Warclub Question?

wildrider
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wildrider
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Joined: March 8th, 2017, 7:58 pm

March 8th, 2017, 7:58 pm #1

Hey Guys. Been Intrigued and amazed by the craftsmanship and knowledge here. Dying to try my hand at making a Ball-head war club. I understand from reading here that a club made from the rootball is the stronger and the desired method. Have not started looking for a proper tree yet to use (located in Central Va, so maybe Hickory, Oak, Maple). My questin is what size tree / sapling, would have the proper rootball? Would a tree, say 3'' in diameter be somewhat the right size to have a large  enough root to shape the ball from? Appreciate any info and would love to see a "before" pic of the rough  rootball someone is planning to use to make one. Thanks.
Last edited by wildrider on March 8th, 2017, 8:00 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Tyrannocaster
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Tyrannocaster
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Joined: October 12th, 2015, 4:21 pm

March 9th, 2017, 1:29 am #2

My guess is that no, the rootball would not be big enough. But I certainly don't know everything.
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Peatreg
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Peatreg
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March 9th, 2017, 4:07 pm #3

If you're on Facebook lookup "Woodland Warclubs" artist page. Corey Boise is the man that could help you out. He is a master at Woodland style warclubs. Here is one he made for me. I added the drop...
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Larry Moniz
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Larry Moniz
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March 12th, 2017, 6:40 am #4

That's a Pogamogan. Made by Northeastern Woodlands tribes including the Iroquois Six Nations and Huron Confederacy. I've seen modern copies that were so incredibly oversized and heavy that it would have taken an Olypic Heavyweight weightlifter to run through the forest with them. They were designed to be light enough to carry many miles by warriors then repeatedly wield, as necessary, in battle. The best instructions I've ever seen on how to make one were in a book entitled: The Book of Indian Crafts and Costumes by Bernard S. Mason. It was published by A.S. Barnes and Co. in 1946. I've had my hardcover copy since I was a boy in the 1950s. It cost $5 then. I'm sure it's long out of print so can't even begin to suggest a library source. For whatever it's worth, I hope that helps.
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Michael Bootz
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Michael Bootz
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Joined: September 21st, 2007, 4:23 pm

March 12th, 2017, 11:51 am #5

Just did a quick search and that book is still available used for a fair price:
http://www.bookfinder.com/search/?ac=sl ... 20costumes
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Tyrannocaster
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Tyrannocaster
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March 13th, 2017, 1:00 am #6

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Larry Moniz
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Larry Moniz
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March 14th, 2017, 6:26 am #7

Hi Michael B. Never dreamed that was still available. My copy is at least 60 years old! One of the first books I ever bought with my allowance.


Wildrider. Somewhere as a kid (no idea where) I read about Indians twisting a young sapling into a single knot (such as half a square knot) and letting it grow until it became a satisfactory size. Of course, the drawback is that it could take 15 or 20 years to grow large enough to harvest and carve. I guess if an Indian child stared at age 5, he'd have a warclub-sized piece of maple or oak by the time he hit the war trail. Just remember, too big and it becomes a nightmare to carry for miles in a real-time situation. A tennis ball-sized business end is just as good as one that's softball-sized. In addition, with everything else in scale and make of a good hardwood, it will withstand any battle situation. Theoretically speaking, of course.
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wildrider
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wildrider
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March 30th, 2017, 3:08 pm #8

Thanks for all the help. Found a suitable tree with rootball. Trunk directly above rootball is approximately 3"
Last edited by wildrider on March 30th, 2017, 3:15 pm, edited 2 times in total.
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wildrider
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wildrider
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April 6th, 2017, 11:18 am #9

Quick update:



Some rough shaping before drying



 
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