Quillwork & Natural Dyes - Pic Heavy

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Quillwork & Natural Dyes - Pic Heavy

Michael Bootz
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Michael Bootz
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September 22nd, 2008, 2:08 pm #1

Since we recently discussed quillwork in Braintanners [url=http://][/url]Quillwrapped fringe on snakeskin covered rawhide thread, I thought I'd show the things I've done since I started using natural dyes.

This is the first piece I've done using quills dyed with natural dyes. The colors aren't perfect and the quality of the quillwork is not exactly A+ (I definitly have to practice single line quillwork), but hey, that was some time ago .


[url=http://][/url]

Another knife sheath:






Next one is a plains style quiver and bowcase that I started months ago... I finally gotta sit down and finish it, I'm such a lazy bum .








That's the BITH I made for Indoorscout:




And finally here's my latest piece, just finished it last weekend. I'm really happy with how the colors turned out, I might finally get the hang of it:






I don't have a lot of time right now, I'll post my dye recipes later...

Michael
Last edited by Michael Bootz on September 22nd, 2008, 2:10 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Quillsnkiko
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September 22nd, 2008, 2:34 pm #2

Very nice....... Quillwork. Aw come on now , ....... you know your really good.
The second picture of the knife sheath ..the one with the fringe..is that commercial leather..the color does not look like braintan.. nor the fringe... perhaps it is though????
" You can't stop the waves .... but, you can learn to surf."
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Kechuwa
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September 22nd, 2008, 2:58 pm #3

Wow.. Incredibly beautiful work Michael, thanks for posting the pictures.

I kinda get the feeling that one might eat off the floor at your house, after seeing these pictures! :-D They are incredibly inspiring. I ordered some nymo and forgot to order any beeswax along with it! sigh....thanks and thanks again for the pictures this morning. I look very forward to reading about your dyes.

Yep.. the leather sure doesn't look like ANY of mine! Doubt very much if I will ever let go of any braintanned skins to anyone ever again!
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Michael Bootz
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September 23rd, 2008, 6:17 am #4

Thanks for your nice comments.

No, the leather is not braintan. It's commercial leather that was tanned with fish oil. I'm not sure what you would call that in English... I guess it might be what CrazyCrow call "German Tanned Buckskin".
The leather for the two knife sheath and the PITH pouch was dyed with walnut hulls, hence the color.

I'd very much like to work with braintan but I'm not a tanner nor do I know any. I couldn't even get any hides for tanning (did I mention that Germany can be a real crap-country if you want to do primitive skills?)
It's a real shame, but so far I haven't even seen any braintan yet.
So if anyone has got some for trade...

By the way Kechuwa:
The pictures (except the one of the PITH pouch) were taken on my kitchen table, and I do eat off that

Dye recipes will follow.
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Coyotlviejo
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September 23rd, 2008, 1:41 pm #5

Beautiful! Thanks for sharing your quillwork. I've been interested in trying quillwork, so its inspiring to see what folks have made.

Dan
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Quillsnkiko
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September 23rd, 2008, 2:32 pm #6

Michael , one of my best friends down the road came from Germany...I thought she told me ..there was a huge amount of interest in Native American stuff in Germany..and there are functions in Germany ..that look like a Indain Encampment but the folks are all Germans. seems strange that no one there would be tanning...if there is that much interest.
If folks realized... just how easy it really is to tan with brains... ( in saying easy..I don't mean its not hard work ) but easy as far as far as being something most anyone can handle if they understand exactly what needs to be done to accomplish it. (scraping all the hair and hair root area off the hair side of the hide..all the flesh & membrane off the flesh side of the hide... getting brains into the hide ..brain penetration ...& manipulating the hide till dry by stretching and pulling and smoking the hide for color and too keep it soft.)
Wow ..that amazing that your quillwork is on that oil tanned stuff..I have 2 hides of it..which Ive had for years intending to make a dress out of it
.I can tell you real braintan is so much easier to work with.
Ketch..has "so many" hides shes tanned ..maybe you 2 can work up a trade. ( ??????? ) any more... I don't tan any more hides than I use myself.
" You can't stop the waves .... but, you can learn to surf."
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Michael Bootz
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September 24th, 2008, 11:46 am #7

