Even More Plum Bows

Tim Baker
Registered User
Tim Baker
Registered User
Joined: 6:22 AM - May 23, 2005

12:46 AM - May 25, 2018 #1

 
Not the Plum masterpieces of  Druid's and Pathfinder's, but appealing in their own simple way. Even small plum branches can become serious bows. Small diameter plum bark is flexible enough such that it can usually be left untouched on the back, for beauty and camouflage. Don't know exactly why, but if my house was burning down these are the first bows I'd rush in to save. 
DSC05471. 20 jpg.jpg
DSC05471. 20 jpg.jpg
Quote
Like
Share

reverseparking
Registered User
reverseparking
Registered User
Joined: 2:39 PM - May 19, 2018

9:25 AM - May 25, 2018 #2

Seen them before and like them a lot. Especially the shorter one.  I think bows like these are the essence of a primitive bow. Any more detailed photos? How long are they?

It's interesting which bows one gets attached to...Not often the shiny, pipe straight, zero-set speed demon, they have to be something more than that to be rescued from a burning house. 
http://europeanprimitivebows.se/
Quote
Like
Share

Stalker
Registered User
Stalker
Registered User
Joined: 11:04 AM - Sep 30, 2015

2:24 PM - May 25, 2018 #3

I really like the bark intact look. Unfortunately haven't yet found plum and any hazel that I want to keep bark doesn't want it. What are poundages and dimensions of those three bows?
Filip
Quote
Like
Share

Tim Baker
Registered User
Tim Baker
Registered User
Joined: 6:22 AM - May 23, 2005

9:59 AM - May 26, 2018 #4

Those three are either at my other place, or as likely they've been given to teachers when demonstrating bows for their Indian American classes. 
 
reverseparking: Like many of us, the kids somehow sense such simple bows are pure and authentic and what primitive archery is all about. Most of the teachers allow shooting demos and the kids completely light up in attention.
 
Here are a couple essentially the same as the above. 
 
The top bow is 47.5" long, 7/8" wide at the widest, weights 9.5 ounces, draws 30# at 15", estimated 42# at 20", pushing 48# at 22, likely about its most efficient draw length.
 
The bottom bow is 49" long, 15/16" wide at its widest, weighs 12 ounces, draws 32# at 15" est. 45# at 20, about 50# at, 23", it's likely most efficient draw length.

It might actually be a species of wild cherry.
 
They haven't been drawn for a couple of years, so will work them back to life tomorrow before taking them to full draw.
DSC01659 20 .jpg
DSC01658 20 .jpg
DSC01650 20 .jpg
Quote
Like
Share

French Crow
Registered User
French Crow
Registered User
Joined: 5:31 PM - May 25, 2006

4:02 PM - May 26, 2018 #5

Sapling bows are very appealing, most of the bow still being in its natural shape, with minimal adjustments in wideness and thickness.
Yet in "house burning down" situation I think I would save first the bows that were the most tricky to make.
Bruno
Quote
Like
Share

BillOregon
Registered User
BillOregon
Registered User
Joined: 12:00 AM - Mar 14, 2004

12:03 PM - Jun 10, 2018 #6

I moved from a place in southern Oregon where I was nurturing two plum trees and a hazel just for these kinds of bows. I miss those trees! Thank you, Tim.
Quote
Like
Share

Pathfinder78
Registered User
Pathfinder78
Registered User
Joined: 6:29 AM - Jan 29, 2008

7:54 AM - Jun 11, 2018 #7

The top bow looks...top! Just love it.
Buttercup: We'll never survive.
Westley: Nonsense. You're only saying that because no one ever has.
"The Princess Bride"

Quote
Like
Share

Rod
Registered User
Rod
Registered User
Joined: 11:07 PM - Jun 17, 2005

9:27 AM - Jun 13, 2018 #8

I do like those stage 2 or 3 bows* with bark on the back.

*
Stage 1 is the asymmetric "cut a sapling and string it" bow.
Stage 2 is as above, but more symmetrical, with the thick end tapered.
Stage 3 is as 2, but with both ends tapered.
It's meant to be simple, not easy.
Quote
Like
Share