What Have You Knapped Today........

Manufacture of stone tools, knives and arrowheads by lithic reduction
hixton
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hixton
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April 15th, 2018, 3:15 pm #681

VirginiaKnapper wrote:Just a tip I have learned about quartzite and other fairly non-elastic rocks- support is everything and that it should be supported close to where you are hitting it. I broke one of the only spalls that would have been most suitable to make one out of.
Yes, freeze talks about that. I started thinking about support more seriously about a year ago. Although I was supporting my work before that, I realized that, as I learned, that if I don't support the piece well, the flakes won't run where I want them to. Quartzite is a somewhat softer material so getting a good solid platform is important. Putting a finger tip just back off the edge under the platform protects from putting too much bending force on the thin section of the piece. Avoid too much downward energy on the lip, also makes s big difference. I've become more aware of the opportunity that comes with directing the force into the width of the piece while lightly supporting the edge at the platform.

I may be repeating what you already know, but its taken me a long time to gradually see what's really going on, so I figure it can't hurt.

I used to think that stone tools were just stone tools, but the farther I get into the complexities of how this really works, the greater I appreciate how sophisticated the craftsmen of hundreds, thousands and tens of thousands of years ago were.

Another support is two fingers at the edge so the flake can run between them.

And, use the right weight billet. I've shifted too light and had bad results when thinning.

Finally, because I was just struggling with it. Work both sides evenly. Actually the order of removal is:

Flatten and thin

Thin the ends while you still have mass in the middle

Space out your platforms so the flakes leave ridges for the next run of plakes.

Keep a wavy edge until your are ready to finish up.

Keep even balanced convexity on both sides of the lenticular cross section.

There, now it'll be a piece of cake!



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boletus
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April 15th, 2018, 6:43 pm #682

Stacyharmon wrote:
boletus wrote: Couple of cahokias. Colored novac. I think these are my best work to date..

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Those are some nice looking cahokias. I have broke the last three i have attempted and I am sure its how I hold them.
Is that hand pad domed?

My hand pad is 2 layers of 1/8" cow leather with 4 layers of deerskin on top. Thats what I do all my main pressure work on. Sometimes ill support the work a little differently on it to blast flakes all the way across to get steps off the other side etc.. Its very easy to overshot on it if youre not careful though. The rock with leather on it is very flat and I hold it like a hand pad and use it for notching, serrations and making needle tips (to brace the back edge). It works really well for me when I notch because it keeps the point very stout with a minimum of contact. Im glad you like the points, they are my favorite type.
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willjo
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April 17th, 2018, 1:05 am #683

6 7/8" Coral today
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A bad day hunting arrowheads is better than a good day at work anytime.
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VirginiaKnapper
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April 17th, 2018, 1:56 am #684

hixton wrote:
VirginiaKnapper wrote:Just a tip I have learned about quartzite and other fairly non-elastic rocks- support is everything and that it should be supported close to where you are hitting it. I broke one of the only spalls that would have been most suitable to make one out of.
Yes, freeze talks about that. I started thinking about support more seriously about a year ago. Although I was supporting my work before that, I realized that, as I learned, that if I don't support the piece well, the flakes won't run where I want them to. Quartzite is a somewhat softer material so getting a good solid platform is important. Putting a finger tip just back off the edge under the platform protects from putting too much bending force on the thin section of the piece. Avoid too much downward energy on the lip, also makes s big difference. I've become more aware of the opportunity that comes with directing the force into the width of the piece while lightly supporting the edge at the platform.

I may be repeating what you already know, but its taken me a long time to gradually see what's really going on, so I figure it can't hurt.

I used to think that stone tools were just stone tools, but the farther I get into the complexities of how this really works, the greater I appreciate how sophisticated the craftsmen of hundreds, thousands and tens of thousands of years ago were.

Another support is two fingers at the edge so the flake can run between them.

And, use the right weight billet. I've shifted too light and had bad results when thinning.

Finally, because I was just struggling with it. Work both sides evenly. Actually the order of removal is:

Flatten and thin

Thin the ends while you still have mass in the middle

Space out your platforms so the flakes leave ridges for the next run of plakes.

Keep a wavy edge until your are ready to finish up.

