Hello ...... from the forest in Carpathian.

Identification, cultivation, harvesting, preparing, preserving, recipies, general ethnobotany... Disclaimer: Don't experiment with unknown plants, or rely on the information in this forum. Get your own information and use CAUTION!
Also,
A forum dedicated to sharing thought, ideas, methods and tools related to cooking and food preparation. Including, but not limited to discussion about cooking
vessels, mud/adobe ovens, fire pits and other methods of cooking. Also of interest would be archaeological and/or anthropological reference material pertaining
to our ancestors means and methods of food production and preparation.

Hello ...... from the forest in Carpathian.

Ibor
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Ibor
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Joined: January 11th, 2018, 9:23 pm

January 11th, 2018, 9:53 pm #1

I am very happy that I found this Forum, because Neolith is my love, work, interest and way of life.
I live in Poland, in the Carpathians and for 17 years I have been dealing with experimental and reconstructive archeology.
For many years, I have been making tools, weapons, ornaments etc. with tools and techniques that could be used in a given era.
I go to various archaeological events and present a workshop from the Bronze Age or the Early Iron Age, and for a few years also a stonework workshop from Neolith.
The culture of battle axes is very close to me due to the ... BEAUTIFUL STONE AXES.
I do a lot of things from wild boar bones and deer antlers from later eras.
Regards to Users!
P.S
I apologize in advance for possible spelling mistakes ... I use an electronic translator.
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Quillsnkiko
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Quillsnkiko
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Joined: June 22nd, 2006, 8:25 am

January 11th, 2018, 10:08 pm #2

Welcome to the Planet Ibor.

I am sure you will find a lot of interesting things in our site. Be sure to check out the Flintknapping Threads & Archaeology section. Feel free to post pictures of your craft work and knowledge.I am sure folks here would find them interesting. Quills
" You can't stop the waves .... but, you can learn to surf."
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Quest for fire
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Quest for fire
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Joined: March 22nd, 2007, 6:19 am

January 12th, 2018, 3:47 am #3

Hello Ibor and welcome.
Is there any chances of pics of the beautiful stone axes?
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Chippintuff
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Chippintuff
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Joined: January 21st, 2011, 12:25 am

January 12th, 2018, 4:19 am #4

Hello and welcome from Texas, USA. I second that we would like to see your work. Seeing the work of others is one of the biggest incentives to use this site. Make suggestions or ask questions as you wish. We like that too.

WA
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Ibor
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Ibor
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Joined: January 11th, 2018, 9:23 pm

January 12th, 2018, 11:52 am #5

Quest for fire,two black granite axes made by me four years ago to order.
Bigger ax, 150 mm long, 400 grams.
Smaller ax 155 mm long, 220 grams.
Hole 17 mm.
Unfortunately ....... I made them with the help of modern tools .....
d.jpg
c.jpg
b.jpg
a.jpg
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Bill Skinner
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Bill Skinner
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Joined: May 1st, 2011, 3:00 am

January 14th, 2018, 5:18 pm #6

How is that unfortunate?  You just abraded faster than if you had done it by hand.  

Making and testing the ancient tools is a very interesting way to try to figure out some of the limits and capabilities of the older tools.  Plus, it doesn't hurt as bad when you break it because you don't have the same amount of time invested as the ancients did.

Instead of walking around in circles, kicking rocks and cursing for an hour like the ancients did, we only do it for 15-20 minutes...
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DuxDawg
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DuxDawg
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Joined: December 1st, 2013, 9:12 pm

January 14th, 2018, 9:13 pm #7

Very nice Ibor. Welcome and thank you for sharing. 

Right on Bill. Well said. 
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Quest for fire
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Quest for fire
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Joined: March 22nd, 2007, 6:19 am

January 14th, 2018, 9:55 pm #8

Ibor the first picture I saw made me think they were modern forged metal tools.
Lovely tools,well done,well done.

I make primitive arrows by both hand and with power tools.
Of course the ones I made by hand meant more but
using modern tools helped me to learn how.
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lawooten
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lawooten
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Joined: September 30th, 2009, 3:30 pm

February 17th, 2018, 5:31 am #9

Please post more pics of the things you make.
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Quillsnkiko
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Quillsnkiko
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Joined: June 22nd, 2006, 8:25 am

February 17th, 2018, 6:00 pm #10

i THOUGHT THOSE WERE METAL  until I read the text. Just beautiful no matter how they were made.  Please feel free to post more pictures....Ibor. Quills
" You can't stop the waves .... but, you can learn to surf."
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Ibor
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Ibor
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Joined: January 11th, 2018, 9:23 pm

February 17th, 2018, 9:02 pm #11

Thank you for the kind words!

I'm working on a few things now for some time I'll give photos for sure.
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Quest for fire
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Quest for fire
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Joined: March 22nd, 2007, 6:19 am

February 19th, 2018, 2:57 pm #12

Ibor,is it hard to scrape the inside of the face?
What tools do you use to do it?
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Ibor
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Ibor
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February 19th, 2018, 4:34 pm #13

Ibor,is it hard to scrape the inside of the face????
.....does not understand...
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Quest for fire
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Quest for fire
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Joined: March 22nd, 2007, 6:19 am

February 20th, 2018, 4:47 pm #14

Sorry Ibor,I wasn't very clear.
You scrape the inside of the face of the wild boar to clean it.
What tools fo you use?
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Ibor
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Ibor
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February 21st, 2018, 4:24 pm #15

You ask what cut the meat is wild boar?
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DuxDawg
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DuxDawg
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February 22nd, 2018, 4:57 pm #16

I believe that what Quest is after is: 

When tanning (making leather with) the hides (skin) of boar (wild pig), what tools do you use to scrape (remove the fat and flesh from) the face? Is it difficult? 
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Ibor
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Ibor
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Joined: January 11th, 2018, 9:23 pm

February 22nd, 2018, 5:26 pm #17

I use a knife.
Roe deer do not have fat so they dry quickly.
Wild boars have a lot of fat, but it's also not a problem, because as I wrote earlier, I nails them to the barn and the sun smears all the fat .... in the winter the titmouse pokes him a lot!
If You want, I can put pictures.
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ateyo
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ateyo
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Joined: December 11th, 2014, 9:30 pm

February 25th, 2018, 6:53 pm #18

Welcome Ibor. That is some beautiful granite. I too, thought they were steel tools. Please, please! Post more pics!

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Ibor
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Ibor
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Joined: January 11th, 2018, 9:23 pm

February 25th, 2018, 7:23 pm #19

Wizard's shed - Winter
a.jpg
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ateyo
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ateyo
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Joined: December 11th, 2014, 9:30 pm

February 26th, 2018, 2:51 am #20

Ibor wrote:Wizard's shed - Winter
Brrrrr(shivers)
In my part of the planet, snow is a novelty! So - this is were the magic happens, yes?! Even in the wintertime?
Ateyo


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