Anyone tried raccoon?

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Anyone tried raccoon?

Quest for fire
Registered User
Joined: 22 Mar 2007, 06:19

28 Oct 2017, 20:24 #1

Raccoons up my way are more evident in the city than the countryside.
I have only ever seen one in the wild. It was asleep up in the crotch of a tree.
Good thing I didn't have my bow and a small game permit.😉

In the city I wouldn't eat one as they eat garbage.
You sometimes see them in the early morning on garbage night.

I am wondering what they taste like.
Anyone tried the little masked bandits?

Below are a couple of recipes.
One mentions cloves that I do not particularly like.
You never know,maybe they go well with Raton Laveur. (The rat that washes)

Below that are a few gifs.
I would get along with he one that gets tossed on the sofa.
Excepting I would toss it in the Crock. 😊


Crock Pot Raccoon
Via MitchSmithOutdoorsRecipes.com
Ingredients:
  • 1 Large Raccoon
  • 1 Large Onion
  • 2 Stalks of Celery
  • 1 Large Green Bell Pepper
  • 4 Bay Leaves
  • 1 Can French Onion Soup
  • 1 Can Cream of Mushroom Soup
  • Salt and Pepper to taste
  • Water
Directions:
Dress the raccoon:
  1. Thoroughly wash the raccoon under cold running water.
  2. Cut into quarters.
  3. Sprinkle it with salt and pepper to taste.
  4. Stick whole clove in the meat about an inch apart.
  5. Slice the onions into quarters.
  6. Finely chop up celery and bell pepper.
Cook the raccoon:
  1. Thoroughly wash the raccoon under cold running water.
  2. Place raccoon in the crock pot.
  3. Crumble up the bay leaves and sprinkle over the meat.
  4. Add the onion, celery and bell pepper add to pot.
  5. Mix onion soup, mushroom soup and water together and pour into the pot.
  6. Turn the crock pot on high for 30 minutes.
  7. Reduce the heat to low.
  8. Cook for 6 – 8 hours or overnight.
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Last edited by Quest for fire on 29 Oct 2017, 19:03, edited 1 time in total.
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Chippintuff
Registered User
Joined: 21 Jan 2011, 00:25

28 Oct 2017, 22:10 #2

When I was a kid many years ago, my great uncle killed one, and my grandmother cooked it for us. One bite was enough for me. Greasy meat.

WA
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Quillsnkiko
Registered User
Joined: 22 Jun 2006, 08:25

28 Oct 2017, 23:51 #3

I've tried it twice....Did not care for it. Once I tried cooking one....do not remember exactly what it tasted like but did not like it at all. Yes very greasy. Possum to. Yuk.If I was starving...I could probably eat it.

 I've been told there is a Black church in the town I am from where they cook a fall harvest feast and Raccoon is often on the menu if you get there early enough.

Always wanted to get there but never have got the job done.  I have a friend who traps...he will eat beaver & woodchuck..but tosses the coon carcasses for Eagles to eat.Quills
" You can't stop the waves .... but, you can learn to surf."
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Quest for fire
Registered User
Joined: 22 Mar 2007, 06:19

29 Oct 2017, 12:01 #4

Am I right in presuming your trapper friend has tried raccoon?

All I know of is from reading an account of natives dipping
other kinds of game meat in hot raccoon fat. One day if I get
the chance a raccoon is going to get ventilated and cooked.
If I don't like it Tracker will. 😉

Below are a few gifs of the cute little devils doing what they do best.

Quest for Fire
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Quillsnkiko
Registered User
Joined: 22 Jun 2006, 08:25

