Anyone know of the Heal All herb?

Quest for fire
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Quest for fire
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December 7th, 2017, 12:06 am #1

Prunella Vulgaris is supposed to be good for arthritis.
One big toe in pain is bad enough but two is is getting to be two too many.
I fit the symptoms for arthritis. Of course a doctor gets the final say but
for the now I would like to try it.

All Heal seems to grow along paths. That is what the Net says anyway.
It's too late in the year to hunt it down outside but you never know it may be available in a tea.

Anyone know of it or it's properties?

Below are pic's of the pretty little plant.

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DuxDawg
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December 7th, 2017, 4:14 am #2

Been using P. vulgaris for years for minor wounds. Yarrow and broadleaf plantain are my mainstays for wounds, yet Heal All gets added into poultices with them when time allows. Hereabouts there is either a ton or none of it depending upon the location. 

Don't remember it being used for arthritis. But then that's not something I'm dealing with... yet. 

Speaking of tea, wonder if there are any healing properties left in the dead standing? Seems to me plants take all the good stuff out when allowed to go dormant naturally. (As far as nutritionally and medicinally. Though on the other hand that makes what's left better for cordage or fire.) Quite easy to find Heal All even now. At least until the snow stays. 

Now I am curious how it will hold an ember, catch a spark and taste as tea. Hopefully time permits. 

As a side note, I also use all three as potherbs and additions to salads. For some odd reason I enjoy chewing on yarrow. Well, they don't make any worthwhile gum anymore, thus had to figure something out. Man! Used to get through a week of chewing on one or two pieces of Wrigley's Doublemint gum. Alas, no more.  :( 

Happy Trails One and All! 

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Buckskin Ken
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December 9th, 2017, 4:58 am #3

The roots should have the highest concentration of the good stuff. I live in NC and our yard is shaded so Prunella is the dominant plant in the spring and most of summer. Even now there is a small green rosette of leaves hugging the ground where each root is.  We use it like purple coneflower as an immune system enhancer and general tonic. I would give it a try for joint pain. 
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Quest for fire
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December 9th, 2017, 1:09 pm #4

Buckskin Ken wrote: The roots should have the highest concentration of the good stuff. I live in NC and our yard is shaded so Prunella is the dominant plant in the spring and most of summer. Even now there is a small green rosette of leaves hugging the ground where each root is.  We use it like purple coneflower as an immune system enhancer and general tonic. I would give it a try for joint pain. 
Thanks Buckskin and DuxDawg,😀there is a herbalist up here that may well have it.
She is completely on the other side of town diagonally but her shop is well worth the effort.
Next Summer I will try to track it down in the wild.

Quest for Fire

P.S.

DuxDawg?
I feel for ya brother.
Just two generations ago poorer folk used to chew bits of tar roofers and street layers would discard.
For some reason I am thinking of a licorice flavored gum.🤔 Maybe we should look into making some.
It would be better than the food grade polymer garbage we are supposed to chew these days.
As far as I am concerned they could tar a road with the stuff.🤐😮🤐

P.P.S.

I found a couple of lists of ingredients that look to make nice gum.
The recipe on how to use the ingredients wouldn't copy or link but
it would be easy enough to find them again. They look like fun recipés to follow.
Isn't it neat? The last gum only has one ingredient.😀

Below the ingredients are pictures of gum pods and
other items aside from chewables you can make with the Sweet Gum.

Natural Beeswax Gum
  • 1/2 cup beeswax (make sure it's food grade)
  • 1 cup powdered sugar
  • 3 tablespoons honey
  • Peppermint or cinnamon extract
Minimalist Sweet Sap Gum
  • Sweet gum sap
GotGumballs.jpg
DSC09850_00.jpg
90bd2173d48ac6c53ba83d54bf21e6f8--sweet-gum-nature-crafts.jpg
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DuxDawg
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December 14th, 2017, 4:35 am #5

Have yet to find Sweet Gum hereabouts. Saw quite a few visiting friends in the Quad Cities years ago. (They live in Moline, IL and Rock Island, IA.) Very cool wreath! 

When I've chewed combs straight from the hive the wax has been flaky and coated my mouth. Not real fun. Perhaps melting in order to mix the other ingredients changes that?? 

Interesting Ken. Will look into using the roots for tea. 
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Quest for fire
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December 14th, 2017, 7:46 pm #6

I remember candies in my youth that were liquid in a translucent wax cigar.
You chose your flavor,bit the end off the cigar and drank the sweet prize inside.
You could chew the wax as a way to be sure you got every drop.
I sure hope it wasn't a petro-chemical wax.🤐

I used to get honey straight from the farmer.
You would occasionaly get a bee in your honey.😮
At one dollar a pound I didn't complain about the bee in nonpasteurised honey.
I do think the honey and heat would make the beeswax more liquid.
It may still stick a bit but would taste great while you got it unstuck.
Maybe one day if I still have some teeth I will give it a try.

As far as sweetgum goes I had never heard about it around here only read of it in books.
It sure sounds like a nice treat. I wonder if there are vitamins,minerals or micronutrients in there.

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Chippintuff
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December 20th, 2017, 2:56 am #7

I chewed sweetgum sap a few times when I was a kid. It stuck to my teeth a little, but the flavor was nice and spicey (I don't mean hot like pepper).

WA
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Quillsnkiko
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December 21st, 2017, 2:28 am #8

Dux....that's interesting Moline, IL is just maybe 50 miles south of me and my Aunt used to live in East Moline. I have a good friend who lives in Colona....right by Moline...so will have to see if shes ever seen sweet gum down there. Ive driven around in Moline & Rock Island and never saw any myself.But that don't mean much. I know there are sure a lot of Teasel down there along some roads. Quills
" You can't stop the waves .... but, you can learn to surf."
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Quillsnkiko
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December 21st, 2017, 2:31 am #9

Quest...I can remember those wax tubes filled with colored sweet liquid. I have a idea back then it was paraffin....for sure...maybe mixed with something else to make it chew-able. I never liked chewing on the wax part myself.  There was a variety store about 2 blocks from my house and I would stop there on my way to school if I had any pennys. Quills
" You can't stop the waves .... but, you can learn to surf."
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Quest for fire
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December 21st, 2017, 3:30 am #10

Quillsnkiko wrote: Quest...I can remember those wax tubes filled with colored sweet liquid. I have a idea back then it was paraffin....for sure...maybe mixed with something else to make it chew-able. I never liked chewing on the wax part myself.  There was a variety store about 2 blocks from my house and I would stop there on my way to school if I had any pennys. Quills
Sweet times dear lady sweet times.😊
About that time there was this shredded sweetened coconut you could get.
For some reason I seem to remember it being sold as Popeye's spinach.
Does it ring a bell?
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