Beaver tail hide knife sheaths, shooting bags

Hide tanning, leather crafts, skinning, and all related topics

Beaver tail hide knife sheaths, shooting bags

beardedhorse
Registered User
beardedhorse
Registered User
Joined: March 27th, 2009, 6:35 am

July 10th, 2018, 12:05 am #1

Post on quilled knife sheaths reminded me to ask if anyone has seen documentation on historic artifacts made of or using beaver tail..  I saw a photo of a beaver tail knife sheath with a part of it using a painted rawhide (parfleche).   It was in a museum and printed in a back issue of Muzzle Blasts.   Have seen examples of modern shooting bags for muzzle loading rifles with beaver tail but not sure if there is evidence of their construction, use and existence in the 1700-1800's.   Any documentable examples would be helpful.  - Time, museum, tribal or regional provenance.
Quote
Like
Share

Dan Rowlett
Registered User
Dan Rowlett
Registered User
Joined: September 1st, 2017, 7:33 pm

July 10th, 2018, 12:39 am #2

I cant answer your question but I've tanned several beaver tails. They make very interesting leather. Though mine come out pretty stiff

Sent from my SM-G892A using Tapatalk

Quote
Like
Share

beardedhorse
Registered User
beardedhorse
Registered User
Joined: March 27th, 2009, 6:35 am

July 13th, 2018, 12:17 am #3

Dan,  I've heard of people tanning beaver tail soft enough for wallets.  I  usually skin mine thin and leave the fat which doesn't respond well to natural tanning solutions such as brains.   I wind up laminating the dried and fleshed hides to bark tanned leather.    What do you use to tan your tails with?  Glycerin works on snake skin that have been degreased. 
Quote
Like
Share

Dan Rowlett
Registered User
Dan Rowlett
Registered User
Joined: September 1st, 2017, 7:33 pm

July 13th, 2018, 2:04 am #4

beardedhorse wrote:Dan,  I've heard of people tanning beaver tail soft enough for wallets.  I  usually skin mine thin and leave the fat which doesn't respond well to natural tanning solutions such as brains.   I wind up laminating the dried and fleshed hides to bark tanned leather.    What do you use to tan your tails with?  Glycerin works on snake skin that have been degreased. 
I veg tan beaver tail. Quebraho bark. I have done the same with snake skin. I've also alum tanned snake and one time used a commercial "Reptile Tan" no idea what's in it. Many years ago I lived in Louisiana, while there I used glycerin on a snapping turtle and a snake skin. Both skins came out very soft but they drew moisture like Crazy with the high humidity.
I've come to prefer Quebracho bark veg tan for just about everything. Unless I'm making buckskin.
Here are a few examples, snakeskin belt, snapping turtle, bull frog. All Quebracho tanned

Sent from my SM-G892A using Tapatalk

Quote
Like
Share

paskinner
Registered User
paskinner
Registered User
Joined: March 24th, 2008, 5:52 pm

July 14th, 2018, 3:03 pm #5

Nice work, Dan. Quebracho is good stuff. Never done beaver tails with it for some reason.Do you put them in dry? It seems like I did try once, but it didn't seem like they were taking the tannins.
Quote
Like
Share

Dan Rowlett
Registered User
Dan Rowlett
Registered User
Joined: September 1st, 2017, 7:33 pm

July 15th, 2018, 3:59 pm #6

paskinner wrote:Nice work, Dan. Quebracho is good stuff. Never done beaver tails with it for some reason.Do you put them in dry? It seems like I did try once, but it didn't seem like they were taking the tannins.
I put them in fresh, after fleshing, left them in the tan a very long time, one of those throw it in and forget tans. They eventually took the tan. I'm not saying that's best, because though they took the tan they came out stiff. Like rawhide. I think they would make a good knife sheath.
Beaver tail seems like all gristle. I shave them as thin as I can without cutting through, and toss them in the tan.

Sent from my SM-G892A using Tapatalk

Quote
Like
Share