29 Oct 2017, 16:49 #5

I have them stealing cat food like that from my outside cats...have seen it many's a time. Cats will eat right along side of a possum but are a Little more leery of a coon...but still not afraid...more like they are guarding their food against it rather then sharing.LOL!~! 
Next time I see him I will have to ask him....I know hes boarded up plenty of coon skins....and uses a lot of cheap paper towel to blot up the fat that oozes out of them while they are drying.... even if .....they have been well fleshed. I ground up a bunch of beaver for him once before he had a meat grinder....and he brought wood chuck to a rendezvous...and cooked it on the fire. I liked the ground beaver made into burgers...but did not like the wood chuck.But it was not ground it was whole pieces. I remember the possum well ...I baked that. darn thing had been killing my chickens....and I got revenge...but the big dogs I had got it all. I don't remember now how I tried cooking the coon for sure...I think it may have been a older one as it was strong...I think baked in the oven with cream of mushroom soup after it had been browned.At that point in time I had my own home grown meat...pigs , goat & several lambs.I've never cared much for lamb...leg of lamb was fair....lamb chops ...yuk. Just do not care for the taste.I was trying everything back then.Either grew or hunted everything that went in the freezer. Anything humans did not like was relished by my dogs. I had 11 at one time. A herd of goats..2 milk cows,2-3  pigs raised on lots of milk....( best pork you ever tasted ) chickens, and a huge garden. I sure miss that person who could do all that. LOL!~!  Like my Avatar...Kiko...gone but not forgotten.Quills
" You can't stop the waves .... but, you can learn to surf."
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river rat
Registered User
Joined: 25 Nov 2015, 15:24

04 Nov 2017, 12:38 #6

i poked one with a arrow once. skinned , cleaned it. let it soak in one part vinager to ten parts of water a hour or two. then froze it. a few weeks later i seasoned and bbq'ed it in a slow cooker for like 6 hours. still tough when i took it out. very gamey taste with a "garbage" taste after taste. i did not like it. but i ate it. if i kill it, i eat it. thats why you will never see a post from me shooting a opossum. lol i still get coons from time to time....they make good dogfood i guess. but i wont eat them any more. my dogs do though. on that note, i wont feed my dogs a opossum, i like my dogs lol i like coon skins for lots of reasons though, only reason i get one once in awhile any more.
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Quest for fire
Registered User
Joined: 22 Mar 2007, 06:19

04 Nov 2017, 20:36 #7

Hey River Rat,good to see you.
Yes I too eat what I kill,feed it to my dog or use it for bait.
Outside the mistakes of a youth that is. We were all young once.
It behooves the wise to profit from it.

Was that 'coon you ate city bred?
I mean did it eat garbage?

The first thirty five years of my life I wanted a 'coon skin hat.
Now I prefer something not so ostentatious. Where I live,
you would be best not to traipse in the woods with one on.
Some idjit with more muscles than brains is likely to ventilate it.😑

I will put the idea of eating a rat that washes on the back-burner.
Unless I run out of dog food. 😉

Quest for Fire
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river rat
Registered User
Joined: 25 Nov 2015, 15:24

05 Nov 2017, 22:41 #8

it wasnt a city coon. but did it eat garbage? i mean whats left here as for wilderness is a few sparse woods and farm land. it may have.i was on the outskirts of a farm when i got it.i had a sweet coon hat. and boots, and gloves lol .i still make stuff like that once in awhile.it dont last forever. if i make it its because im going to use it. i already need to make bottoms for those mocs i built not too long ago. got a hole in the heal.nothin lasts forever. but you can mend it and make it last a little longer.
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DuxDawg
Registered User
Joined: 01 Dec 2013, 21:12

16 Nov 2017, 14:47 #9

Possum is not my favorite table fare. Tends to be rubbery, greasy and have a bit of an unpleasant taste. 

I have found coon to be decent. Certainly by way of comparison to the above! Stronger flavor than pork, though often utilized as a substitute for such. Very fatty, especially in Autumn. Literally 1-1/2" thick layer of fat on some. They say there are glands just below the elbow and knees that impart a foul flavor to the meat. I have found fatty deposits there, which I habitually remove. 

Fairly easy to trap, great fun over dogs or calls, very numerous and prolific, with very useful hides. (A nice compromise between too large and tough to work as a side project, yet still large and durable enough to make many projects worthwhile. After we have gotten all that fat off, anyhow!) A great place for young 'uns to start, I'd say. 

As with all meat, grilling over a smoky fire yields more desirable results. Only then adding to stew, casserole, etc is my preference when not consumed directly. 

The aging of meat has somehow slipped by the wayside these days. Tragically in my opinion. Properly done it is safe and yields simply amazing results. Here is an excellent link upon that very subject:  
https://honest-food.net/on-hanging-pheasants-2/

I too agree that we ought to honor the life we have harvested by utilizing the empty shell left behind as best we can. 

As always, enjoyable sharing experiences with y'all! 
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DuxDawg
Registered User
Joined: 01 Dec 2013, 21:12

20 Nov 2017, 16:48 #10

How many of us knew about removing the scent glands before cooking raccoons? Not to call you out RR, but it sounds like you did not remove those glands. 

That is the #1 cause of people not liking the taste of coon.  

