Thunderbolt White Buffalo

ateyo
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ateyo
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February 8th, 2018, 12:56 am #1

I am creating a belt pouch depicting the emblem of the Chickamauga Nation. Tribal colors are red and black. I used the cheap Chinese beads on the triangles and diamond patterns. I kind of regret that decision now because I am forced to alter my bead count to accommadate the irregular sizes and shapes. The buffalo will be white with a red thunderbolt across his rump. I think I will use only Czech beads for the image. In the future, I will make only Christmas ornaments using the cheap beads!

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blancoh0
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February 8th, 2018, 4:05 pm #2

ateyo wrote: I am creating a belt pouch depicting the emblem of the Chickamauga Nation.  Tribal colors are red and black.  I used the cheap Chinese beads on the triangles and diamond patterns. I kind of regret that decision now because I am forced to alter my bead count to accommadate the irregular sizes  and shapes.  The buffalo will be white with a red thunderbolt across his rump.  I think I will use only Czech beads for the image.  In the future, I will make only Christmas ornaments using the cheap beads!

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Looks great so far !
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blancoh0
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February 8th, 2018, 4:06 pm #3

I have to try beading. It looks very nice. I loved the "White Buffalo" movie with Charles Bronson. It was very well done.
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Michael Bootz
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February 8th, 2018, 5:30 pm #4

Looks pretty good. Can't wait to see it when it's finished.
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ateyo
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February 9th, 2018, 1:08 am #5

blancoh0 wrote:I have to try beading. It looks very nice. I loved the "White Buffalo" movie with Charles Bronson. It was very well done.
I haven't seen that Charles Bronson film! But the White Buffalo is significant to the Lakota and many other tribes. White Buffalo Calf Woman brought the pipe and sweat lodge ceremonies to the People. The Chickamauga come from a region of Tennessee and Kentucky which had a buffalo population before the whites came. Although they didn't have a buffalo culture as the Plains Indians, the White Buffalo has significance.

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ateyo
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February 9th, 2018, 1:10 am #6

Michael Bootz wrote:Looks pretty good. Can't wait to see it when it's finished.
I work a little each day. I hope to complete it within two weeks. I could work faster but I don't want to give myself a headache and tense shoulders!

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blancoh0
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February 9th, 2018, 2:24 am #7

I hear you ! If its not fun its work and I am retired from work. So just have fun ! 
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ateyo
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February 11th, 2018, 2:58 am #8

Progress report. I got impatient and started outlining the buffalo with the lumpy Chinese beads. This morning, I reconsidered and pulled out all the beaded outline. Then, starting from the center, i started filling in with the nice Czech 11 (which are much smaller than Chinese 11s!) I worked until I ran out of white beads. But I am so much happier with the results!
I haven't figured out how to rotate photos on my tablet or here, but you get the idea!

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ateyo
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February 11th, 2018, 3:12 am #9

ateyo wrote:Progress report. I got impatient and started outlining the buffalo with the lumpy Chinese beads. This morning, I reconsidered and pulled out all the beaded outline. Then, starting from the center, i started filling in with the nice Czech 11 (which are much smaller than Chinese 11s!) I worked until I ran out of white beads. But I am so much happier with the results!
I haven't figured out how to rotate photos on my tablet or here, but you get the idea!

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I can't figure out how to make animal shapes wiithout drawing onto the leather, and I've never used a grid layout paper graph for reference. I sure don't like the smudges from my swesty little fingers, though! Any suggestions?

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ateyo
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February 11th, 2018, 3:13 am #10

ateyo wrote:Progress report. I got impatient and started outlining the buffalo with the lumpy Chinese beads. This morning, I reconsidered and pulled out all the beaded outline. Then, starting from the center, i started filling in with the nice Czech 11 (which are much smaller than Chinese 11s!) I worked until I ran out of white beads. But I am so much happier with the results!
I haven't figured out how to rotate photos on my tablet or here, but you get the idea!

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I can't figure out how to make animal shapes wiithout drawing onto the leather, and I've never used a grid layout paper graph for reference. I sure don't like the smudges from my sweaty little fingers, though! Any suggestions?

