Question on night shade

EB Jones
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EB Jones
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Joined: March 18th, 2005, 8:43 am

August 5th, 2010, 4:07 pm #1

I have discovered night shade in the back.Now I had seen this a few years ago in the lot across the street and never knew what it was. Finally found some pic doing google.
Question, does Night Shade have thorns? And will it produce an itching sting when handles.
These I have found  do exactly that, they look exactly as the pic's I have seen, but cannot tell if there are thorns, also the berries are about the size of a smallish crab apple, have not seen them ripe so cannot tell what color they would be. Any ideas if I have found night shade , and what caution should one take with this as I thought it was poisonous ...but links say useful as a medicinal?? Makes no sense to me

Thanks for your replies
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Quillsnkiko
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August 5th, 2010, 4:24 pm #2

I think what you are describing is Horse Nettle...of which I have a ton of growing just across the fence in the cow pasture.some of it is 3 ft tall. or more....Ive been meaning to get over the fence and spray the darn stuff with roundup but have not had the time.cows won't touch it though ...but the seeds spread and Ive had a few plants coming up in my garden.. plant has spines and is stickery....flea beatles eat the leaves some times full of holes..if you have eggplants growing near it you can see the similar looking leaves etc..etc..plant growth habit, flower look , etc.plant is toxic..berries poisonous...but used as topical medicines for different things....a plant to be careful of if you are taking it internally..better know what you are doing... or you will no longer have to worry. I have also a lot of ground cherries ...tame ones gone wild..and you can see the similar looks of those plants to the horse nettles..they are all in the same family. Quills
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EB Jones
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August 5th, 2010, 4:32 pm #3

Thanks Quills...Horse Nettle is it exactly....not to worry I don't plan on using it for anything...
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Lady Nauriel
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August 6th, 2010, 4:08 pm #4

The question on nightshades being poisonous is one I'd been wondering about myself for years, and recently came across the answer:

There are entirely different species of plants all referred to as "nightshade". To add to the confusion, up until the 1950's even the scientific names of them were treated as interchangeable, often by people who should have known better, such as detectives and ethnobotanists.

Atropa belladonna is one nightshade that is highly toxic. If someone died from eating nightshade berries, chances are it was probably belladonna. The flowers and berries are purple,

Solanum nigra, and some of its close relatives like S. melanocerasum, have white-to-yellowish flowers and dark purple berries. These berries are safe to eat when ripe. There are cultures that also eat the early spring greens after boiling in several changes of water to leach out the poisons, but personally I'd rather find easier greens. These are sometimes sold under names such as "wonderberry" or "garden huckleberry".

Check each nightshade carefully, as there are hundreds of them, each with different properties.
Last edited by Lady Nauriel on August 6th, 2010, 4:17 pm, edited 2 times in total.
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EB Jones
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August 6th, 2010, 4:22 pm #5

Lady Nauriel wrote: The question on nightshades being poisonous is one I'd been wondering about myself for years, and recently came across the answer:

There are entirely different species of plants all referred to as "nightshade". To add to the confusion, up until the 1950's even the scientific names of them were treated as interchangeable, often by people who should have known better, such as detectives and ethnobotanists.

Atropa belladonna is one nightshade that is highly toxic. If someone died from eating nightshade berries, chances are it was probably belladonna. The flowers and berries are purple,

Solanum nigra, and some of its close relatives like S. melanocerasum, have white-to-yellowish flowers and dark purple berries. These berries are safe to eat when ripe. There are cultures that also eat the early spring greens after boiling in several changes of water to leach out the poisons, but personally I'd rather find easier greens. These are sometimes sold under names such as "wonderberry" or "garden huckleberry".

Check each nightshade carefully, as there are hundreds of them, each with different properties.
"Check each nightshade carefully, as there are hundreds of them, each with different properties."
EXTREMELY GOOD ADVICE M"LADY!!  As there seems to be a rash of talk of night shade of late
  
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Quillsnkiko
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August 7th, 2010, 5:04 am #6

Interestingly enough is there is a plant ..which originally came from africa I believe which has large purple berries on it ..which is in the nightshade family..which is a garden berry...grown as a annual. Ive grown it in past years many times but the name of it escapes me at the moment.... It makes great pies....
My youngest brother ate a couple of nightshade berries back in the 50's when he was a little kid....I can remember my mom dosing him with exlax...big time....we were scarred for a few hours....
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Shaykh Idris
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August 7th, 2010, 10:02 am #7

yep} Solanum nigrum: http://www.hort.purdue.ed.../solanum_nigrum_nex.html
been eating for the last 20 years:& African Box Thorn::  lol
http://www.northwestweeds....au/african_boxthorn.htm
Identification is the number one skill: you either know, or you don't.
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Ingvildr
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August 7th, 2010, 4:06 pm #8

Out in the Western Washington state neck of the woods we have a variety of nightshade called European bittersweet.  It is one of the top five noxious weeds in the county I live in.  It is considered mildly poisonous and a very agressive weed.  It is one that I have had to point out to my kids when they were 3 or 4 years old so they wouldn't eat them.  They tend to grow in the same areas as Himalayan Blackberries(a major pest and escapee from cultivation) It has a small red berry with purple and yellow flowers and leave that look a great deal like tomato leaves.  It is very common here.  Plants of the Pacific Northwest Coast lists it as Solanum dulcamara.  I've only seen black nightshade once in all my wanderings.

Ingvildr
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Quillsnkiko
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August 7th, 2010, 6:27 pm #9

around here that bittersweet nightshade is a sort of vine like... though .....Ive never seen it really long..... but it grows up other weeds. I have several different nightshades growing on the North side of my house in some hostas Ive not thouroughly weeded because of time and energy. nightshade is a real common weed around here and there are several kinds... you can recognise them as nightshades by their leaves & flowers ..which all look sort of similar.Ive never really examined the inside of a nightshade berry but I'm sort of thinking they are a lot like Ground cherrys....whcih have several hundred seeds in one berry.I have them all growing along a cattle fence and into the cow pasture..tame ground cherrys. wild ground cherrys, huge horse nettles, nightshades ...you name it. their flowers do however attract bees...and such. Quills
" You can't stop the waves .... but, you can learn to surf."
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domin
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domin
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August 7th, 2010, 9:56 pm #10

earlier today i ate the berry of a plant which is in the nightshade family and it was delicious, a big ol juicy tamater.

in certain areas they used to consider tomamtoes poisonous for their close relationship with nightshades, and while the fruit is great i have at least read in the past that tomamtoe leaves and plant parts can be fairly poisonous.
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Peter
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August 8th, 2010, 3:47 am #11

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Quillsnkiko
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February 20th, 2016, 4:07 am #12

Peter that link is a very good one.I wonder though ....is anyone here eating the black ripe berries in the summer time?

I guess I would be afraid to ...myself. at this stage of the game. I may have seen your link 5 years ago but forgot about it and ran across it tonight in another place. Quills
" You can't stop the waves .... but, you can learn to surf."
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