potted Purslane

Identification, cultivation, harvesting, preparing, preserving, recipies, general ethnobotany... Disclaimer: Don't experiment with unknown plants, or rely on the information in this forum. Get your own information and use CAUTION!
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potted Purslane

river rat
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river rat
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August 29th, 2017, 12:33 pm #1

found a small twig of this growing in a crack between the bricks in the middle of our street this past spring/summer. transplanted it and now its been a hanging munchy ever since.
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DuxDawg
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September 4th, 2017, 1:56 am #2

I too have potted purslane. Quite enjoyable to eat. 
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Quest for fire
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Quest for fire
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September 6th, 2017, 8:22 pm #3

I wonder what Purslane tastes like.

Due to an incredibly wet Summer with very litte sunshine my friend's tomatos were a no show. Maybe next year he will go for semi-shade loving herbs and greens.
Any ideas on what to plant?

Quest for Fire
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river rat
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river rat
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September 7th, 2017, 9:28 am #4

some things that could of been done about them tomatoes....soon as it flowered. take a q tip. touch the middle of each flower carefully. soon as it flowered, add some epsom salt to the soil the plants are growing in. dig water run offs/ditches around the plants. this way the water runs away from the plants. itll hold in the run offs and the tomatoes will throw out roots to gain enough water. greens are a good idea but too much water is never good. id try raised beds simply because you can control how much water gets in them.
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Quest for fire
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September 7th, 2017, 12:37 pm #5

I will mention the q-tip trick to my buddy.

I looked up Purslane on the Net and
it mentioned finding it exactly where you found it.
In a crack on a cement sidewalk.
I guess Purslane must be a tough little plant able to survive in
the tiniest fissures Nature makes in fertile defiance of the concrete jungle. ūüėČ

Quest for Fire
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river rat
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river rat
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September 7th, 2017, 9:06 pm #6

yep
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DuxDawg
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September 8th, 2017, 1:16 am #7

Purslane loves the heat. It only comes out when it gets in the 80s around here. So plant your purslane in the warmest spots you have. I put my planters along the south side of the house in full sun. 

Cheers! 
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river rat
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river rat
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September 11th, 2017, 5:00 pm #8

been munching on it alot. hoping theres some left to bring inside this fall .lol
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DuxDawg
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September 12th, 2017, 10:02 pm #9

Now there's a thought! Purslane all year long.  :D 
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boletus
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September 14th, 2017, 3:35 pm #10

We get a lot of that around here in the summertime... Supposedly it has omega fatty acids just like fish if I remember correctly. Tasty stuff, kinda reminds me of raw nopales.

Looks like you got started with the Christmas spirit early this year.. :D. Ambitious. Hehehe
-Jason
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Quillsnkiko
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September 15th, 2017, 12:30 am #11

sometimes in my garden the purlsane is so thick and succulent...and covers the ground...can be a darn pest.It comes up in the cracks of my old uneven side walk....that and moss roses...which its related to I think. I have pulled pounds of the stuff.Very seldom have eaten any. How do you eat it Dux? You are right it likes heat....the hotter it is the better it grows. Quills
" You can't stop the waves .... but, you can learn to surf."
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Hhop
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September 16th, 2017, 3:34 am #12

It can be a nuisance when growing where not wanted, but is a tasty snack. The only way I have eaten it, is to just pick it and eat it. It would probably make a tasty addition to a salad or other dished. Has anyone cooked it or just picked and eaten it fresh?
"You don't have to stop playing when you get old, but you get old when you stop playing."
http://hhopsnaturewalk.blogspot.com/
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boletus
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September 16th, 2017, 4:16 am #13

Only eaten it fresh, myself. I would like to pickle some thick stems someday and give that a shot. They have the texture for it.
-Jason
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Quillsnkiko
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September 16th, 2017, 4:25 am #14

I think Forager said it got slimey somewhat cooked.
" You can't stop the waves .... but, you can learn to surf."
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Forager
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September 16th, 2017, 8:26 pm #15

I enjoy it fresh as an addition to salad.  I'll also stir still-steaming boiled cubes of red potatoes over Purslane mixed with other fresh wild greens and cover this with a lid until it's cooled to room temperature - this wilts the greens enough to make them a bit more tender while preserving their strong nutritional values... dress this with some vinegar and olive oil, toss in some chopped sun dried tomatos, a grind of black pepper and a sprinkle of salt and... my mouth is watering for this even as I describe it.

Pickling the thick segments of stems works quite well; their somewhat tart flavor agrees with the brine and the texture of raw stems also works.  The additional brine ingredients of spices and some select herbs is a nice complement but the visual presentation of the pickled stem is pretty stark.  I've always chosen segments which had leaves to 'dress' the pickle beyond a simple fat stem.

I have tried cooking it a few different ways but to my palate it took on a pronounced vinegary flavor, and yes the texture left something to be desired, as Quills mentioned (a slimy context in vegetables on their own is repulsive).  Just as well, I understand that the nutritional values are higher if this plant is eaten uncooked (or just wilted as described).

Purslane is unique, distinctive among edible plants, and nutritionally great - one of the few Omega 3 plants (Black Walnut is another), has a long gathering season and is persistent - ask anybody who misinterprets this wild gift as a 'nuisance' in their garden or lawn.  I'm always glad just to see it, whether erupting in a lawn or sprawling from a crack in a walkway during the most harsh conditions of summer... it speaks of a vitality and determination to thrive under the most adverse of situations.  And in this aspect we may also benefit, for what it might suggest to us about the conduct of our own lives.
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DuxDawg
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September 22nd, 2017, 9:38 pm #16

As for me, mostly raw straight or in salads. Cooked it is even more slimy than okra! Should pickle it someday, that intrigues me. 

Cheers! 
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river rat
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September 23rd, 2017, 9:20 am #17

i like it raw as a nibble, or in salads. works well added to soups stews or stir fries for me.
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