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Michael Bootz
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February 11th, 2018, 8:42 am #11

I use erasable pens to draw on the leather. Once I'm done with the beading, I erase any pen lines or smudges that are visible.
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Lazy Stitch
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February 11th, 2018, 8:32 pm #12

ateyo wrote:
ateyo wrote:Progress report.  I got impatient and started outlining the buffalo with the lumpy Chinese beads.  This morning, I reconsidered and pulled out all the beaded outline.  Then, starting from the center, i started filling in with the nice Czech 11 (which are much smaller than Chinese 11s!)  I worked until I ran out of white beads.  But I am so much happier with the results!
I haven't figured out how to rotate photos on my tablet or here, but you get the idea!

Sent from my SM-T350 using Tapatalk
I can't figure out how to make animal shapes wiithout drawing onto the leather, and I've never used a grid layout paper graph for reference. I sure don't like the smudges from my sweaty little fingers, though! Any suggestions?

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As long as you bead to the line, it won't show when you are done.  If you draw it, then use a fine tipped ink pen, as it won't smudge.  Even so, drawing on leather is almost always imprecise except for the most basic shapes, no matter how fine your writing instrument.  When doing 2-needle applique, I find that it helps to do the outline of the main image first and to tack it down every 2-3 beads so that it stays tight and true.  Then fill the interior, and then fill the exterior around the main design.  To keep the lines crisp, I glue a photocopy of the design to whatever I'm beading on, and then all you gotta do is bead to the lines.  This removes all of the guesswork and makes for sharp lines.  I do my applique on canvas or crib sheeting and then transfer that to brain tan.  I finish it off by putting a lane of lazy stitch over the edge of the canvas or crib sheeting.  I learned this from Crow and Shoshone beadworkers, and it is a very common technique among applique beadworkers. One of the favored mediums for rosette makers is 3x5 index cards, so don't take any guff about it's "not how Indians do it." You can also glue the template to your leather and save the step of gluing the finished work to the leather, but you'll still have to do something to hide the edge.  The other key is to use small beads.  Czech 13's are the way to go for this kind of work. 

Here are some pics of how I do it.  The maple leaf in the first image is on crib sheeting, and you can also see where I've traced a horse design above it using a template. If I did that horse again, I would use a photocopy of the image.  The leaf image was photocopied and pasted to the crib sheeting.  The second image shows the finished after it was transferred to brain tanned antelope and made into a belt bag.  

For good designs that are easy to transfer to applique beadwork, do a Google search for tattoo patterns.  It's how I get all of my animal and flower motifs.  Print it, glue it, bead it. 



New Maple Leaf.JPG

Bag Applique Maple Leaf Clamshell (2).JPG
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blancoh0
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February 12th, 2018, 4:03 am #13

Very Nice ! I saw somewhere that threading about five beads, then sewing to leather, then another 5, repeating, till the pattern is  done. us this correct ? I have some nice beads and threading needles. But have never used them. I also have a large roll of dental floss type thread. Is this good for beading ? Thanks. I may try this. I have run out of Native Medicine Pouch ideas for now. I need a new distraction. Thanks.
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Lazy Stitch
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February 13th, 2018, 3:12 am #14

blancoh0 wrote: Very Nice ! I saw somewhere that threading about five beads, then sewing to leather, then another 5, repeating, till the pattern is  done. us this correct ? I have some nice beads and threading needles. But have never used them. I also have a large roll of dental floss type thread. Is this good for beading ? Thanks. I may try this. I have run out of Native Medicine Pouch ideas for now. I need a new distraction. Thanks.
How often you tack the beads down is a function of bead size and the pattern's complexity.  Even when using small beads, such as 13/0, I tack down outlines and perimeter rows every 2-3 beads.  With larger beads, such as 11/0, it's every two beads for outlines and perimeters.  This keeps the outlines and perimeters straight and very tight, and it keeps them from getting pushed out of shape when you do the fill, especially if the fill runs at an angle to the outlines.  Tacking down in the body of the piece can be a lot less often, say every 4-5 beads, especially if the fill is done in straight lines.  If the fill is curved or circular, I usually tack down every 3 beads.  It is tedious, but it guarantees that your curves retain their proper shapes.   The bag below was done this way.  It's in 12/0 and 13/0 Czech beads.