I've finally got some time to post my dye recipes:
  • orange: madder root
Soak the madder root in cold warer for a couple of hours or over night. Then heat the dyebath and simmer for a while (do NOT boil madder). The color should be a purplish red. Add a lug of vinegar (you could also use citric acid, if you don't like the smell), the color should turn to a bright red. Add the quills and dye until they have attained the desired shade of orange.

  • red:
madder root:
Follow the above instructions for orange and leave the quills in the dyebath until they are red. Sometimes it can happen that the quills don't turn really red, but only a deep orange (might depend on the batch of madder?). If that happens, take the quills out, let them dry and then re-dye.


cochineal:
Grind the cochineal to a powder, add water and simmer or boil for a while (edit: I don't grind cochineal anymore - see below). Like with madder, the dyebath is a purplish red. Add vinegar until the dyebath turns to a bright red. Add the quills and dye until they have attained the desired shade of red. With cochineal it is possible to get darker shades of red than with madder.

  • yellow:
dock root:
Add water to the dock root and boil for a while. Then add vinegar until the dyebath turns yellow. Add a little alum and the quills, dye until they are yellow. The resulting yellow is what I've used for the quiver above.

dock root + madder root:
For a slightly warmer tone of yellow, one can "pimp" it up a bit with madder root. Follow the above instructions and once the yellow-dyeing is finished, add some madder root to the dyebath. Now stir regularly and check the color of the quills frequently. Madder dyes relatively quickly and you don't want the quills to turn orange! Once the quills attained the desired shade, take them out. The result is the yellow I've used for the little bag in the last two pictures.

Edit:
Rhubarb root can be used just like dock root and is what I use mostly nowadays. Add water to the rhubarb root and boil for a while. Skim off the froth that forms. Then add vinegar until the dye bath turns yellow. I found that the alum doesn't really make a difference, so I don't use it anymore (neither when dyeing with dock root nor when using rhubarb root).

  • blue: indigo
There are several ways to dye with indigo, here's what I do:
You will need a dye/color remover. I guess any brand will do but to make sure check the contents list on the box. It has to contian sodium carbonate and sodium dithionite (sometimes also called hydrosulfite). I just checked the RIT homepage, their color remover should do the trick.
Put some indigo in your pot, add water and gently heat it. Don't make it too hot and don't boil (it shouldn't be hotter than 60°C).
Add some of the color remover (I use about the same amount as indigo, maybe a little more. Generally, a little more does not hurt but too little is no good). Stir gently, but don't stir like crazy. You don't want to stir too much air (=oxygen) into the dyebath! The dyebath will now turn green. If it doesn't, then add more color remover.
There will be a pretty strong smell, so be sure to open a window. Now let it set. Leave it alone for at least half an hour.
Now you are ready to dye. Indigo dyes very quickly, but the time needed can vary somewhat so I recommend dyeing one or two test quills before adding the whole bunch.
Stir frequently to make sure the dyeing is even, as indigo dyes so quickly. Getting a certain shade of blue is a bit tricky, since the quills will turn green in the dyebath. They only turn blue after taking them out and leaving them exposed to air for a couple of minutes.
Lighter shades of blue usually only require a couple of minutes, a nice dark blue like the one I used for the fringed knife sheath takes about 10-15 minutes.
Do not leave the quills too long in the dyebath! The dyebath is alkaline and alkaline solutions destroy the quills! About half an hour is not problem but an hour or longer will definitely destroy the quills.
After the quills were taken out of the dyebath and turned blue, there is a lot of indigo powder on the outside of the quills. Putting them in a bowl of cold water and stirring aroung a bit will get rid of most of that.