Keep even balanced convexity on both sides of the lenticular cross section.

There, now it'll be a piece of cake!



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Thanks Hixton! That was really helpful; I have a fairly good idea of support when it comes to material such as chert and obsidian, but I have only recently even started to get to know support with quartzite and other non - elastic rocks. Keith Copi (Hummingbird Point) recently gave me one of his points out of quartzite, and I must say that it is, after experiencing so much failure with just thinning and snapping the piece, beyond extraordinary (it is posted below). Also Willjo, that is an amazing point, superb job done.

Frank

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hixton
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April 17th, 2018, 2:31 am #685

VirginiaKnapper wrote:
hixton wrote:
VirginiaKnapper wrote:Just a tip I have learned about quartzite and other fairly non-elastic rocks- support is everything and that it should be supported close to where you are hitting it. I broke one of the only spalls that would have been most suitable to make one out of.
Yes, freeze talks about that. I started thinking about support more seriously about a year ago. Although I was supporting my work before that, I realized that, as I learned, that if I don't support the piece well, the flakes won't run where I want them to. Quartzite is a somewhat softer material so getting a good solid platform is important. Putting a finger tip just back off the edge under the platform protects from putting too much bending force on the thin section of the piece. Avoid too much downward energy on the lip, also makes s big difference. I've become more aware of the opportunity that comes with directing the force into the width of the piece while lightly supporting the edge at the platform.

I may be repeating what you already know, but its taken me a long time to gradually see what's really going on, so I figure it can't hurt.

I used to think that stone tools were just stone tools, but the farther I get into the complexities of how this really works, the greater I appreciate how sophisticated the craftsmen of hundreds, thousands and tens of thousands of years ago were.

Another support is two fingers at the edge so the flake can run between them.

And, use the right weight billet. I've shifted too light and had bad results when thinning.

Finally, because I was just struggling with it. Work both sides evenly. Actually the order of removal is:

Flatten and thin

Thin the ends while you still have mass in the middle

Space out your platforms so the flakes leave ridges for the next run of plakes.

Keep a wavy edge until your are ready to finish up.

Keep even balanced convexity on both sides of the lenticular cross section.

There, now it'll be a piece of cake!



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Thanks Hixton! That was really helpful; I have a fairly good idea of support when it comes to material such as chert and obsidian, but I have only recently even started to get to know support with quartzite and other non - elastic rocks. Keith Copi (Hummingbird Point) recently gave me one of his points out of quartzite, and I must say that it is, after experiencing so much failure with just thinning and snapping the piece, beyond extraordinary (it is posted below). Also Willjo, that is an amazing point, superb job done.

Frank

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I wonder what your source of quartzite is? It by as a nice color to it but looks pretty coarse. The stuff I have used varies from pretty dense and glassy, high quality, to fairly soft and grainy. But your stuff looks hard n grainy. So tough to work with.
Is it from Wyoming, m
Like the Spanish diggings type?

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hixton
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April 17th, 2018, 3:23 am #686

hixton wrote:
VirginiaKnapper wrote:
hixton wrote:Yes, freeze talks about that. I started thinking about support more seriously about a year ago. Although I was supporting my work before that, I realized that, as I learned, that if I don't support the piece well, the flakes won't run where I want them to. Quartzite is a somewhat softer material so getting a good solid platform is important. Putting a finger tip just back off the edge under the platform protects from putting too much bending force on the thin section of the piece. Avoid too much downward energy on the lip, also makes s big difference. I've become more aware of the opportunity that comes with directing the force into the width of the piece while lightly supporting the edge at the platform.

I may be repeating what you already know, but its taken me a long time to gradually see what's really going on, so I figure it can't hurt.

I used to think that stone tools were just stone tools, but the farther I get into the complexities of how this really works, the greater I appreciate how sophisticated the craftsmen of hundreds, thousands and tens of thousands of years ago were.

Another support is two fingers at the edge so the flake can run between them.

And, use the right weight billet. I've shifted too light and had bad results when thinning.

Finally, because I was just struggling with it. Work both sides evenly. Actually the order of removal is:

Flatten and thin

Thin the ends while you still have mass in the middle

Space out your platforms so the flakes leave ridges for the next run of plakes.

