should I scrape new saplings

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should I scrape new saplings

okema
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okema
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Joined: 17 Mar 2006, 02:58

11 Feb 2008, 19:15 #1

Hey youall I'm wondering if I should scrape these maple sapling I just gathered for arrows or should I let them dry with the bark on?
Also is there any thing else I should do while waiting for them to dry. Maybe to help them dry strait.

Okema
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Hillbilly NC
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Hillbilly NC
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Joined: 26 May 2005, 03:34

11 Feb 2008, 23:28 #2

Designate one as a sacrificial laboratory shaft and scrape the bark off. Some shoots can be peeled immediately, and some will check if you do. Sealing the ends of peeled ones with glue will help. After they've dried a few days, you can hand-straighten them every day or two as they're seasoning, really helps them dry straight.
Save the Cro-Magnons
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okema
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okema
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Joined: 17 Mar 2006, 02:58

12 Feb 2008, 16:18 #3

Thanks Hillbilly


Okema
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toxophileken
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toxophileken
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Joined: 15 Jan 2006, 04:55

12 Feb 2008, 18:29 #4

What I did with plum (which checks very very easily) is to scrape off the bark right away (if you don't, it becomes very difficult to scrape off when dry). Then I hand straightened each shaft, and placed them in a high humidity environment (my bathroom where I shower). Every day for about a week or longer, I would hand straighten them. Then I brought them out into a more normal humidity environment, and let them continue to dry - still hand straightening each shaft every day. Within about 2-3 weeks, they were all pretty straight (only very little heat straightening needed, on just a few shafts), and mostly dry. Another couple weeks, and they are completely dry, as far as I can tell.

Ken
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howweird
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howweird
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Joined: 13 Apr 2006, 07:32

13 Feb 2008, 19:00 #5

with maple i leave the bark on them , Maple will check bad if dryed to fast .
If it was dog wood I take the bark off .
Howard
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fiddler49
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fiddler49
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Joined: 04 Apr 2006, 16:39

14 Feb 2008, 19:59 #6

If you run your shafts slowly back and forth over stove or fire within an hour after bark is removed
they will almost never check. About 10 minutes of preliminairy drying and a second drying and straightening and you can shoot the arrow usually within a day. I've used this method many times
on the juiciest green shoots with great results. The advantages are that the bark is much easier to remove
green, plus straightening is easier with a small amount of moisture left in the shaft versus a bone dry shaft. cheers fiddler49
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howweird
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howweird
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Joined: 13 Apr 2006, 07:32

15 Feb 2008, 19:39 #7

Fddler ,
That works if you dont have a wife who has a
problem with the smell in the kitchen LOL !
I am lucky as I dont have that problem ,
But with my back doing it my way works well but
we each will find what works for us
in our own time .
But what a fgreat place to get a start as on PP !
Howard
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George Tsoukalas
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George Tsoukalas
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Joined: 24 May 2005, 03:38

16 Sep 2008, 14:56 #8

Leave the bark on. 2 min with a jack knife used as a scraper will make short work of the bark. Jawge
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RunningTwoWolves
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RunningTwoWolves
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Joined: 08 May 2008, 21:22

17 Oct 2009, 16:12 #9

I have found that when collecting maple saplings it is best to get them in the fall or winter months when the saplings are dormant and not producing sap. And if you don't know how thick the shafts should be use the thickness of the tip of your pinky finger to determine how thick they should be. Then take them and shave the bark off them and rub some Crisco over them and straiten them over a stove burner or a hot fire when its just ashes and hot Coles. Another way you can do it is take about 20 of them and tie them together with some string then wrap them with a deer hide and tie them to a wooden tripod and smoke them in a smoke house or over a fire but use soft rotten wood to smoke them.
Last edited by RunningTwoWolves on 17 Oct 2009, 16:18, edited 1 time in total.
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