Instead of the color remover one can also use yeast, glucose/dextrose and sodium carbonate. I haven't tried this yet but I will. This method is a bit more time intensive but there will be no bad smell as with the dithionite.
(And there also is the method that was used in medievil times: fermented urine. But I definitely don't want to try that.)

  • purple: cochineal
Follow the instructions above for red but don't add too much vinegar. Add only as much as is needed to turn the dyebath to a bright red. Once the quills have turned red, add some sodium carbonate until the dyebath has turned to a deep purple. The quills will now slowly turn purple. Stir often and, as with indigo, don't leave the quills in the alkaline dyebath too long. About half an hour should do.
Any lye can be used instead of sodium carbonate. I prefer sodium carbonate since it is mild and easy to dose.


  • green: dock root + indigo
Follow the above instructions for yellow (Edit: I'm also mostly using rhubarb root for this nowadays). Let the quills dry after dyeing, then overdye with indigo. Don't leave them too long in the indigo dybath, a couple of minutes is enough (I strongly recommend testing with one or two quills before adding the whole lot).
If you leave them in for too long, then the result will be a dark, blueish green.


  • black: dock root + indigo + madder root
This is done by dyeing the quills three times, using the instructions above and drying them each time before dyeing the next color.
First dye yellow, then blue, then red. When dyeing blue, make sure to go as dark as you can.
The result will be pitch black, as can be seen in the pictures of the quiver, the PTIH pouch and the small bag.



One word about cochineal:
The critters contain pitch which will float on the surface of the dyebath. Make sure to remove the pitch because if you don't, you'll get black spots on your quills and these will not wash off!
I haven't yet found a really good way to effectively remove all of the pitch, but I'm trying. I know how it can be done perfectly but that would require some lab equipment and I don't want to get that.
Edit:
The best way I've found so far to avoid the pitch issue is to NOT grind the cochineal bugs. I put the whole bugs in a little bag, most of the times I use a tea-filter that I tie up with some string. Put the bag with the cochineal in the dyeing pot with water and leave for a couple of hours or over night. Then heat to low or medium heat, but don't boil and leave the dyebath for a while. Remove the bag with the cochineal, then dye the quills.


Some things I'm still working on/experiementing with:

turquoise/aqua: osage orange + indigo
First dye yellow with osage sawdust, then overdye with indigo, don't leave in the indigo for too long or you will get green quills.

pink: cochineal
When dyeing with cochineal, the quills first turn pink, then red. I have to do some more experiments to get the pink nice and even.

purple: cochineal + indigo
Dyeing pink with cochineal and then overdying with indigo should yield a deeper/more blueish purple than with cochineal alone.


And finally some things that just don't work for me, but that some people claim to use:
  • walnut hulls for black/dark brown
I tried lots of things but I just can't make it work. All I ever get (after hours and hours of dyeing) is a light tan color.

  • osage orange sawdust for yellow
All I manage to get is a very pale yellow while some people apparently use it for a deep, rich yellow. I've yet to try overdyeing several times but right now I can't do anything but very pale yellow.

  • blueberries or blackberries for purple
Can't make that work. The quills don't accept any dye at all.

  • elderberries for black or purple
Same as with blue- and blackberries


  • larkspur flowers for blue
The quills don't accept any dye.
Last edited by Michael Bootz on February 8th, 2015, 8:53 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Quillsnkiko
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September 24th, 2008, 2:20 pm #8

