Simple Turk's Head

Forager
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Forager
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Joined: October 22nd, 2010, 11:42 pm

July 30th, 2018, 12:17 am #1

My young nephew (8 years old) and I enjoy tying knots as deeply antiquated forms of solitaire, and double-solitaire when we do them together.  One afternoon he glanced through one of my books and requested that I tie the knot of his choice, which I did in my length of our paracords -
Simple Turk's Head.JPG
The overhand knot at the top is so that it fits over the drawer knob of a spice rack in our home.  Looks cool and reminds me of a shared experience.
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Chippintuff
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Chippintuff
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Joined: January 21st, 2011, 12:25 am

July 30th, 2018, 1:02 am #2

I would not know where to start. Is part of the puzzle a matter of starting from one end? Is part of it doing it from memory, or do you use a picture for reference?

WA
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Forager
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Joined: October 22nd, 2010, 11:42 pm

July 30th, 2018, 1:27 am #3

Yeah that's how I felt once my curiosity about knots got the better of me.  I do feel that knots appeal to me in that they pose a visual puzzle which can be a pleasure to pursue... in some cases an end in themselves and in others a useful tool helping to resolve a puzzle within an unrelated task.  

It is marvelous that we've come to bind and loose solutions to so many technical details using knots and have likewise come up with beautiful patterns in doing so.  Who can tell how very far back this tradition carries into the past?  The fact of our ability in making cordage itself implies a very distant antiquity.

There are some good books and guides, this one taken from John Shaw's excellent The Directory of Knots   A Step-by-Step Guide to Tying Knots:

Simple Turk's Head Knot.JPG
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VirginiaKnapper
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VirginiaKnapper
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Joined: March 13th, 2018, 4:32 pm

July 30th, 2018, 1:50 am #4

I have been attemting new knots lately. I've been practicing, well, to practice, but now it's a matter of using them in the field.

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"It's about what you learn, not what you make" - Erret Callahan
"Win some, lose some, and sometimes ran out" - Kenny Roberts
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