Serving Help

greenchicken
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greenchicken
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Joined: June 22nd, 2005, 5:13 am

September 25th, 2005, 6:39 pm #1

I know most of your paleo archers do not serve your bow strings. I liek the look of a served string and got myself a strign serving tool.

I just served my first string. Pretty straight foward job until the end. I did a simple knot what I hope will hold.

I am sure there is a basic proceedure.

Can anyone advise me.
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Marc St Louis
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Marc St Louis
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September 25th, 2005, 7:15 pm #2

When you come to the end leave about 10" of serving and cut it off. Next make a loop and take the end and wind it around the string by going through the loop about 10 times, you need to wind it in the direction you were serving. Then lay the leftover end over the serving that you have already done. Now take the serving thread where you left off and keep winding it by going over the end. Once you're done you just pull on the end and it's done. Understand?Marc
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Grey Taylor
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September 25th, 2005, 7:22 pm #3

Yup, do what Marc said
It's something very easy to show, but not so easy to write. Here's a link to the best tutorial I've found: How to Serve a Bowstring

Making a Flemish string is the start of the knowledge, learning the Brotherhood's way to tie off the serving is another level. When I show people how to do this I tell them that they are now far enough along the path to begin to guide others and I get a promise that they do just that.

Knowledge, like peanuts, is meant to be shared.

The Grey Confuscious
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George Tsoukalas
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September 25th, 2005, 7:27 pm #4

Nice descriptions. Let me add. I serve ottoms up for me winding in the same direction the string rolls off my fingers which is the same direction the flemishstring was twisted. Before I start the serving I push the end through the the string and then I begin winding around 1/2 inch of the tip. Makes a nice secure start. The whip knot is tough to describe. When I get to the top I give it two 1/2 hitches just to hold it in place. Then I stretch the serving out, wind the spool inside 10 times around the string and then back around 10 times and pull it through. LOL. I don't understand myself either. Jawgehttp://mysite.verizon.net/georgeandjoni
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roguearcher
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September 26th, 2005, 12:14 am #5

great pics and description in TBB I

jeff
Jeff Barwick
478-290-7244
www.onthegroundoutdoors.blogspot.com
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Rod
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Rod
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September 26th, 2005, 10:56 am #6

It is a good idea to serve in the same direction as the twist in the string, which should also be the direction that tightens the string as it rolls slightly when drawn back.
Also when you have finished the serving and trimmed off the tail of thread, seal both ends of the serving with a smear of superglue or clear nail varnish.
When you decide how far to serve, do not finish the top end too close to where you place your top finger on the string. If the serving finishes too close to your finger position, it is more likely to loosen up and separate under the pressure of being drawn and shot.
I like to leave at least two fingers width of serving above the top finger position if using the Mediterranean loose.
The easy way to visualise the finish of the serving is that you take the tail of thread a handspan away from the serving in a loose loop and continue taking the tail around the string in the same direction, but coming back towards the serving inside the slack loop that you have made.
You can do this whilst holding the top of the serving in a pinch with one hand, then hold the tail down with your thumb while you work back pulling the tail of serving tight, starting next to the serving and working back towards the top.
When you get to pulling the loop through, hook your tip of your little finger through the loop to stop it twisting into a knot as the loop comes tight as it is pulled through.
Let the loop slip off the tip of your finger at the last instant as you pull it tight through.
Rod.
It's meant to be simple, not easy.
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Doc
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Doc
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Joined: December 30th, 2004, 1:59 pm

November 11th, 2005, 6:58 am #7

Hi all;

I don't usually like to make a public display of my ignorance, but -
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It is a good idea to serve in the same direction as the twist in the string, which should also be the direction that tightens the string as it rolls slightly when drawn back.
This is a point, I have never understood. If the string rolls slightly, does it not tighten/loosen above the serving and have the opposite effect below the serving?

Doc
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Rod
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November 11th, 2005, 3:49 pm #8

If you roll it one way it tightens, if you roll it the other way it loosens up. The traditional method is to have it tighten as it rolls slightly with the draw and returns on the loose.
Rod.
It's meant to be simple, not easy.
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Doc
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November 11th, 2005, 5:47 pm #9

Hi Rod;

Thanks for the reply, but I still don't get it. If you take a string, that has a twist in it, and it's anchored at both ends, and you twist it in the middle in a fashion that tightens the string above the middle (where you're twisting it), it will loosen below the middle.

I've just tried this with a piece of string, so it's not my imagination. So where am I going wrong, or am I just too thick to understand this?

Doc
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Rod
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November 11th, 2005, 6:15 pm #10

I don't know how you make your strings, but making a laid in Flemish loop "in the hand", when this string is on the bow, the direction of twist throughout the whole string, as viewed from the top looking down the length of the string, will be clockwise for a right handed archer.
This presumes that in making the string, you hold the plies in a pinch in your left hand and counter twisting each away from you, you lay each ply over towards yourself.
Obviously, when making the loop you first work outwards, then turning the string and matching the tails, work back inwards to secure the loop and run out the tails.
The hitch end is continued in the same direction after laying out, pulling tight and rematching the plies.
Then on the bow, drawing the string with your string hand on the right hand side of the string, any "roll" on the draw will also be clockwise, as seen from the top. This will tighten the string on the draw and release it on the loose.
Rod.
It's meant to be simple, not easy.
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Doc
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November 12th, 2005, 6:15 am #11

Hi Rod;

Thank you for your patience. I guess I'm not explaining myself well, so, "a picture is worth........."



My poor quality 'paint' diagram is as you mentioned, clockwise as viewed from the top, or in other words, 'Z' twist cordage. If this doesn't explain it enough, then just ignore this post. One day I'll figure this out.

Thanks for your efforts,

Doc
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Rod
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November 12th, 2005, 8:26 pm #12

I must have been having one of those "senior" moments that Matt was telling me about.
Sure the bottom end unwinds some, but it doesn't matter just so long as it does it the same every time.
My typical serving runs from just above the top finger to about a handspan below my bottom finger.
The string under the serving is contained and does not wind or unwind to a significant degree.
All the same, the serving runs with the twist and at the nock, which is above centre, and the string rolls into tension during the draw and comes back on release.
Rod.
It's meant to be simple, not easy.
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Doc
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November 13th, 2005, 5:45 am #13

Hey Rod;
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I must have been having one of those "senior" moments that Matt was telling me about.
Get used to it. Take it from experience, they are ever increasing!

A friend of mine, who is a long time archer and fletcher, used to tell me the same thing about the string tightening when being drawn because of the rotational force and I made the same case as I did here, and we never did resolve it.

So now I have it, the string, above the line of applied force (the draw) will tighten, and this is the portion that is being referred to, without consideration to the effect on the lower part. I'm glad to finally know that I'm not missing something.

Thanks for your efforts and your patience,

Cheers!

Doc
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Flyfsh
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November 13th, 2005, 6:09 am #14

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