While Ive never used natural dyes really yet..Michael. a couple of questions.... your quills are you washing them well first ?? and adding them to the dye bath damp..damp meaning soft from being already in some hot water?? Quills being a natural substance like ..fingernails kind of or hair....hard hair.... need to be grease free....and softened.You probably are doing that but I just wondered.
I find black is the hardest thing to dye with the dyes I use..and I use rit and several others.I found by the addition of India ink..to the black dye bath it took better faster. however true Black continues to constrinate me some times.I am going to try some natural stuff added to that or insted of regular commercial dye for that.I also have some trap dye.... forget the name of it right off..I am going to try..oh yea ...log wood crystals
for dyeing traps .
I have a old book about Navaho dyeing of wool.... and another book .....Medicinal and Other Uses of North American Plants...by Charlotte Erichsen-Brown

that has a lot of stuff in it about how different tribes used different things ( plants etc. ) for dyes . sumac was a plant that was added to a lot of dye bath mixtures..either the shaved wood..or pith or leaves or berries.Its acid..also has a lot of tannin.might help with penetration??? just a thought. as a matter of a fact it was used by the indians so much for different things it was a trade item amongst many of them. so this book says. Quills
" You can't stop the waves .... but, you can learn to surf."
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Michael Bootz
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September 24th, 2008, 3:02 pm #9

Hi Quills,

yes, I do wash the quills and I soak them before dyeing.
I haven't tried sumac yet (it doesn't grow here in the wild but some folks have it in their gardens), but I've read that acid is supposed to facilitate dye penetration.
There are some dyes like madder where acid changes the color of the dye and thus the chemical structure. A neutral or alkaline solution of madder will not dye quills, but an acidic one will. I guess the acid (protonation) makes the dye molecule more polar and therefore it binds to the quills.
I've tried adding acid in cases where I get bad or no results (osage, walnut, berries), but it didn't help.
Since you can read in so many places that people use things like osage orange or walnut hulls to obtain really nice colors (I've even seen some photographs in an article once with a deep osage-yellow and a nice dark walnut-brown), I still think that I might do something wrong, but I wouldn't know what. Well, doesn't matter all that much since I get nice colors with lots of other stuff

I'm quite happy with my black. I thought that with the overdyeing thing I would get a dark brown at best and so I was really surprised when, after a few attempts, I got pitch black quills. Especially since some folks claim that doing black with natural dyes is next to impossible.

I'm really interested in your results with logwood. I've tried that once and the result was... strange.
Cotton cloth would turn brown instead of blue or purple and quills didn't accept the dye. After adding vinegar the cloth would turn almost black and the quills a pale yellow. Funny.
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the warrior yeti
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September 24th, 2008, 3:23 pm #10

Really nice stuff up top, and thanks for the dye recipes. Your English is perfect. Are you originally from Germany or a native English speaker?

There is at least one German making buckskin. Hartung on this site does buckskin and vegetable tanned leather from Hirsch (red deer). Not that I'm recommending him to you for trade, but if you get interested in tanning its definitely possible. There are lots of Hirsch farms over there and should be a good source of hides. If you live in the city perhaps you could find someplace out of town to work. Also, if you get the chance to trade for buckskin that's not a bad idea, since you'll be able to see what the finished product should look like if you ever decide to try making your own.

-Devin
In farewell, and yet not in farewell, the Master handed me his best bow. "When you shoot with this bow you will feel the spirit of the Master near you. Give it not into the hands of the curious! And when you have passed beyond it, do not lay it up in remembrance! Destroy it, so that nothing remains but a heap of ashes."

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inwabo
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September 25th, 2008, 12:33 am #11

Michael - beautiful work! Thanks for posting!

Patrick
Patrick Farneman
N.E. Washington, USA
http://www.bridgestothepast.org/
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Quillsnkiko
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September 25th, 2008, 1:33 am #12

