Bark tanning

Hide tanning, leather crafts, skinning, and all related topics

Bark tanning

paskinner
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paskinner
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June 3rd, 2018, 12:36 am #1

Just a couple short videos on bark tanning. 


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Quillsnkiko
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Quillsnkiko
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June 3rd, 2018, 5:20 pm #2

Good videos , Loren.Be sure to post some on softening  etc...anything you think is helpful. Thanks for posting. Quills
" You can't stop the waves .... but, you can learn to surf."
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paskinner
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June 4th, 2018, 2:00 pm #3

Thanks. One thing that I should try to explain is: keeping the solution strong enough is very important and it can be hard to explain how to tell when it needs strengthening. I usually make it stronger once in the first week and then go by the smell and color. For deer hides, I don't think you can really make it too strong once the hide is started. I've been changing out some of these every week to a fresh solution to try to speed up the process, so we'll see how long it takes.
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Quillsnkiko
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June 6th, 2018, 5:01 pm #4

Thanks for more instructions. So your dumping the older solution and totally changing it to a fresh one? or just pouring fresh into the old stuff??  Quills
" You can't stop the waves .... but, you can learn to surf."
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paskinner
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June 10th, 2018, 1:28 am #5

It really depends on the look and smell of the solution. I did totally replace some, but this week what I had seemed good, so just added some fresh solution. I mix different types together too, like maple and sumac or whatever I have available. 
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Quillsnkiko
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June 10th, 2018, 3:57 am #6

PA you should post  a picture of that beautiful coat here on Paleo Planet.Its outstanding. Quills
" You can't stop the waves .... but, you can learn to surf."
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Dan Rowlett
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July 4th, 2018, 3:25 pm #7

Hey PA,
Havent heard anything of you since the Hide Out forum went away. Glad to hear you're still bark tanning.
Dan Rowlett from Oklahoma

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paskinner
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July 5th, 2018, 1:27 am #8

 Well, you kinda got me starting on the barktanning, glad you are still in the game, Dan. I'm working on a video on sumac tanning. I really love the look it gives the hides and I do believe it has one of the highest concentrations of tannins of anything in my area.
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Dan Rowlett
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July 5th, 2018, 2:38 am #9

Good deal PA, there's sumac everywhere around here. I've always wanted to try it but I'm to lazy to pick and process it

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Dan Rowlett
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July 6th, 2018, 4:02 pm #10

This may be of interest, while its true that once the tannins have completely penetrated the hide, the hide is tanned.
I've barktaned deer in 2 days ( warm weather) by tanning them in an old style washing machine with constant agitation. On that washer leaving the lid open would let it continuously agitate without going through the other cycles.
You can leave hides in bark tan forever I guess, as long as the solution is strong enough and you refill the water that evaporates. Some of the best deer leather I ever made was in the tanning barrel for two years. I was bored with tanning at the time and went on to other projects.
In this pic, there are grained buffalo, elk, ( the elk hide I bought from you PA) some cowhide and I forget what else. They've been in the tan for two years now. The water has evaporated and I refilled them this morning. I'll get to them eventually.
You can see the salts accumulated on the skin. That's why it's important to rinse/wash the skin after tanning. To remove as much salt as possible. Before I learned that I never washed them after tanning. Made fine leather. But, they would draw moisture. Made a cartridge belt with some unwashed leather once. Was good leather but the salt in the leather turned the cartridges green. Washing the hide thoroughly after tanning, before finishing really helps with that. Now I wash the barktanned hide until the water stays clear.
Then I know I've removed all the salt and excess tan solution that I can from the hide

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Dan Rowlett
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July 6th, 2018, 4:03 pm #11

Oops, forgot the picture. Here it is

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paskinner
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July 12th, 2018, 3:17 pm #12

Wow 2 years! I think the longest I've gone is 3 or 4 months. I'm not sure if I know how to post pictures on here anymore, but I'll try.
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torink1
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July 13th, 2018, 3:15 pm #13

Is it possible to do a bark tan with the grain layer removed? How does it turn out?


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paskinner
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July 14th, 2018, 2:58 pm #14

Yes, I've done barktan with the grain removed. The biggest difference is the hide would be less water resistant. It's like dyed braintan but possibly less stretchy. Nice leather for bags. I could see making a jacket or something like that from it.
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paskinner
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July 14th, 2018, 3:10 pm #15



Test, does the link for everyone? This is sumac tanned and dyed. Actually may have started it with maple bark and then gone to sumac.
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Dan Rowlett
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July 14th, 2018, 3:56 pm #16

paskinner wrote:

Test, does the link for everyone? This is sumac tanned and dyed. Actually may have started it with maple bark and then gone to sumac.
I can see it. Looks good. I sometimes get hides that are mottled like that one. Personally I like the look, but I found it I stretched them well, like over a staking horse, the color evened out alot

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Dan Rowlett
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Dan Rowlett
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July 14th, 2018, 3:56 pm #17

One day I'm going to have to stop being lazy and try sumac tanning

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Dan Rowlett
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July 14th, 2018, 4:04 pm #18

Grained barktan, it works, grain like buckskin, veg tan, then oil and soften with brain. It can come out very soft if done right, like this one. Softening is much, much easier than buckskin. And it makes good curtains!
torink1 wrote:Is it possible to do a bark tan with the grain layer removed? How does it turn out?


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paskinner
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July 14th, 2018, 4:39 pm #19

Dan Rowlett wrote:
paskinner wrote:

Test, does the link for everyone? This is sumac tanned and dyed. Actually may have started it with maple bark and then gone to sumac.
I can see it. Looks good. I sometimes get hides that are mottled like that one. Personally I like the look, but I found it I stretched them well, like over a staking horse, the color evened out alot

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Yeah, I think the mottled look makes them look old and I'm trying to appeal to people who make old looking stuff.
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Dan Rowlett
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July 14th, 2018, 5:03 pm #20

paskinner wrote:
Dan Rowlett wrote:
paskinner wrote:

Test, does the link for everyone? This is sumac tanned and dyed. Actually may have started it with maple bark and then gone to sumac.
I can see it. Looks good. I sometimes get hides that are mottled like that one. Personally I like the look, but I found it I stretched them well, like over a staking horse, the color evened out alot

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Yeah, I think the mottled look makes them look old and I'm trying to appeal to people who make old looking stuff.
Yes it does look old, I like the look. I made a pair of kneehigh plainsman boots fro deer leather like that. Came out nice

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