Scythian bow replica

Read Only - storage of past discussions of the authentic replication of historical bows.
redhawk 53
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redhawk 53
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Joined: 14 Jun 2008, 16:07

23 Mar 2012, 09:07 #61

Hey Yann, for wooden Scythian bows go here: http://redhawk55.wordpres...xperiences-and-thoughts/

I had been involved in the subject for years.

Michael
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Adam Karpowicz
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Adam Karpowicz
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Joined: 26 Dec 2008, 14:25

23 Mar 2012, 11:02 #62

Thanks for your comments. The Scythians were not really a race or even a nation, but a confederation of nomadic tribes spread out over the continent. The hornbows originated there thanks to the favourable conditions such as the open space (shooting far), the lack of good wood, the use of the horse (short bow) and availability of horn and sinew.

The siyahs on the bow are actualy rigid. This particular batch of bows had the ends quite curved, but there were other bows with much less recurve, almost straight siyahs with small hooks. That means the recurved ends were not made to help with energy storage by "un-rolling" during the draw - the effect was not intended. You can see the bow bends in the inner limbs and in the grip.

Adam
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mordechai
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mordechai
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Joined: 23 Sep 2011, 08:12

23 Mar 2012, 17:54 #63

Scythians surely weren't a nation but their lineage had to belong somewhere. I refer to the genetic group R1a1 found in scythians burials. A group associated with many tribes and cultures of Indo-European descent.
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Rod
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Rod
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Joined: 17 Jun 2005, 23:07

27 Apr 2012, 17:40 #64

redhawk 53 wrote: Redhorse, I talked a lot about the drawweights of horsebows with very experienced horsearchers, no one would use a 115lbs bow on horseback. That´s fact. We discussed that topic in the ATARNET again and again. A recently finished discussion on the ATARNET concluded with about 70lbs for an average horse- warrior, some Manchu- elite soldiers had been able to use 100lbs- bows on horseback effectively and accurate. I know you´ll argue back, but I don´t discuss this drawweight- mania anymore.
A late entry, but I had to respond to the above.

What Redhawk should have said was "I talked a lot about draw-weights of horsebows with horse archers I consider to be experienced but who could not handle more than 70 lbs, The fact is that these people thought that 115 lb was too heavy for horseback use".

If he has read Selby's "Chinese Archery" and looked at the figures, he will know that the likely useful range for a horse bow in organised military "warbow"cultures is in the 70 lb to 120 lb ballpark.
Knowing archers who are competent both with horses and heavy draw-weight weights, all I can add is that whilst 70 lb might be considered heavy in some tribal contexts, in an organised military context 70 lb is a low end draw-weight, seated or otherwise. But potentially useful draw weight nonetheless against a man with a heavy bow who is sufficiently overbowed that he could not hit you first.

Fantastic job Adam. I wonder if it is thick in the limbs in a trade of off speed for stability.


Rod.
It's meant to be simple, not easy.
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Adam Karpowicz
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Adam Karpowicz
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Joined: 26 Dec 2008, 14:25

28 Apr 2012, 11:30 #65

Rod - I completely agree with every word you say. One may add, the present competitions and the rules for horseback archery favor light weight bows and the archers have no incentive to up the weight. There is plenty of that on the battlefield. As to the range of draw weights - the accurate reproduction of old bows is the only way to have a reasonable answer. Exact measurements and the the use of old methods of production are essential. British longbows are a good example.

It is tempting to see the old bows as marvels of engineering, perfectly suited to the local conditions of use. As I see it, the Scythian bow's narrow limbs and shape reflect the bowyers belief that a bow should look like and be made of horn. The potential efficiency was probably never seen. If one does not have a chrono and a grainscale, small improvements are impossible to detect. It is much more obvious to use a stronger bow instead.

Adam
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Vonegelut
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Vonegelut
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Joined: 05 Dec 2011, 09:08

01 May 2012, 11:54 #66

This bow always impressing me!! My congratulations Adam!! And thanks for you advices about Ibex horn preparations on ATARN!!
   I live in Almaty (Kazakhstan) and there is a little town Issyk where the Golden Scythian warrior was found in 60-th of 20century. There were four types of Scythian(Sakian ) tribes that lived in Central Asia - "Парадарайя", "Хаомаварга", "Тиграхауда(массагеты)" & "Парасугудам". Golden man was from the "Тиграхауда" (Tigrahauda) tribe their main feature is a "pointed helmet". But their jewelry treasures ("beast style") are the same as the findings in Ukraine, Russian Tuva & Western China. 
Unfrotunately I've never saw their bows in our museums (maybe russian archeologists took them in Soviet period?)

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Prairie Man
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Prairie Man
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Joined: 15 Mar 2004, 14:44

28 Jan 2015, 10:08 #67

Hi Adam - What has become of your Scythian Bow ? I never get tired of looking at the photos
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