Hi Michael, I was off work today so went for a ride looking for some items along the road side.. sumac was one of them. while I did not get any of that today..I will this weekend. as about 1/4 mile from me along a gravel road there is plenty of it.I intend to collect a bunch of the berrie tops...even if they are a bit dry as fall is in the air here.I did get a lot of wild grapes , which I am in the process of steam extracting the juice from with a steam juicer that came from Germany. I also got a lot of poke berries which really stained my hands getting them.I will not put them in my juicer since they are poisonous..but I will extract the juice from them and freeze it to later use for trying at dyeing quills with it will be fine ..I don't put quills in my mouth any more....
The log wood crystals I will mix some with the black dye or brown ???? I am thinking.
I do have black walnut dye powder........as well as real black walnuts with the hulls in my yard...
So if I understand what you did above for black... first you dyed some quills yellow....then you dyed the yellow quills ..with indigo . then you dyed the result of that with a red dye bath??? and it ended up black???? Interesting .yes your black is black.
I am going to collect some blood root roots soon as well for red before things lose their leaves and one can't find it in the woods.
I have dock growing down along my road. madder might be a problem.


I guess ... what my thinking has been on natural dye verses rit dye or any other kind of commercial dye... that if you don't use roots , berries and stuff you collect.... and instead buy boxed indigo... or other stuff which is commercially made .... to add to the dye... its really not natural dye... and just as commercial as commercial dye. My thinking may be faulty..... but thats how I feel.
If I get a lot of sumac.... I will let you know and possibly I can send you some.
Your colors are beautiful. That unfinished piece with the 2 color green & yellow sawtooth and simple band technique is stunning.What is it going to be finished??
" You can't stop the waves .... but, you can learn to surf."
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Michael Bootz
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September 25th, 2008, 6:43 am #13

Hi Devin,
no, I'm not a native English speaker, I'm German.
I might try to get some hides from deer farms, gotta check if there are any nearby. But getting stuff is sometimes quite ...difficult... over here and I never understood why. For example I've tried getting intestine for sausage making or sinew from butchers, but no way, they don't give you any. It's not that I didn't want to pay for the stuff...

Quills,
yes, you're right about the black. That's exactly what I do. I was quite surprised that the quills come out really black.
I don't think that it has to be madder, conicheal will also do and you could probably use blood root as well.
I can get you some madder if you want to. Maybe we could do a trade? I'd be interested in blood root, black walnuts and sumac.
I've always wanted to try blood root but I can't get it over here and since American black walnuts is a different species than our European one I thought that might be the reason why it didn't work very well for me.

I understand your thinking about natural dyes not being as natural if you don't gather them yourself. But in most cases I think you just don't have a choice. I cannot gather a lot of the stuff that I use because it doesn't grow anywhere near where I live. And extracting indgo from plants is, as far as I know, a whole lot of work. So for me what counts most is that I actually use stuff that's totally natural and does not come from any chemical factory. For example I buy only indigo that was extracted form plants and I don't buy synthetic indigo...

The piece you mentioned is going to be a plains style quiver and bowcase. The quiver is almost finished, I just have to cut the fringe and sew it together at the top. I still have to do some quilling for the bowcase, though.
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Hartung
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September 25th, 2008, 9:25 am #14

Michael, very nice quillwork and great pics!



Quills, a German company named Hudsons Bay is selling leather that they call brain tanned and I'm quite sure that Michael knows that company. But I don't know their quality.
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Quillsnkiko
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September 25th, 2008, 3:38 pm #15

