A forum containing tutorials pertaining to bowmaking tools - their use, maintenance, etc.
bookworm
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bookworm
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Joined: December 30th, 2005, 4:16 am

September 21st, 2006, 6:26 pm #21

Looks very familiar! Do you think you could add something like this to lock everything down?



Or perhaps you could just use a wedge?

Doug
"I was glad I could answer promptly, and I did. I said I didn't know." - Mark Twain, from Life on the Mississippi.
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Joined: April 1st, 2006, 10:11 pm

September 21st, 2006, 7:25 pm #22

Oh, yeeeaaaahhhhhh . . . . . I see what you're saying.

I don't see any reason that couldn't work. But I'm not sure it's necessary. I gather that you want to be able to keep both feet on the ground. But I think you can do that just by hanging a weight from the end of the arm (lever), if you get the geometry right. That'd be easier to work with, too: You wouldn't have to mess around with unlocking the arm every time you wanted to move the work piece.

If I can find the time, I'm going to try to build one of these this weekend. (My former favorite work surface for bows has been converted into a stand for my charcoal forge, so I need a replacement anyway.) If I do, I'll try it first without the locking mechanism. If that doesn't provide a positive enough grip, I'll see about adding one.-Matt
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bookworm
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bookworm
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September 21st, 2006, 7:39 pm #23

Good luck, Matt. Let us know how things turn out.

Doug
"I was glad I could answer promptly, and I did. I said I didn't know." - Mark Twain, from Life on the Mississippi.
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greenchicken
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September 21st, 2006, 9:02 pm #24

BOOK WORM!!!!! That was the missing factor, a locking post.

Take my jaw mechanism.
Install it with Dad One's orientation and lever action.
Add Book Worms locking system.

And you have the perfect system (i think).

Yes Dad One, a good weight eliminates the need for a lock, but a good lock eliminates the need to shlep around a weight.

The key now is to design the lock that it easy to engage and release while still being firm.

I will work on this tonight.
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PaleoAleo
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September 21st, 2006, 10:04 pm #25

See, 3 heads are better than one!

Can't wait to see the new photos/drawings (I'm at work and can't see the photos - my employer blocks most of the photo hosts).

Tom
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Joined: April 1st, 2006, 10:11 pm

September 21st, 2006, 11:27 pm #26

GC,

"A good lock eliminates the need to shlep around a weight." Yeah, but I don't mind shlepping around a bucket -- as long as I don't have to fill it with water until I get where I'm going.

But I do think you may be onto something.-Matt
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greenchicken
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Joined: June 22nd, 2005, 5:13 am

September 22nd, 2006, 12:29 am #27

Dad One,

i also see the lock and a added pressure point. Something BOW LIKE that bends into the locked position added pressure.

But the one-gallon jug filled with water definitely works too. But I can say the only water source at Pasadena is a water fountain whose trickle would take probably 15 minutes to fill a jug.
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bookworm
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bookworm
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September 22nd, 2006, 1:46 am #28

Can't wait to see how this comes out. Talk about Frankenstein's monster !

Tom. Three heads might be better than one, but there has got to be joke in there somewhere. How many bowyers does it take to make a shaving pony/bow vice...?

Hmmmmm.....


Doug
"I was glad I could answer promptly, and I did. I said I didn't know." - Mark Twain, from Life on the Mississippi.
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Joined: April 1st, 2006, 10:11 pm

September 22nd, 2006, 4:25 am #29

Yeah, if you set it up right you could definitely use the lock to add some pressure. Can't wait to see what you come up with!-Matt
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greenchicken
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Joined: June 22nd, 2005, 5:13 am

September 22nd, 2006, 4:58 am #30

OK, I was wrong about the power of the foot. I begin to think that this design has been around for hundred of years, why would that be if using the foot pressure was unstable.



Floppy the jaw as Dad One suggested combine with only a modest amount of foot pressure held a stave very securely and I found it quite comfortable. I will still enjoy tweaking the design but if it get too complex it will, much like my horn bow project, never get done.

The biggest question now is do I build it from all my 2x4, 2x10 scraps or do I get some nice redwood decking material?