Keep a wavy edge until your are ready to finish up.

Keep even balanced convexity on both sides of the lenticular cross section.

There, now it'll be a piece of cake!



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Thanks Hixton! That was really helpful; I have a fairly good idea of support when it comes to material such as chert and obsidian, but I have only recently even started to get to know support with quartzite and other non - elastic rocks. Keith Copi (Hummingbird Point) recently gave me one of his points out of quartzite, and I must say that it is, after experiencing so much failure with just thinning and snapping the piece, beyond extraordinary (it is posted below). Also Willjo, that is an amazing point, superb job done.

Frank

Sent from my SCH-I545 using Tapatalk
I wonder what your source of quartzite is? It by as a nice color to it but looks pretty coarse. The stuff I have used varies from pretty dense and glassy, high quality, to fairly soft and grainy. But your stuff looks hard n grainy. So tough to work with.
Is it from Wyoming, m
Like the Spanish diggings type?

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I missed that the point you posted is not one you know made. Do you ha e picture of the material you're using?

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Troy Harkey
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Joined: February 10th, 2009, 9:48 pm

April 17th, 2018, 4:45 am #687

hixton wrote:
hixton wrote:
VirginiaKnapper wrote:Thanks Hixton! That was really helpful; I have a fairly good idea of support when it comes to material such as chert and obsidian, but I have only recently even started to get to know support with quartzite and other non - elastic rocks. Keith Copi (Hummingbird Point) recently gave me one of his points out of quartzite, and I must say that it is, after experiencing so much failure with just thinning and snapping the piece, beyond extraordinary (it is posted below). Also Willjo, that is an amazing point, superb job done.

Frank

Sent from my SCH-I545 using Tapatalk
I wonder what your source of quartzite is? It by as a nice color to it but looks pretty coarse. The stuff I have used varies from pretty dense and glassy, high quality, to fairly soft and grainy. But your stuff looks hard n grainy. So tough to work with.
Is it from Wyoming, m
Like the Spanish diggings type?

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I missed that the point you posted is not one you know made. Do you ha e picture of the material you're using?

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Made this baby Clovis-ish point tonight. Not sure of the rock type. I found it in the creek while looking for rocks. It was kind of like crystal and didn’t flake well. I threw it in the cooker when I cooked some other rocks. After that it reacted ok to percussion and would pressure flake somewhat. I was able to get a little flute down one side. Was good practice.


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VirginiaKnapper
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April 17th, 2018, 10:54 am #688

hixton wrote:
VirginiaKnapper wrote:
hixton wrote:Yes, freeze talks about that. I started thinking about support more seriously about a year ago. Although I was supporting my work before that, I realized that, as I learned, that if I don't support the piece well, the flakes won't run where I want them to. Quartzite is a somewhat softer material so getting a good solid platform is important. Putting a finger tip just back off the edge under the platform protects from putting too much bending force on the thin section of the piece. Avoid too much downward energy on the lip, also makes s big difference. I've become more aware of the opportunity that comes with directing the force into the width of the piece while lightly supporting the edge at the platform.

I may be repeating what you already know, but its taken me a long time to gradually see what's really going on, so I figure it can't hurt.

I used to think that stone tools were just stone tools, but the farther I get into the complexities of how this really works, the greater I appreciate how sophisticated the craftsmen of hundreds, thousands and tens of thousands of years ago were.

Another support is two fingers at the edge so the flake can run between them.

And, use the right weight billet. I've shifted too light and had bad results when thinning.

Finally, because I was just struggling with it. Work both sides evenly. Actually the order of removal is:

Flatten and thin

Thin the ends while you still have mass in the middle

Space out your platforms so the flakes leave ridges for the next run of plakes.

Keep a wavy edge until your are ready to finish up.

Keep even balanced convexity on both sides of the lenticular cross section.

There, now it'll be a piece of cake!



Sent from my SM-G960U using Tapatalk
Thanks Hixton! That was really helpful; I have a fairly good idea of support when it comes to material such as chert and obsidian, but I have only recently even started to get to know support with quartzite and other non - elastic rocks. Keith Copi (Hummingbird Point) recently gave me one of his points out of quartzite, and I must say that it is, after experiencing so much failure with just thinning and snapping the piece, beyond extraordinary (it is posted below). Also Willjo, that is an amazing point, superb job done.

