAleo
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PaleoAleo
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Joined: April 14th, 2003, 9:09 pm

September 14th, 2010, 2:12 am #1

Hey fellow knappers.   I created this forum about an hour ago and have been moving discussions over that seem appropriate for this new area.  I'm moving as fast as I can through some old discussions, so it might be the case that some of what I moved here really doesn't fit here.  By the same token, I might be overlooking other discussions that should be in this new area.

I made a post on the General Flintknapping forum to see if this was a good idea.  In case you didn't see that post, I'll briefly reiterate that the idea is to set aside this forum for serious discussion about the science behind flintknapping, knapping theory, replication of knapping tools and ancient point types and methods.   These sorts of discussions have a way of quickly getting lost due to the great activity on the general forum!  So this will be a way to make these more scientific type discussions easier to find.

Also, some of the older discussions are missing photos (as i expected).   While that's a bummer, it doesn't necessarily kill the value of the discussion as much of what is written remains very useful information.   After I move a bunch over (I'm only back to page #21 or so), I'll take a closer look at the ones here to make sure all is Ok.

Bear with me as I search out the older discussions and move them here.  In the meanwhile, make yourselves at home and start new discussions in this area.

Tom Mills
Last edited by PaleoAleo on September 14th, 2010, 2:19 am, edited 1 time in total.
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badger5149
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badger5149
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Joined: June 3rd, 2005, 1:13 am

September 14th, 2010, 2:28 am #2

Tom, I think this is a great idea. I plan to start following it form the begaining here. I have to admit a fair amount of envy over you guys who make it look so easy. Maybe this will help me to get started. Thanks Steve
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Paleoknapperjim
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Paleoknapperjim
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Joined: May 30th, 2006, 10:23 am

September 14th, 2010, 2:06 pm #3

Thanks Tom,

It must take a lot of time to search back and move the relevant discussions. I'm already seeing several topics I want to go back and re-read. There is valuable information available to all.

Your efforts at maintaining this forum are truly appreciated.....jim
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PaleoAleo
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PaleoAleo
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Joined: April 14th, 2003, 9:09 pm

September 14th, 2010, 2:18 pm #4

Yea, there's some great stuff back in there Jim! It's kind of like digging knapping stone...never know what great jewel will turn up on the next page!

Thanks for your kind words too my friend.

Tom
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Woodland Roamer
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Woodland Roamer
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Joined: November 9th, 2005, 3:34 am

September 14th, 2010, 8:22 pm #5

Thanks a lot for your effort to do this Tom. This is going to be a great addition.

Alan
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jeanne binning
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jeanne binning
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Joined: May 5th, 2007, 12:19 am

January 20th, 2012, 1:26 am #6

The Art and Science of Flintknapping

February 24, 25, and 26, 2012
California Desert Studies Center (ZZYZX)
[]http://biology.fullerton....f/courses2010winter.pdf]


This is a weekend learning experience for those who want to make stone tools and understand the waste products of the reduction process. This anthropology class is taught by Dr. Jeanne Day Binning and Charles (Chuck) Bouscaren at the California State University Desert Studies Center (ZZYZX) near Baker, California. Students stay in a dormitory setting and five cafeteria-style meals are provided.* The class is $325.00 per person or $610.00 per couple and starts at 7:00 PM on Friday evening and ends early Sunday afternoon. Most of the class time is spent doing hands-on activities; lectures occur on Friday and Saturday evenings. The class is limited to 23 students.

Each participant has the opportunity to haft what he or she manufactures (arrow point, dart point, or knife). Planned activities include heat treatment of silicious rocks, basic percussion biface reduction, basic pressure flaking (including notching), the use of an atlatl, and the use of a single-stave, self bow. Groundstone manufacture is also covered. Rock samples and different types of debitage are available for students to study during the class.

For more information, call (951) 827-5801 (University of California, Riverside Extension). Also, potential participants can register for the class by calling (951) 827-4105 or (800) 442-4990 or online at the UCR Extension website: http://www.extension.ucr.edu/schedule/index.html.

Dr. Binning can be reached at 559-301-7707 if there are additional questions.
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desertdigger
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desertdigger
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Joined: February 13th, 2015, 3:38 pm

February 13th, 2015, 5:43 pm #7

Looking forward to reading! I had the good fortune to study and discuss the lithic assemblage at a number of sites in San Diego county, a long time ago, when I was in school....
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