Origins of archery terms

For discussion related to primitive bows.

Origins of archery terms

Tim Baker
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Tim Baker
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Joined: May 23rd, 2005, 6:22 am

May 13th, 2018, 7:05 am #1

https://www.etymonline.com/
 
A good place to look up the origin of archery terms. For example:
 
The English word 'bow' comes from Proto Indo European 'pheug', to bend, via Proto-Germanic 'bugon'

And from old Englisn, 'boga'
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Tim Baker
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Tim Baker
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Joined: May 23rd, 2005, 6:22 am

May 15th, 2018, 10:27 pm #2

I've always imagined that just as line comes from linen that bow came from bough, a tree branch. That would make so much sense. Just as it would make sense that the name for big iron ferris wheels came from ferrous via Latin ferrum, for iron. But no, it was named after it's inventor, George Ferris. There's a lesson there somewhere.
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Fundin
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Fundin
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Joined: March 7th, 2005, 3:22 am

May 16th, 2018, 12:29 pm #3

I once had an Idea that the latin Taxus baccata was the tax of baccius (wine) that was taxed with yew....Seems Linneaus didnt make that connection, and that Taxus baccata actually means something different...
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George Tsoukalas
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George Tsoukalas
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Joined: May 24th, 2005, 3:38 am

June 8th, 2018, 12:56 pm #4

The Greek word for bow is "toxo" from which the term toxophile comes.

I remember my mother, of eternal memory, taking me for a walk after a rainstorm when I was 5 y/o and seeing a rainbow. 

She called it an ouraniotoxo...bow of the heavens. 

I've never forgotten that even though it is coming up to 65 years ago.

Jawge
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French Crow
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French Crow
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Joined: May 25th, 2006, 5:31 pm

June 9th, 2018, 2:13 pm #5

Archer/archery is from old French "arc" and Latine "arcus" = bow, arch.
Bruno
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French Crow
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French Crow
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Joined: May 25th, 2006, 5:31 pm

June 9th, 2018, 2:22 pm #6

Quiver : from Anglo-French quiveir, Old French quivre, cuivre = copper.
I don't know if it is related but antique quivers made from copper and bronze were found.
Bruno
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Dark Factor
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Dark Factor
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Joined: May 29th, 2016, 4:15 pm

June 10th, 2018, 9:24 am #7

Also "bois d'arc" (osage orange) is the french expression used by french settlers (Louisiana... when it was a french colony) ... bois d'arc just mean " bow wood"    'bow=arc'  'wood=bois'
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Rod
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Rod
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Joined: June 17th, 2005, 11:07 pm

June 13th, 2018, 8:50 am #8

Quiver might as easily be from the same root as cuire, with a suffix implying "made of". 
But as Tim suggests, etymology is not just a case of words sounding alike.
Some early quivers were probably case-skinned hides of appopriate proportions, others made from hollow stems, of folded or rolled bark or hide, or of basketwork. 
The nomenclature might then as describe the manner of production as readily as the intended use and could even be a loaned word from another language..
It's meant to be simple, not easy.
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