Waterproofing pottery

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Waterproofing pottery

Aeonir
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Aeonir
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Joined: 21 Oct 2017, 21:17

25 Oct 2017, 08:26 #1

Is burnishing enough to make bowls hold liquid, or are there other techniques needed?

I started with pottery at a artsclub a month or 2 ago and they bought an oven 2 weeks ago so i can finally bake my pottery. (I'm the only member doing pottery, most of them are painters)

Just some pictures of early works i made on a wheel, and glazed:

And one of the first 2 pinch pots i made, (started yesterday): the small thing in the bottom of the photo is supposed to be a spoon.


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Bill Skinner
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Bill Skinner
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05 Jan 2018, 18:28 #2

A lot of how porous your pot will be depends on the clay you start with.  I use natural dug clays from here in the southeastern US, I notice that each clay is different from the others.

Burnishing will help some, using the pot or cup will also help stop the clay from being porous.  As you use the pot, it will absorb some of the oils and minerals in the liquids and eventually seal itself up.  Some will only take one or two uses, some will take four or five.
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Aeonir
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Aeonir
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05 Jan 2018, 20:05 #3

The next pinch pots are going to be used after baking. Lets see if i can make usable bowls

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Quillsnkiko
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Quillsnkiko
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06 Jan 2018, 00:43 #4

Cool.... Keep us posted on your Progress. Quills
" You can't stop the waves .... but, you can learn to surf."
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Bill Skinner
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Bill Skinner
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06 Jan 2018, 01:38 #5

Use a piece of mussel shell or gourd to scrape the inside of your pinch pot to smooth out the high places when it is not quite leather hard.  And then scrape the outside with something that conforms to the curve of the pot.  Gourd is good but I have used  split river cane. Then burnish.  I use a flat rock, the smoother. the better. And larger is usually better than smaller, so you have something to hold on to.  Burnish the inside, too.  
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river rat
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river rat
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08 Jan 2018, 07:03 #6

 ive never glazed a pottery piece of mine. only used burnishing if i want it shiny otherwise why? they all hold water and can be used to cook with. last a long time. it takes more time to process the raw clay than it does to make and fire the piece in a fire pit.theres a lot to pottery , especially more primitive pottery. i like your pottery. the more you try it, the more you study the better it will become as well. good luck.
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Larry Moniz
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Larry Moniz
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08 Jan 2018, 15:40 #7

Never done pottery, but somewhere in the distant past I recall reading that pottery MUST be glazed if it is to be used for consumables such as food and water.  The reasoning was that such items will retain tiny amounts of the contents in unglazed pottery.  Those contents apparently can become toxic and cause serious illness.  I did a bit of research and found this article that will explain it far better than I can.  Suggest you also to more specific Google searches based on your wider knowledge of pottery.  Hope this helps:  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ceramic_glaze
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blancoh0
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blancoh0
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08 Jan 2018, 16:28 #8

Larry Moniz wrote: Never done pottery, but somewhere in the distant past I recall reading that pottery MUST be glazed if it is to be used for consumables such as food and water.  The reasoning was that such items will retain tiny amounts of the contents in unglazed pottery.  Those contents apparently can become toxic and cause serious illness.  I did a bit of research and found this article that will explain it far better than I can.  Suggest you also to more specific Google searches based on your wider knowledge of pottery.  Hope this helps:  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ceramic_glaze

Hey Larry, thanks for this inf. I bought a nice tae pot and cup set a while back. When I got home I noticed a small  unglazed area inside , about the size of a quarter. I wanted to use it for tea, but was afraid to get toxins from the unglazed spot. So I never used it. I would want to put very hot water into it with a mesh tea ball to make tea. Is there any way that I can fix this ? Glue, paint or such ? 
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blancoh0
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blancoh0
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08 Jan 2018, 16:29 #9

Need to fix an unglazed spot in a ceramic  teapot. Anyone know a quick fix that will stand close to boiled water for tea. Thank.
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Larry Moniz
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08 Jan 2018, 22:23 #10

blancoh0 wrote:
Larry Moniz wrote: Never done pottery, but somewhere in the distant past I recall reading that pottery MUST be glazed if it is to be used for consumables such as food and water.  The reasoning was that such items will retain tiny amounts of the contents in unglazed pottery.  Those contents apparently can become toxic and cause serious illness.  I did a bit of research and found this article that will explain it far better than I can.  Suggest you also to more specific Google searches based on your wider knowledge of pottery.  Hope this helps:  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ceramic_glaze

Hey Larry, thanks for this inf. I bought a nice tae pot and cup set a while back. When I got home I noticed a small  unglazed area inside , about the size of a quarter. I wanted to use it for tea, but was afraid to get toxins from the unglazed spot. So I never used it. I would want to put very hot water into it with a mesh tea ball to make tea. Is there any way that I can fix this ? Glue, paint or such ? 
Hi.  Sorry but, mentioned above, I know very little about pottery. Suggest you do a Google search for hobby groups or a pottery trade association and see what information they might have.
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river rat
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river rat
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09 Jan 2018, 15:16 #11

 interesting. i dunno. been using mine for years. wash them with the dishes. lol i also use unglazed rocks to smash seeds, nuts,pemmican, ect. i also use unglazed wooden spoons to stir things, these all are porous things to some extent that could hold particles i guess. one thing i will ad about the pottery though is, if you use it to cook with you have to "temper"it. meaning a water soak, then rub with oil, then wash that out and let dry .that pretty much seals it from what i read.seems to work for me anyways. 
cooking1.jpg
pots.jpg
cup.jpg
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blancoh0
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blancoh0
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09 Jan 2018, 15:45 #12

So, do you drink hot liquids from your pottery ? Never gotten sick from it ?
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Bill Skinner
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09 Jan 2018, 18:49 #13

I use my unglazed pottery, some for cooking but mostly for drinking coffee, I haven't gotten sick.  After the first or second use, the pottery won't absorb any more oils or liquids.

Believe it or not, you have to watch out for soap.  It will wash out the oils and replace them.  And when you use the pot next, you get the runs from the soap contamination.

I have never let food or liquids sit and spoil in one of my pots, I rinse them out with plain water as soon as I am done with them.  Depending on my cooking, I sometimes have to soak them and scrub them with a brush with natural fibers to get the cooked on stuff out.

I made a garlic cooker for my brother from unglazed pottery, he just rinses it in the sink when he's done.  He's been using it for years.  
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blancoh0
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blancoh0
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09 Jan 2018, 23:01 #14

Sound good . Now to make some tea in this beautiful pot. The glaze color is awesome. The shape too. I will post a picture.
SAM_6846.jpg
SAM_6845.jpg
SAM_6844.jpg
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Bill Skinner
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Bill Skinner
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10 Jan 2018, 03:42 #15

That's awesome.  Did you make it?

You have to pre warm my pots, if you put it over a burner and turned the heat up, I'm pretty sure bad things would happen.
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river rat
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10 Jan 2018, 15:59 #16

blancoh0 wrote: So, do you drink hot liquids from your pottery ? Never gotten sick from it ?
ive made soups in them, coffee, bread\biscuits, roasted wild garlic, ect ect, im still kicking
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blancoh0
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blancoh0
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10 Jan 2018, 16:37 #17

Bill Skinner wrote: That's awesome.  Did you make it?

You have to pre warm my pots, if you put it over a burner and turned the heat up, I'm pretty sure bad things would happen.
This not a pot for direct fire. The hot water is poured into it. A screen mesh tea strainer came with it. It would surely crack if put on direct heat. FYI
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Bill Skinner
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Bill Skinner
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12 Jan 2018, 21:09 #18

Thank you.  
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