Dental floss is not a good choice for beadwork, as it is needlessly heavy and cannot be used with beading needles, as it will not pass the eyes.  All you need is good quality linen, cotton or cotton-poly thread, and bee's wax, which will make the thread tacky and easier to handle.  Most beadworkers will tell you to use Nymo, which is a synthetic thread that comes in a variety of thicknesses.  I've abandoned Nymo except for moccasins and peyote stitch, where its strength and the ability to use fine diameter threads are sometimers useful.  Otherwise, it is just an overpriced product that is outperformed in most uses by natural materials, such as cotton or linen.  Bag Blue Bison Skull M. Ellis .jpg
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ateyo
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February 13th, 2018, 9:28 pm #15

Lazy Stitch wrote:
blancoh0 wrote: Very Nice ! I saw somewhere that threading about five beads, then sewing to leather, then another 5, repeating, till the pattern is  done. us this correct ? I have some nice beads and threading needles. But have never used them. I also have a large roll of dental floss type thread. Is this good for beading ? Thanks. I may try this. I have run out of Native Medicine Pouch ideas for now. I need a new distraction. Thanks.
How often you tack the beads down is a function of bead size and the pattern's complexity.  Even when using small beads, such as 13/0, I tack down outlines and perimeter rows every 2-3 beads.  With larger beads, such as 11/0, it's every two beads for outlines and perimeters.  This keeps the outlines and perimeters straight and very tight, and it keeps them from getting pushed out of shape when you do the fill, especially if the fill runs at an angle to the outlines.  Tacking down in the body of the piece can be a lot less often, say every 4-5 beads, especially if the fill is done in straight lines.  If the fill is curved or circular, I usually tack down every 3 beads.  It is tedious, but it guarantees that your curves retain their proper shapes.   The bag below was done this way.  It's in 12/0 and 13/0 Czech beads.

Dental floss is not a good choice for beadwork, as it is needlessly heavy and cannot be used with beading needles, as it will not pass the eyes.  All you need is good quality linen, cotton or cotton-poly thread, and bee's wax, which will make the thread tacky and easier to handle.  Most beadworkers will tell you to use Nymo, which is a synthetic thread that comes in a variety of thicknesses.  I've abandoned Nymo except for moccasins and peyote stitch, where its strength and the ability to use fine diameter threads are sometimers useful.  Otherwise, it is just an overpriced product that is outperformed in most uses by natural materials, such as cotton or linen.  Bag Blue Bison Skull M. Ellis .jpg
LAZY STITCH! SGI! Thank you! Your info is very useful. And thanks for your comments, especially the one about "that's not how the Indians do it." Is crib sheeting a certain fabric? I was thinking of using felt and appliquing that to the leather. But I wasn't sure if the beading thread would tear out eventually if worn every day.
I AM ALL KINDS OF EXCITED NOW!

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blancoh0
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February 13th, 2018, 9:33 pm #16

Lazy Stitch wrote:
blancoh0 wrote: Very Nice ! I saw somewhere that threading about five beads, then sewing to leather, then another 5, repeating, till the pattern is  done. us this correct ? I have some nice beads and threading needles. But have never used them. I also have a large roll of dental floss type thread. Is this good for beading ? Thanks. I may try this. I have run out of Native Medicine Pouch ideas for now. I need a new distraction. Thanks.
How often you tack the beads down is a function of bead size and the pattern's complexity.  Even when using small beads, such as 13/0, I tack down outlines and perimeter rows every 2-3 beads.  With larger beads, such as 11/0, it's every two beads for outlines and perimeters.  This keeps the outlines and perimeters straight and very tight, and it keeps them from getting pushed out of shape when you do the fill, especially if the fill runs at an angle to the outlines.  Tacking down in the body of the piece can be a lot less often, say every 4-5 beads, especially if the fill is done in straight lines.  If the fill is curved or circular, I usually tack down every 3 beads.  It is tedious, but it guarantees that your curves retain their proper shapes.   The bag below was done this way.  It's in 12/0 and 13/0 Czech beads.

Dental floss is not a good choice for beadwork, as it is needlessly heavy and cannot be used with beading needles, as it will not pass the eyes.  All you need is good quality linen, cotton or cotton-poly thread, and bee's wax, which will make the thread tacky and easier to handle.  Most beadworkers will tell you to use Nymo, which is a synthetic thread that comes in a variety of thicknesses.  I've abandoned Nymo except for moccasins and peyote stitch, where its strength and the ability to use fine diameter threads are sometimers useful.  Otherwise, it is just an overpriced product that is outperformed in most uses by natural materials, such as cotton or linen.  Bag Blue Bison Skull M. Ellis .jpg
*************** I love the Buffalo hardware. Where can I get some ?******************
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blancoh0
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February 13th, 2018, 9:34 pm #17

where can I get the Buffalo Hardware ? Thimballs & Coin rivet/snaps ?
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ateyo
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February 13th, 2018, 9:38 pm #18

