Quivers

santaj
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santaj
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Joined: February 11th, 2011, 8:47 am

February 11th, 2011, 8:47 am #1

As I am trying to reconstruct full attire of the viking age archer (as close as possible) i am now in the middle of big problem- quiver. Is there any possible finds or illustrations about his period quivers? I know of the leather fragments from Hedeby and of Bayeux tapestry, but are some other information from this period?
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garyduncan8
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February 11th, 2011, 9:28 pm #2

I found a written description here:

http://www.vikingsonline....es/articles/archery.html

Note the pictures that show how quivers were hung here (This is from the Bayeux tapestry):

http://www.regia.org/warfare/SaxonArchery.htm

A little more info here:

http://www.vikingblood.ne...82142bf6671df4bed8cc62e6

Should get you started.

Gary
Last edited by garyduncan8 on February 11th, 2011, 9:36 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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CraigMBeckett
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February 16th, 2011, 2:27 am #3

MMM!

Not sure that the vikings would have used quivers, I don't believe any have been unearthed in archaeological digs etc, (could be wrong and would welcome any enlightenment), but of course the lack of finds means nothing .
The English/Saxons certainly did not during the 100 years war, which is some time after the period you are interested in but please remember the Saxons/Angles/Jutes all came from the same area of north Germany and Denmark as the Danish Vikings.
The Bayeux tapestry is of a later date that the viking era and it is thought that most of the Norman Archers were mercenaries from the Mediterranean area, so again not Viking

Craig
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garyduncan8
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February 16th, 2011, 3:07 am #4

The Normans were in fact Vikings that ended up in France at the end of the Viking raids:

http://normans.etrusia.co.uk/whowere.php

So, the Bayeux Tapestry does have meaning as far as the Vikings are concerned IMHO, since it was the Normans (Northmen/Vikings) that invaded Britain.

The Vikings have always been portrayed as a sword, spear and axe wielding peoples, especially as far as battles go. However, swords, axes, and spears are not really conducive to hunting and the procuring of food.

I realize that the tapestry came about after 1066, but, quivers are not really a fashion statement that change with every season and let's face it; there is only so many ways you can wear a quiver or make it.

Since the tapestry portrays many people wearing hip quivers, I suspect that many hip quivers were in use well before tapesty time.

I believe that a hip quiver would be a good choice to emulate what a hunting Viking would use.

I still recommend getting in touch with the groups that I cited in my previous post as they seemingly do everything to be totally correct in all that they do in their reenactments. I believe that they would be willing to shed historical light on Viking quivers.

Gary
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garyduncan8
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February 16th, 2011, 3:38 am #5

I located this replica quiver based on a burial find at Hedeby, a Viking location.

http://vikingeskibsmuseet...index.php?id=621&L=1

Here is the quiver, by Nimpsu in Devian Art.



Here are photos of the finds that the replica was based on as well as some other leather finds. It was stated that it was made from vegetable tanned leather.







This is a very nice arrow bag/hip quiver from a Viking find dating to 850 A.D.

Gary
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garyduncan8
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February 16th, 2011, 4:12 am #6

Here is a site that says that the Vikings used bow and arrow in their attack on Paris in 885 and 886; so, apparently they did use bow and arrow in warfare. Note the other many battles and cites where the Vikings use of bow and arrows. So, apparently they were not just hackers, slashers or throwers. I was unaware of the Viking aspect.

http://www.strongbowsaga.com/showwik.asp?WikID=38

Gary
Last edited by garyduncan8 on February 16th, 2011, 4:17 am, edited 1 time in total.
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CraigMBeckett
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February 18th, 2011, 3:12 am #7

Garyduncan8
The Normans were in fact Vikings that ended up in France at the end of the Viking raids:
So, the Bayeux Tapestry does have meaning as far as the Vikings are concerned IMHO, since it was the Normans (Northmen/Vikings) that invaded Britain.
Never suggested the Normans were not descended from viking blood, the operative words here being descended from they were not viking anymore than the English even those from the Danelaw were. If  you actually read what I said concerning their archers you will see I said that the majority of them were not Norman but were instead mercenaries so again as I said the Bayeux tapestry has little meaning concerning viking archers. I would also add that current theory believes that the majority of the population of Normandy are not of viking origin but are of the peoples that lived there prior to the viking invasion, so generally not viking.

WRT the tapestry, its date of manufacture is unknown, some speculation puts it at about 1070, but that is only speculation, the first written mention of it was not until 1476 and as most art seems to incorporate components contemporary to the time it was made I would hesitate to base assumptions on it especially as it is believed to have been embroidered by English not Norman nuns.

If you don't believe quivers change drastically over time I suggest you do a little more reading and see what occurred from 16C onwards in England.

However it seems from your post that quivers were used by the vikings at Hedeby, so by extension would probably have been used elsewhere. Thanks for the picture, I stand enlightened my assumption was wrong.

Craig.
Last edited by CraigMBeckett on February 18th, 2011, 3:19 am, edited 1 time in total.
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ErictheViking
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October 3rd, 2012, 9:47 pm #8

Garyduncan8 could you give me the sizes of the quiver in the photo . I d like to make similar . If it s really from Hedeby it would be fit with the period I perform , besides i have lots of arrows made and i have nothing to keep it in .....
Eric.
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JKoehorst
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October 12th, 2012, 11:51 am #9

Yes, viking quiver finds are pretty rare. You could look at time periods before the viking age and find a plausible option there.

For example: Among the Nydam finds (danmark, ~300AD) was a very nice wooden hip quiver. Outside was formed on a lathe en the inside chiseled out after the wood was split in 2. This type could still be in use in the viking age.
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Rod
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April 20th, 2013, 10:58 am #10

What is the difference between an arrow bag and a quiver?  :-)_

Rod.
It's meant to be simple, not easy.
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