As we can see in the vid below, on coons the glands look like fat. Since coons are super fatty to begin with, this makes finding the glands extra difficult. Plus those glands are small and in between muscles where most might not be looking. Not like the large anal glands of skunks, squirrels, etc nor like the obvious (by color, size and smell) glands of large herd ungulates (deer, elk, etc) that many may be more familiar with. 

#2 is not trimming as much fat off as possible. Fat from most wild critters goes rancid more quickly than that of hogs or cattle. Fat turns long before the meat does. Foul fat will impart a strong unpleasant flavor even after turning only slightly bad. 

#3 is improper handling of the meat. 

Biggest mistake most make there is cooling the carcass neither quickly nor thoroughly enough. Other mistakes include contamination from contact with the ground or organs (piercing intestines, gall bladder, etc then failing to clean and trim adequately). Appears to me that most treat their game like store bought (i.e. previously frozen or refrigerated) meat. When in reality most critters have internal temps above 100°F. We need to get it at least below 55°F as quickly as possible, and colder is better. 

Another common food handling mistake is incorrect freezing. Have warned far too many about rotating fresh meat put into a freezer. They put all the meat from a Whitetailed deer fresh from being butchered at nearly room temperature in one big pile in their freezer. Then think that's all the the attention it needs until they pull some out to thaw. 

What happens is the packages of meat around the pile freeze nicely. All appears to be hunky dory. However, the outer packages insulate the inner ones. Even several weeks later the inner packages may not be frozen yet. So the inner ones rot, turn green, stink horribly, etc and 2/3 of that deer gets thrown out. Such a waste!!! Freezing in a single layer is best. Rotating the innermost packages to the outside every 8-12 hours for the first fews days would avoid the entire fiasco. 



Anyhow, here is a good vid that takes us from trapping to skinning to cooking and finally to the best part... eating!   :D  



Back to the glands. I've known about the four armpit glands for many years. The guys are correct that when fresh those glands are greenish or yellowish - definitely much easier to distinguish from fat. They turn whitish after being dead a while. (Haven't timed it but I think it takes more than a day.) Much more difficult to find when white. 

Interestingly groundhog glands are reddish. Can't remember if that was fresh, old or both. Do remember thinking they were an unusual color. Much as the marrow of woodcock is a striking salmon egg orange when raw. Those crazy timberdoodles!!  lol 

Hadn't heard of the six organ (spine?) glands until watching this vid a couple months ago. Do always trim all the fat off, so must have removed them unintentionally. 
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Quillsnkiko
Registered User
Joined: 22 Jun 2006, 08:25

21 Nov 2017, 05:06 #11

Hmmmm Hanging game birds for days with the innards inside....Not something I would care for .Often the innards are punctured by shot...intestines leak.....
etc.  I knew a old guy who hunted ducks  on the river when I was a kid and he hung ducks...guts inside for a week. I never ate at his house. We always gutted them as soon as we got them plucked and singed....I can still smell that smell of singed duck or other bird.Of course I hunted them for a long time after I was a kid. Leaving the guts inside is just not something...I would care to do ...myself. Quills
" You can't stop the waves .... but, you can learn to surf."
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Quillsnkiko
Registered User
Joined: 22 Jun 2006, 08:25

21 Nov 2017, 05:11 #12

I will have to ask Dave what he thinks of coon. He told me last week he may not trap for Muskrats this year as they are only selling for a buck seventy five. Not sure about coon. Last night 2 possums were on my front step....eating cat food and some ham fat....the cats left. One ran for the barn  run....waddling as fast as it little feet could carry its fat body.That one looked to be a young one...the other one was twice as big. Quills
" You can't stop the waves .... but, you can learn to surf."
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DuxDawg
Registered User
Joined: 01 Dec 2013, 21:12

21 Nov 2017, 13:24 #13

It is true we must extremely carefully examine the critter for damage before embarking upon aging. That being said, don't pass up aged meat. Done right the flavor and tenderness are unsurpassed! The best that species can achieve. 

At my previous residence I had a little dorm fridge set up solely for aging wild game. High end steak houses age their beef. That good. 

Sadly fur prices are dismal and have been for some time. I have nuisance trapped for decades. Played around with fur trapping off and on. Grew up hearing stories of guys making a living trapping in the 1970s. The way things are going that art will be dead inside fifty years. Sad. 

Happy Thanksgiving to one and all!! 
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