ateyo wrote:
Lazy Stitch wrote:
blancoh0 wrote: Very Nice ! I saw somewhere that threading about five beads, then sewing to leather, then another 5, repeating, till the pattern is  done. us this correct ? I have some nice beads and threading needles. But have never used them. I also have a large roll of dental floss type thread. Is this good for beading ? Thanks. I may try this. I have run out of Native Medicine Pouch ideas for now. I need a new distraction. Thanks.
How often you tack the beads down is a function of bead size and the pattern's complexity.  Even when using small beads, such as 13/0, I tack down outlines and perimeter rows every 2-3 beads.  With larger beads, such as 11/0, it's every two beads for outlines and perimeters.  This keeps the outlines and perimeters straight and very tight, and it keeps them from getting pushed out of shape when you do the fill, especially if the fill runs at an angle to the outlines.  Tacking down in the body of the piece can be a lot less often, say every 4-5 beads, especially if the fill is done in straight lines.  If the fill is curved or circular, I usually tack down every 3 beads.  It is tedious, but it guarantees that your curves retain their proper shapes.   The bag below was done this way.  It's in 12/0 and 13/0 Czech beads.

Dental floss is not a good choice for beadwork, as it is needlessly heavy and cannot be used with beading needles, as it will not pass the eyes.  All you need is good quality linen, cotton or cotton-poly thread, and bee's wax, which will make the thread tacky and easier to handle.  Most beadworkers will tell you to use Nymo, which is a synthetic thread that comes in a variety of thicknesses.  I've abandoned Nymo except for moccasins and peyote stitch, where its strength and the ability to use fine diameter threads are sometimers useful.  Otherwise, it is just an overpriced product that is outperformed in most uses by natural materials, such as cotton or linen.  Bag Blue Bison Skull M. Ellis .jpg
LAZY STITCH! SGI! Thank you! Your info is very useful. And thanks for your comments, especially the one about "that's not how the Indians do it." Is crib sheeting a certain fabric? I was thinking of using felt and appliquing that to the leather. But I wasn't sure if the beading thread would tear out eventually if worn every day.
I AM ALL KINDS OF EXCITED NOW!

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I have used Nymo and was not impressed with its stiffness. However, I saw a Utube video of a woman using Nymo to bead number 16s on the brim of baseball caps. The benefit of Nymo is that one can burn the end of the thread instead of knotting it.
Erasable ink would work on smooth finished leathers, but not on the fleshy side of leather. I will give the other ideas a shot, as soon as I figure out what is crib sheet. I thought a crib sheet was a written cheat sheet!

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ateyo
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February 13th, 2018, 9:45 pm #19

ateyo wrote:
ateyo wrote:
Lazy Stitch wrote: How often you tack the beads down is a function of bead size and the pattern's complexity.  Even when using small beads, such as 13/0, I tack down outlines and perimeter rows every 2-3 beads.  With larger beads, such as 11/0, it's every two beads for outlines and perimeters.  This keeps the outlines and perimeters straight and very tight, and it keeps them from getting pushed out of shape when you do the fill, especially if the fill runs at an angle to the outlines.  Tacking down in the body of the piece can be a lot less often, say every 4-5 beads, especially if the fill is done in straight lines.  If the fill is curved or circular, I usually tack down every 3 beads.  It is tedious, but it guarantees that your curves retain their proper shapes.   The bag below was done this way.  It's in 12/0 and 13/0 Czech beads.

Dental floss is not a good choice for beadwork, as it is needlessly heavy and cannot be used with beading needles, as it will not pass the eyes.  All you need is good quality linen, cotton or cotton-poly thread, and bee's wax, which will make the thread tacky and easier to handle.  Most beadworkers will tell you to use Nymo, which is a synthetic thread that comes in a variety of thicknesses.  I've abandoned Nymo except for moccasins and peyote stitch, where its strength and the ability to use fine diameter threads are sometimers useful.  Otherwise, it is just an overpriced product that is outperformed in most uses by natural materials, such as cotton or linen.  Bag Blue Bison Skull M. Ellis .jpg
LAZY STITCH! SGI! Thank you! Your info is very useful. And thanks for your comments, especially the one about "that's not how the Indians do it." Is crib sheeting a certain fabric? I was thinking of using felt and appliquing that to the leather. But I wasn't sure if the beading thread would tear out eventually if worn every day.
I AM ALL KINDS OF EXCITED NOW!

