Preferred Woodworking stone type

A forum for discussion about the actual use of stone tools for woodworking, and other tasks.

Preferred Woodworking stone type

VirginiaKnapper
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VirginiaKnapper
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Joined: March 13th, 2018, 4:32 pm

June 13th, 2018, 2:35 pm #1

I have been praticioning with different kinds of stone for wood carving. So far, a unique kind of Jasper has performed the best for both shaving and scraping and carving, which I have used to shave bullroarers and carve an atlatl. Since y'all should have nuch more experiance than I, what works best for others? So far, the jasper has outdone my other stones.

Frank

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"It's about what you learn, not what you make" - Erret Callahan
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Robson Valley
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Robson Valley
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Joined: April 24th, 2015, 12:27 am

June 13th, 2018, 4:02 pm #2

The hardest stone in the Pacific Northwest is nephrite jade.  Some sort of a fibrous iron-based mineral of gemstone quality.
Ground down, it was used for adze blades.
Those would have been very effective when working western red cedar for dishes, boxes poles and boats.

Google UBC/MOA and use the search in the online collection to see examples.
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VirginiaKnapper
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VirginiaKnapper
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June 13th, 2018, 4:41 pm #3

You actually discussed just that in the Axe rock thread. The UBC collection is mostly ethic items, but does contain some neat examples of Native American artifacts.

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Hummingbird Point
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Hummingbird Point
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Joined: October 28th, 2009, 4:36 pm

June 16th, 2018, 10:59 pm #4

Hope this link works.  Pages 113-115

https://books.google.com/books?id=HlwUo ... ly&f=false
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Robson Valley
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Robson Valley
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June 18th, 2018, 5:27 am #5

What are "ethnic" items?
I apologize.  You need to be in the museum.  Less than 10% of the collection is on line.
There are rows of jade adze heads in one of the drawers beneath a show case.
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VirginiaKnapper
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VirginiaKnapper
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June 18th, 2018, 11:38 am #6

Ethnic items are things such as clothing, jewelry, stuff that distinctifies a culture.

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"Win some, lose some, and sometimes ran out" - Kenny Roberts
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VirginiaKnapper
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VirginiaKnapper
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Joined: March 13th, 2018, 4:32 pm

June 18th, 2018, 12:57 pm #7

Thanks for the link Copi. I heard that they wood sand wood by grinding it on sandstone, I have none so I utilized concrete, and it works just fine; and what do you know, Jasper flakes!

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"Win some, lose some, and sometimes ran out" - Kenny Roberts
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Robson Valley
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Robson Valley
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June 19th, 2018, 7:17 pm #8

A very old common name for the Equisetum horsetails is "scouring rush."  These plants contain silica crystals in the leaf cells.
Dried, the "rushes" were used for sanding and smoothing wood carvings.  UK/England, if my memory serves.
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Quillsnkiko
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Quillsnkiko
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Joined: June 22nd, 2006, 8:25 am

June 22nd, 2018, 10:30 pm #9

Tons of them grow down in the ditch by my mailbox...them and lots of other weeds and poison ivy. Quills
" You can't stop the waves .... but, you can learn to surf."
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