Live In An Ancient Food Forest

For discussion related to the Paleolithic encampment - Building structures, materials, methods of construction, tools and other items around the camp/home.

Live In An Ancient Food Forest

Tomas
Registered User
Joined: 10 Apr 2013, 22:24

10 Sep 2017, 23:12 #1

Hello Folks

Why not live in an ancient style food forest apropos to your region....set up a tipi ....put in some self sustaining irrigation canals ... stock canals with apropos fish ... set up several tipis even rent some out ...you are now golden.





All The Best

Tomas
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Quest for fire
Registered User
Joined: 22 Mar 2007, 06:19

12 Sep 2017, 16:39 #2

Nice idea Tomas.
I like Tipi living but have only ever weekended in one.
The owner of the tipi and land ran a farmed wild turkey
hunt among many other activities. He also made wonderful laminated Ash bows.
He sold me the least expensive,prettiest bow in the world. 😀
And no I am not biased. 😉

Quest for Fire
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Robson Valley
Registered User
Joined: 24 Apr 2015, 00:27

12 Sep 2017, 21:14 #3

As a hunter gatherer, I would look for my best campsite first and optimize what I've got.
Rather than hike for miles for food, I would next begin to bring the valuable plants home.
A 'food forest' can be so many things.

I did that in the city = dug up all sorts of top quality wild berry bushes and brought them home to look after.
Best in terms of energy efficiency.  A pleasure to harvest.
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JohnB842
Registered User
Joined: 13 Sep 2017, 12:38

15 Sep 2017, 22:47 #4

Tomas wrote: Hello Folks

Why not live in an ancient style food forest apropos to your region....set up a tipi ....put in some self sustaining irrigation canals ... stock canals with apropos fish ... set up several tipis even rent some out ...you are now golden.





All The Best

Tomas
I like the idea, but I think a yurt would be better in areas with colder climates. Less overhead space with heat being wasted.
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Robson Valley
Registered User
Joined: 24 Apr 2015, 00:27

16 Sep 2017, 02:17 #5

Paleo history shows that many cultures lived in both summer camps and winter camps. 
Or some such version which satisfied a great need like an autumn salmon fishing and preserving camp.
Across western North America, winter camps of pit houses were not uncommon. 
4'-6' below grade with 2+' earth on the roof, their survival is evidence of the value.
Haida on the coast needed cedar plank houses because of the great rainfall totals.  No yurt nor tipi would last a season.

Clearly the housing met the vagaries of climate around the wworld.
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Tomas
Registered User
Joined: 10 Apr 2013, 22:24

16 Sep 2017, 15:06 #6

Hello Folks

Hmmmm first it is always good to know that ancient ancestors used a wide variety of materials and methods in their indigenous architecture.

However one of the most versatile was and is the conical skin lodge used in some form in virtually every ecology on the planet and likely the oldest type of nomadic or settled shelter type used by ancient people.

Essentially a water proof membrane made from a wide variety of materials it's tensile strength and lightness is key to its' success as a shelter. Various moisture proof materials treated with oils and tannins makes it impervious to various forms of decay. Historical accounts testify to it's use in all seasons, ecologies, climates and durability over many years.

All The Best

Tomas
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Robson Valley
Registered User
Joined: 24 Apr 2015, 00:27

16 Sep 2017, 15:35 #7

There was nothing on Haida Gwaii to use for tipi skin.  The black-tail Columbia deer are a recent introduction.

Western Red Cedar is so vastly superior in the west coast climate that the Haida
took their house boards with them when they changed seasonal camps.  Why not?
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Tomas
Registered User
Joined: 10 Apr 2013, 22:24

16 Sep 2017, 21:50 #8

Hello Folks

It is certainly good the ancestors had portable architecture of varied materials.... as for the conical skin lodge materials.... seal hide skin lodge anyone....;-)


https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/ ... m_1915.JPG

https://i.pinimg.com/736x/7a/ac/0c/7aac ... s-tent.jpg

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Robson Valley
Registered User
Joined: 24 Apr 2015, 00:27

17 Sep 2017, 04:52 #9

I'm more interested in the observations and findings and measurements made by Franz Boas.
In part during the Jesup North Pacific Expedition of 1897 - 1902.

Why not admit to the Haida houses of 40' x 100' and cedar planked?
That their boats of 40' - 60' easily carried the house boards to seasonal camps.
There are far darker elements of Haida house constructions which need no discussion.

Wild seals.  What multipurpose functions do the Haida record for those?
Halibut were more useful.  Seals, a thousand miles north?  Yes, most certainly.
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Tomas
Registered User
Joined: 10 Apr 2013, 22:24

17 Sep 2017, 16:58 #10

Robson Valley wrote: I'm more interested in the observations and findings and measurements made by Franz Boas.
In part during the Jesup North Pacific Expedition of 1897 - 1902.

Why not admit to the Haida houses of 40' x 100' and cedar planked?
That their boats of 40' - 60' easily carried the house boards to seasonal camps.
There are far darker elements of Haida house constructions which need no discussion.

Wild seals.  What multipurpose functions do the Haida record for those?
Halibut were more useful.  Seals, a thousand miles north?  Yes, most certainly.
Hello Robson Valley

Thank you for continuing to share you knowledge of Haida Gwaii it is most fascinating .

Thought you might enjoy this site that gives some architectural details of Haida construction.


http://www.sfu.ca/archaeology-old/museu ... using.html

All The Best

Tomas

PS There is no doubt the Haida people knew the best architecture for their ecology...the points about the conical skin lodge (tipi) is to simply show it's rather universal adaptability to various climates and ecologies.
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