Sent from my SM-T350 using Tapatalk
I have used Nymo and was not impressed with its stiffness. However, I saw a Utube video of a woman using Nymo to bead number 16s on the brim of baseball caps. The benefit of Nymo is that one can burn the end of the thread instead of knotting it.
Erasable ink would work on smooth finished leathers, but not on the fleshy side of leather. I will give the other ideas a shot, as soon as I figure out what is crib sheet. I thought a crib sheet was a written cheat sheet!

Sent from my SM-T350 using Tapatalk
I first learned two needle stitching from an Eskimo woman in Phoenix. (!) Unfortunately, I was under heavy sedation by some genius in the health system. I have lost a lot of those memories, but I am determined to re-learn what I know. (Poor Ella Legg. She wondered why my affect was so flat. I did not figure it out until years later.)


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Lazy Stitch
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February 14th, 2018, 3:26 am #20

ateyo wrote:
ateyo wrote:
ateyo wrote:LAZY STITCH! SGI! Thank you!  Your info is very useful.  And thanks for your comments, especially the one about "that's not how the Indians do it."  Is crib sheeting a certain fabric?  I was thinking of using felt and appliquing that to the leather.  But I wasn't sure if the beading thread would tear out eventually if worn every day.
 I AM ALL KINDS OF EXCITED NOW!

Sent from my SM-T350 using Tapatalk
I have used Nymo and was not impressed with its stiffness.  However, I saw a Utube video of a woman using Nymo to bead number 16s on the brim of baseball caps.  The benefit of Nymo is that one can burn the end of the thread instead of knotting it.
 Erasable ink would work on smooth finished leathers, but not on the fleshy side of leather.  I will give the other ideas a shot, as soon as I figure out what is crib sheet. I thought a crib sheet was a written cheat sheet!

Sent from my SM-T350 using Tapatalk
I first learned two needle stitching from an Eskimo woman in Phoenix. (!)  Unfortunately, I was under heavy sedation by some genius in the health system.  I have lost a lot of those memories, but I am determined to re-learn what I know.  (Poor Ella Legg.  She wondered why my affect was so flat.  I did not figure it out until years later.)  


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Crib sheeting is also sometimes labeled as "hospital sheeting," and it is two very thin and tightly woven layers that are sandwiched on either side of a sheet of super thin and flexible plastic.  When used in baby cribs or hospital beds, the plastic keeps the mattress from getting soiled.  It is the best material I have found for 2-needle applique and is very popular with beadworkers.  Most decent cloth stores should have it, and I learned to use it from a Crow woman, in Montana, and a top notch white fellow, from California.  I find that it works best if you frame it and keep it taut while beading, so I staple mine to wooden frames.  It takes sharp pencil lines very easily, and you can glue paper patterns on it with ease.  You can get the same effect with canvas, and an easy option is to buy framed artist's canvases from any decent craft store.  You can get these in a variety of sizes, which is very helpful.  Once you use the original canvas, just buy more from the cloth store and staple it to the frame, and you're set.  I recommend that you put a coat or two of cheap, white latex paint onto raw canvas after you've framed it.  It will give it some body and also allow you to draw on it.  You can also use artist's gesso, but it's a needless expense, and the paint works just as well.

I don't recommend other materials, such as felt or automotive chamois, as they won't hold up well.  The only other cloth I would recommend is high quality wool, which is used extensively in prairie beadwork and also among some Plateau and Northern Rockies tribes, such as the Crow and Nez Perce.  Even then, you'll want to back it so that the beadwork stays true.  Brown paper grocery bags are the paper of choice.  Of course, if you can get it, high quality brain tan is the only way to go.  Cheaper leathers are usually a challenge to get needles through.  Whatever material you use, your quality will go way up if you staple it onto a solid frame while you are doing the beadwork.  This keeps the beadwork taut and in a single plane, and it's easier to handle.  Most importantly, all of your stitches will have even tension, and it's way easier to lay the rows down against each other.  Hand-holding it can get really messy. 

Cotton, cotton/poly, or linen threads will be superior to Nymo for most kinds of beadwork.  It's cheaper, and you can buy it anywhere, which is a big plus.  Nymo doesn't hold knots well, and melting it is not really useful.  It's just an overhyped product that everybody has fallen for (including me, for many years).  There are thousands of pieces of vintage beadwork in museum and private collections that were made with natural fiber threads, and they are extremely resilient and durable.  Obviously, the best material is sinew, but it's a real dingo to work with, and I don't recommend it until you've mastered the techniques. 
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