Things don't fall up in the woods.

jwellsy
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jwellsy
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Joined: July 2nd, 2009, 10:23 pm

July 31st, 2009, 4:41 am #1

Ever wonder how an animal can jump so quickly at the sound of an arrow being shot that they can turn, duck, jump or dodge an arrow? I think that a lot of times we tip our hand prematurely with a swing draw. Things fall down and animals move horizontaly, nothing falls up in the woods. So when you swing your bow upward during the draw, that unnatural act can alert the game a second before the shot that something isn't right.

To avoid the unnatural movement of something falling up, my shooting style is a bit different. First off I try to keep my bow vertical at all times. If your bow is horizontal with the arrow pointing down, then there has to be an upward movement to get it into shooting position. I sew a bow holder pocket into the knee of my camo or hang it straight up/down. When I see a deer I'll slowly reposition the bow while it is not looking and start tracking the animal with the arm holding the bow fully extended. I keep the arrow pointed at the exact spot I intend to hit, but without keeping any draw tension. When it's time to take the shot, it's one small horizontal movement to reach my anchor point at the corner of my mouth and let it go without holding it.

The index finger on my bow hand does double duty. During large bow movements I use the index finger to keep the arrow on the shelf. Right before and during the shot I tend to point my finger at the exact spot I intend to hit. If I could see individual hairs I would pick out one specific hair to hit and point at it.

I tend to practice archery the way I shoot in the woods deer hunting. I practice shooting with the only movement being my drawing hand. Also, the last month or so before season starts my practice consists of shooting just one arrow with the same shaft and broadhead I'll hunt with. Whether it's a good shot or not, I shoot once and quit. I make that one shot count. You don't get do-overs in the woods, so why practice that way. Learn to make that one shot count.

This works for me and my instictive shooting style. Your job is to find what works for you.
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Rod
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Rod
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Joined: June 17th, 2005, 11:07 pm

May 24th, 2013, 10:46 am #2

It may be worth thinking about the difference between pointing the arrow and pointing the index finger of the bow hand.

Rod.
Last edited by Rod on October 29th, 2013, 10:50 am, edited 1 time in total.
It's meant to be simple, not easy.
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toxophileken
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toxophileken
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Joined: January 15th, 2006, 4:55 am

October 31st, 2013, 10:05 pm #3

Some very good thoughts, IMO.

When waiting ("on stand"), I keep my bow up and ready. The first thing I do if I hear or smell or see game is carefully get my bow arm in position. I agree that the only motion you want at the time of the shot is the drawing arm. Even then, it pays to wait for the game to be looking away or distracted.

A very timely post for hunting season.

Ken
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