Leftover Bedframe Recycling

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Leftover Bedframe Recycling

Araverus
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Araverus
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Joined: April 22nd, 2017, 9:29 pm

April 25th, 2017, 11:45 pm #1

I've had some rusted out bedframes sitting out in my yard for a while (about 6 2ft pieces), and thought of making a sword from them. Problem though: I haven't found a good steeling recipe to use for unknown metal values (e.g., resistance, flexibility, etc.). Any suggestions?
Dreams are distant yew trees, and hope is a short osprey among them.
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Joined: April 1st, 2006, 10:11 pm

June 27th, 2017, 4:33 pm #2

I'm not sure what you are asking. Junkyard steel is a crapshoot. Bed frame material is sometimes medium carbon steel, although there are no guarantees. Cut off a small piece, heat it to a medium orange, quench it in water, and see how it reacts to a file. If it is appreciably harder than it was, you have something you can probably work with. If it cracks in the quench, you have something you can probably work with. I'd temper to at least 450 to start with, and work from there.

The problem with a sword as a first project is that if you screw up the heat treat you can have a big chunk of sharp steel go flying when you hit something, which is extremely dangerous. And that's an even bigger concern with scrap steel. I'd suggest you experiment with several smaller blades first, and test them extensively, to get a sense of how to handle that particular steel.

http://paleoplanet69529.yuku.com/topic/ ... st-results


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Matt
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forginhill
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Joined: July 5th, 2006, 1:07 pm

June 27th, 2017, 8:12 pm #3

I use bed frame for smaller tools and knives. I don't think it would have the thickness necessary for a sword, though. What about a leaf spring? It's a known steel (5160) and you have the material you need to forge a sword. Making a sword is a lot of work, so it seems to make sense to get as much going toward success as possible.

(Good to see you posting again, Dad One!)
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Joined: April 1st, 2006, 10:11 pm

June 27th, 2017, 9:14 pm #4

Yes, good point about the thickness as well.
Matt
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Joined: April 1st, 2006, 10:11 pm

June 27th, 2017, 9:34 pm #5

As far as posting again, thanks. I feel like I should shut up until I actually produce something from steel again, after all this time. But I guess I still remember some things.
Matt
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forginhill
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forginhill
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Joined: July 5th, 2006, 1:07 pm

July 3rd, 2017, 9:37 pm #6

Hey, you could always dance circles around me with your knowledge. Whether you're makin stuff or not, I'm glad you're posting...
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toxophileken
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toxophileken
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Joined: January 15th, 2006, 4:55 am

July 4th, 2017, 3:38 am #7

Yes, always glad to see you, Matt!

Ken
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Joined: April 1st, 2006, 10:11 pm

July 5th, 2017, 8:23 pm #8

Thanks, Ken. It's been a long time.
Matt
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wolfhawaii
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wolfhawaii
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Joined: December 2nd, 2005, 2:18 am

July 6th, 2018, 9:09 am #9

Bed frames are handy for reutilizing; last year i made a small utility trailer to tow behind my riding mower for hauling yard debris etc. from a bed frame; i also made part of the hinges on my new foundry from the brackets on the corner of the bed frame. Some kind of utility knife might be ok from bed frame, but as said above, you never really know what you have as it is not standardized material. Try some (safe) experiments and see what you get.
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lawrenwimberly
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lawrenwimberly
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Joined: July 3rd, 2018, 3:34 pm

July 6th, 2018, 5:42 pm #10

Most older bedframes were made of recycled RR rail... roughly 1080 with high manganese... the influx of cheap chinesium bedframes in the last 20 years has made that iffy... Same goes for spring steel... what was once 1095 or 5160 can now be 9140, 4140, or any number of other high alloy, relatively low carbon steels
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wolfhawaii
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wolfhawaii
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Joined: December 2nd, 2005, 2:18 am

July 6th, 2018, 8:49 pm #11

Lawren! long time! How is it going with you? Nice to see you on here again.....Steve
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lawrenwimberly
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lawrenwimberly
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Joined: July 3rd, 2018, 3:34 pm

July 7th, 2018, 10:34 pm #12

I'm doin better... lotta surg and several moves... settled in here in Illinois, starting to build my smithy from scratch again... gets harder to do every time... Nice thing is, RR tracks right across the street, and their SPARES piles... RR workers 2 blocks down give me free pick because my Grandpa worked there in the 30's
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wolfhawaii
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wolfhawaii
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Joined: December 2nd, 2005, 2:18 am

July 8th, 2018, 5:46 am #13

Sounds like an awesome spot for a shop. I was at the scrap yard here recently and scored a 5 foot section of heavy rail, which I was surprised to find as we don't have a railway here. Must have come from the shipyard; it will make some good dies.
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lawrenwimberly
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July 8th, 2018, 7:58 pm #14

probably crane rail
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wolfhawaii
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wolfhawaii
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Joined: December 2nd, 2005, 2:18 am

July 9th, 2018, 9:41 pm #15

Either that or the railway they pull the ships out of the water on. It is pretty stout stuff.
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lawrenwimberly
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July 11th, 2018, 10:44 pm #16

wolfhawaii wrote: Either that or the railway they pull the ships out of the water on. It is pretty stout stuff.
the larger the gauge of rail, the higher the carbon content... the 127 lb per foot rail I have is 85 points carbon... larger than that tends to be 90 and above
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wolfhawaii
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wolfhawaii
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July 12th, 2018, 1:45 am #17

good to know... i will get a measurement later and post it.
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lawrenwimberly
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lawrenwimberly
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July 12th, 2018, 11:22 pm #18

Rail gauge is measured in lbs per yard... Mine for instance is 127 lbs for a 3 foot section
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