Frank

Sent from my SCH-I545 using Tapatalk
I wonder what your source of quartzite is? It by as a nice color to it but looks pretty coarse. The stuff I have used varies from pretty dense and glassy, high quality, to fairly soft and grainy. But your stuff looks hard n grainy. So tough to work with.
Is it from Wyoming, m
Like the Spanish diggings type?

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No, problably from around here. Copi gave me it, so I will have to ask him, but it is very likely that it is from here. I would, however, love to get my hands on some from Wyomings, such as Spanish Diggings, or other fine grained stuff.

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VirginiaKnapper
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April 19th, 2018, 1:02 am #689

I made this a couple days ago our of some local quartz. I used much percussion with a boxwood billet, with a little help from the hammerstone, and finished it with it some horizontal indirect percussion (boxwood also). Also finished this Guilford axe out of Greenstone, using both hammerstone and wood billet. It is disturbingly hard, and there are finer varieties here, I have been told that this stuff is mainly for peck and grind.

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hixton
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April 19th, 2018, 8:08 pm #690

VirginiaKnapper wrote:I made this a couple days ago our of some local quartz. I used much percussion with a boxwood billet, with a little help from the hammerstone, and finished it with it some horizontal indirect percussion (boxwood also). Also finished this Guilford axe out of Greenstone, using both hammerstone and wood billet. It is disturbingly hard, and there are finer varieties here, I have been told that this stuff is mainly for peck and grind.

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Yes, those look like challenging materials. I have tried Quartz and it can be ok if you get a good piece. It is impressive when you can make a nice sparkly point out of it.

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swataramike
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April 20th, 2018, 2:01 am #691

pine tree..pedernales flake...natural tools 
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Troy Harkey
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Yesterday, 2:26 pm #692

Made this last night, didn’t start out to be nearly as small but I blew the ears off when notching. Not sure if I was too close to the edge or what. Anyway I salvaged this from it. Made from buffalo river.


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ShootinFlakes6245
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Yesterday, 2:33 pm #693

I dont have any rock pics to post but just thought I'd share...
Disney World bound, Orlando Florida

You all work some rocks for me!

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Thanks for your time,
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hixton
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Yesterday, 2:44 pm #694

Troy Harkey wrote:Made this last night, didn’t start out to be nearly as small but I blew the ears off when notching. Not sure if I was too close to the edge or what. Anyway I salvaged this from it. Made from buffalo river.


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I too have lost ears when notching! Nice little point. Beautiful material! I also have a solid track record of making potentially nice large points into actual nice small points. I contend that in time it will make me a better knapper.

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boletus
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Yesterday, 4:45 pm #695

That is some killer looking material
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KnappingBull
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Yesterday, 6:27 pm #696

Finally out of the snow and -40 weather. Got a nice point done out of some georgetown, I didn't spend enough time preparing for flaking though, so its a bit rough on that front. Happy with it either way. Saved a pic of the percussion work beforehand too.
cBBK1ex.jpg
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PaleoSoul
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Yesterday, 6:38 pm #697

9.5" Three sided Dacite dagger

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Stacyharmon
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Joined: December 24th, 2017, 11:43 am

Yesterday, 6:42 pm #698

KnappingBull wrote: Finally out of the snow and -40 weather. Got a nice point done out of some georgetown, I didn't spend enough time preparing for flaking though, so its a bit rough on that front. Happy with it either way. Saved a pic of the percussion work beforehand too.
Looks nice, I'd be happy with it also. Iv not worked much Georgetown but like what I have. I just wished it looked like the flintridge Roy digs!
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hixton
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Today, 2:03 am #699

KnappingBull wrote:Finally out of the snow and -40 weather. Got a nice point done out of some georgetown, I didn't spend enough time preparing for flaking though, so its a bit rough on that front. Happy with it either way. Saved a pic of the percussion work beforehand too.
That looks familiar. I like the George town a lot, it's nice, uniform n predictable. Nice hammer flake scars.

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