These 2 deer hides I have that are fish oil tanned.. & smell like cod liver oil... ( why Ive never made anything from them ) Ive always been going to smoke them to cover up that fishy smell.Ive had them for 10 years or more and the smell has not lessened.but the texture is awesome and they are large and light weight.
I have some real braintanned hides as well .... Ive been amin t make a dress from as well. just not enought time..yet.
I will try to get out on a piece of land I have access to that has never been logged..here in the hills of north east Iowa... and dig some blood root if I can still find it. It was all over this spring when I went morel mushroom hunting...but Ive no idea how much of the leaves etc will be left for me to find them in the other weeds & garlic Mustard that have taken over the land. Ive been wanting to get out and look for some thing else any way....so this way I can take a look in a neat natural area..that is not grazed by cattle. I will also go down the road and get some sumac.
In that book" Medicinal and other uses of North American Plants" ..in talking about sumac by a canadian pharmacy in 1871.... it says ....
" We have stated that sumac is used for tanning and dyeing. For these purposes the user generally makes his own decoctions, and uses them fresh and warm. It is stated that the liquor injures by standing. For tanning it is valued as it does not discolor the leather.....In dyeing it is used to produce a fawn and a rich yellow, a black , a peculiar shade of greeen and a red. The mordants are usually tin or amuminous substances. With Brazil wood and tin solution it produces a red. With copperas and log wood a rich permanent black. With a solution of chloride of tin alone , a rich yellow, and this with Prussian blue, shades of green.
It is used chiefly as a base, and has a quality of giving permanency to the colors dyed with it. the leaves of the Staghorn sumac , the hairy species , are considered best to dye yellow.The berries make a very refreshing and cooling beverage when ripe. They should by all means be kept out of the gathered leaves as they contain a red dye, hence woud affect the quality of the leaves.
Staghorn sumac is te variety that grow along gravel roads all over here bouts.
another referance is by H Smith in 1932.." The Flambeau Ojibwe use the inner bark and the central pith of the stem of the sumac mixed with blood root , to obtain a Orange color. the material is boiled in the mixture. "
"The berries owe their acidity to malic acid which is contained in the pubescence which covers them."
In 1748 a fellow wrote..."to dye red , there is a plant on the prairie of the Tamacoua a plant that they name red micousiouaki ( Lithospermum ) , they take the root , dry it, pulvarize it with a mortar, and boil it with the berries 3 times as many sumac berries as root, the red is very beautiful. The branches boiled with the berries yield a black ink like tincture."
" You can't stop the waves .... but, you can learn to surf."
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the warrior yeti
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September 27th, 2008, 5:35 am #16

Wow. There is a lot of cool info on dyes here. I'm new to this, but have collected some walnuts I plan on experimenting with. I'll see if I can find instructions, and I'm also interested in the Osage Orange dye. Is that through seed pods, roots or bark?

-Devin
In farewell, and yet not in farewell, the Master handed me his best bow. "When you shoot with this bow you will feel the spirit of the Master near you. Give it not into the hands of the curious! And when you have passed beyond it, do not lay it up in remembrance! Destroy it, so that nothing remains but a heap of ashes."

Basketmakeratlatl.com
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Quillsnkiko
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September 27th, 2008, 12:41 pm #17

I believe you can use osage wood shavings or sawdust..... Devin for osage orange dye. the inner wood is quite orange colored. the outer is lighter.
It makes good firewood ( burns real hot ) as well as bows..and is awesome for handles of hide scrapers, as its heavy & very pretty wood and when your finished working with it ..u have a piece of art as well as something very servicable.
" You can't stop the waves .... but, you can learn to surf."
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Michael Bootz
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September 27th, 2008, 2:50 pm #18

Yes, I also use osage sawdust or shavings. Just soak them in water and simmer a little. I've tried dyeing a piece of cotton cloth with it and I got a really nice deep orange color.
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the warrior yeti
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September 27th, 2008, 5:22 pm #19

Awesome. I'll try that out definitely, and it should be easy since I've been working this wood lately. I make atlatls out of it. A very beautiful wood indeed. The one I've been making lately is from an unhealthy branch with a hollow center, and dark cracks radiating out. There are dark streaks running through the atlatl that I didn't anticipate, and it makes for a nice texture.

-Devin
In farewell, and yet not in farewell, the Master handed me his best bow. "When you shoot with this bow you will feel the spirit of the Master near you. Give it not into the hands of the curious! And when you have passed beyond it, do not lay it up in remembrance! Destroy it, so that nothing remains but a heap of ashes."

Basketmakeratlatl.com
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Michael Bootz
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November 17th, 2008, 8:54 am #20

Here's my latest piece, finished it this weekend:



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