Tuning a bow/arrows for proper flight. Original thread title: "Tuning...HELP!!"

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Tuning a bow/arrows for proper flight. Original thread title: "Tuning...HELP!!"

poekoelan
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poekoelan
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Joined: May 24th, 2005, 5:20 am

January 1st, 2007, 12:20 am #1

I usually don't have too many problems getting good arrow flight but one bow is giving me FITS!!
It's got two fairly big knots, one in each limb. It's the noisiest bow I've made. I don't notice much handshock, but I use a very loose grip to begin with. I suppose the knots contribute to the noise, and string silencers may help ...but....

No matter what arrow spines I try, I'm getting crappy flight. The weaker ones that I normally use in most of my bows are practically hitting the target sideways. The stiffer ones sound like they are smacking the side of the bow, making the bow sound even louder than it is.

I've played with the nocking point and I've played with the brace hieght a little, but never went too high because I prefer to keep it as low as possible on self bows.

I thinks it's the prettiest bow I've made, but I can't get it to shoot for crap. Any suggestions would be appreciated.
Austin goodbye. hello
Last edited by poekoelan on December 28th, 2007, 2:49 am, edited 1 time in total.
goodbye. hello
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toxophileken
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toxophileken
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Joined: January 15th, 2006, 4:55 am

January 1st, 2007, 1:48 am #2

Austin, you have probably already tried shooting upside down (the bow, not you)...

And you know that you can affect arrow spine by using different weight points...

You can also change the effective spine by using a lighter or heavier string...

Have you tried placing the arrow pass in other places, and moving your bow hand? Sam had me do that yesterday with a bow I just made that I thought was shocky, and it became smooth as glass when I put the arrow at the center of the bow, moving my hand down a bit...

Good luck.

Ken
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Guest
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January 1st, 2007, 1:56 am #3

Check your bow's string alignment Austin. How's it tracking down the bow?-ART B
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mewolf1
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mewolf1
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Joined: January 2nd, 2007, 12:52 pm

January 2nd, 2007, 6:44 am #4

What's your draw weight?
What's the spine weight of the arrows?
Sounds to me like the spine weights are off. One method that I have used is to shoot bear shafts til they fly right, then fletch.
As said above, different weighted points can make a huge difference too.
Good judgment comes from experience, and a lot of that comes from bad judgment.
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poekoelan
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poekoelan
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Joined: May 24th, 2005, 5:20 am

January 2nd, 2007, 7:51 am #5

draw weight is 55lbs. I'm pretty sure I shot it from both side when I made it, I usually do that with all my bows unless for some reason I decided on top and bottom beforehand. I'm going to remove the handle wrap and shoot it from both sides again and see what happens. I'll also try gripping it a little lower, but I don't have much room for that as it only has a 4" grip and I've got pretty big hands.

The string runs down the center of the handle. I've tried arrow spines from 40 to about 90. It doesn't seem to like any of them. It seems like anything lower than 55 flies horribly and anything over that smacks the side.

Another thing I may try is building out the arrow a pass a bit. Gonna play around with it tomorrow and see what happens. goodbye. hello
goodbye. hello
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sagitarius boemorum
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Joined: May 26th, 2005, 6:53 pm

January 2nd, 2007, 8:30 am #6

1) How does the crossection of bow at the arrowpass look like?
2) how long are the arrows in relation to your drawlenght?


It is good to have arrow touching still the same point on the bow profile at brace height and fulldraw.
Also its good to have fron oscilation knot of arrow exactly at arrowpass when at fulldraw.


Jaro
32 down on the Robert McKenzie
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Guest
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January 2nd, 2007, 11:26 am #7

Ive had problem bows that no matter what I did with the bow itself I got bad arrow flight . Some times its not the bows tiller or brace height or nocking point . In my experience by simply shooting arrows approx 10 pound underspined for the draw weight with a Forward of centre a minimum of 20% and lots of height on the fletches , cut them to atleast 3/4 " in height . Length is less important than height4 1/2 "is a good minimum plus an arrow around 4" longer than your draw seems to smooth out flight . regards Perry
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gianluca100
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gianluca100
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Joined: June 10th, 2005, 3:04 pm

January 2nd, 2007, 11:52 am #8

hello,

i had similar problems not so long ago and it turned out that the brace height was too low. i did not dare to higher the brace on a really long longbow, because i am used to string my flatbows rather low. so, just try it for some shots with different spines; if it's not the problem then you can always lower it afterwards with no damage to the bow. i was astonished how much it did make (though i should have known, since i'm shooting for quite some years now!).
a bow is useless if it doesn't shoot straight. if you can make it work with a rather high brace, then just go for it, you will get used to the (apparentely) strange looks (i did too)...

good luck,
gian-luca
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poekoelan
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poekoelan
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Joined: May 24th, 2005, 5:20 am

January 4th, 2007, 6:44 pm #9

I shot it from the other side and most the problem disappeared. It even shot quieter. I immediately put it on the tillering board..

Guess what. the top limb had about a quarter inch positive tiller!!! Don't know when or how that happened, but the top limb is now the bottom limb and arrow flight is much improved.
goodbye. hello
goodbye. hello
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Rod
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Rod
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Joined: June 17th, 2005, 11:07 pm

January 17th, 2012, 1:11 pm #10

Sounds like the geometry is better that way round, less disruption in paradox when shooting. Too much and nothing will shoot well.

Rod.
It's meant to be simple, not easy.
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