Also, do I make the legs rigid or removable?
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toxophileken
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Joined: January 15th, 2006, 4:55 am

September 22nd, 2006, 5:24 am #31

Redwood is lighter if you want to make it portable... but a little more expensive. Haven't regretted the money I spent on my benches.

The foldable metal sawhorse legs on mine work pretty good, but aren't so pretty. $20 for two sawhorses (four legs) is a pretty good deal. I can cut them if you need me too...

Phil, are you going to the Malibu shoot this weekend? I am thinking about making the trek...

Ken
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greenchicken
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September 22nd, 2006, 5:57 am #32

It was only your comment Ken that made me realize how much lighter Redwood is over fir. But I can;t do the metal legs. They make the most sense, but I might as well mount a Harbor Freight vise if I use them.

I won't make this month shoot. It is Rosh Hanashana, the Jewish New Year, so I will be temple.

Beside I am down to only three arrows. I have been in search of shafts for 2 months. I refuse to pay $2 to $3 per shaft and my local Home Depot has the worst dowels. I need 5/16 spined for 40-45, very hard to find locally.

But I am planning on going to the Halloween shoot next month. And the Toy for Tots at Simi
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toxophileken
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September 22nd, 2006, 6:55 am #33

Try Ace Hardware, or H&E. They have the best shafts, of all the places I have checked across the state...

Walmart has dowels, too... back in crafts. Also, Joannes Sewing Center (something like that) and sewing shops have some... I have score at such places before.

You can get cheap wood shafts from F/S arrows... Maybe not the greatest quality... but cheap...

Oh... and you could use the hardware from the folding sawhorses... and bolt on some wood.... Same function...

Happy Jewish New Year!

Ken
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Joined: April 1st, 2006, 10:11 pm

September 22nd, 2006, 1:18 pm #34

NOW THAT'S WHAT I'M TALKIN' ABOUT!!

-Matt
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greenchicken
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Joined: June 22nd, 2005, 5:13 am

September 22nd, 2006, 4:25 pm #35

Quick Opinions:

Will moving from 2x10 construction lumber to redwood decking material make the horse so light that it will no longer be a stable? I hope to get what I need on the way home from work today so I can start building tomorrow morning.

I got bows to make, gotta get this bench done!
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Salvador6
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Joined: July 31st, 2005, 1:15 pm

September 22nd, 2006, 6:19 pm #36

Phil I think I've mentioned this before, for that draw weight 40-45, your best bet is the poplar from Lowe's and OSH. It makes some really nice shafting, better than ramin. If you keep looking at the chinese poplar that Home depot carries I understand your disappointment, but the good American poplar is first class. I consider poplar to be a first class arrow wood, and in dowel form its good too. I may have to do a "poplar intervention" with you like I did with Greenchile and Yakuza.

I look forward to the new and improved shaving pony.
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PaleoAleo
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September 22nd, 2006, 6:31 pm #37

Phil, I think you'd be better off with heavier lumber for your vice.

T
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greenchicken
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September 22nd, 2006, 7:35 pm #38

Sal, YEP you've told me. My local OSH sucks more than HD, and I got no Lowels near me. There is one off the 118 about 30 minutes away and I plan to go there on SUnday.
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tom sawyer
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September 22nd, 2006, 8:30 pm #39

You all have some interesting ideas on ways to hold down a big ol' split of wood. Its always been my observation, that one of the most difficutl things aobut bowyering is figuring out how to hold the stupid piece still so you can work it. And I've yet to figure out a good way to hog the bark and sapwood off a big split of wood. So I just stick it in my vise as best I can, and ride the stupid thing while I work it.

In fact, I like billets much better simply for the fact that their shorter length makes them much easier to handle/work. Its certainly not because I'm adept at cutting splices.
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Salvador6
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Joined: July 31st, 2005, 1:15 pm

September 23rd, 2006, 10:14 pm #40

Lennie, the best "vise" for debarking for me is a treefork. I always work better standing up. The big bowbench that Tim Flood donated at Mojam is very good for an odd shaped piece of wood, its not small though.
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