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Manufacture of stone tools, knives and arrowheads by lithic reduction
VirginiaKnapper
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VirginiaKnapper
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Joined: March 13th, 2018, 4:32 pm

March 30th, 2018, 2:13 am #21

Here, in Virginia, we are blessed to have the best axe and celt stone around, in fact the only location where the greenstone is knappable, however, we are not so lucky when it comes to rock for other things such as points and knives, though they an be very sharp (occasionally sharper than chert/flint) and are very durable. Basically, I am trying to say is that we have a lot of tough stone to work with, and we make what we can (or they did), and in particular, quartzite. All quartzite is grainy, and can be heat treated. However, though it can be heat treated, it mostly affects the color, and does not often make a difference in workability from what I have read, but is has been stated that it can effect the workability in terms of elasticity, meaning it crumbles more. I hope this helps, I figured I could relate to your post due to the topic of heat treatment on tough and grainy stone. One of the things I love about primitive skills is that it takes experience to learn and become better, so could try and heat treat it, though it can be difficult.

Frank
"It's about what you learn, not what you make" - Erret Callahan
"Win some, lose some, and sometimes ran out" - Kenny Roberts
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Chippintuff
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Chippintuff
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Joined: January 21st, 2011, 12:25 am

March 30th, 2018, 3:02 am #22

Virginia Frank, here is my latest deep notch with narrow entry. How to do it depends a lot on the tool used and the technique used, and there are many. The things I consider to be key are:

1) Get the notch area thin with flake scars that run the same way the notch is to go. If the point is not thin, and/or the flake ridges cross the notch path, make a different style point.

2) Coming off the edge, the taper of increasing thickness needs to be very gradual to get a narrow entry. If the thickness increases quickly as the notch goes further into the rock, it will be hard to keep the entry narrow. In general, the thicker the point, the wider the notch has to be, so as the notch goes further into the point, it will become necessary to widen the notch if the thickness continues to increase, or it will stall.

3) In the bottom of the notch (where the flaking action happens), always square the corners after taking a flake, then turn it over to take the next flake and repeat squaring the corners each time right after taking the flake.

4) I pressure my notches in, but I do it like punching. As the point gets thicker and thicker, I find that I have to apply more and more pressure against the platform as if I were trying to split the point from end to end (and I have done that) while I push to detach the flake. This is more important than it might seem, if you use the same method I use.

5) Keep all edges of the notching tool filed square. As soon as the edge(s) get rounded and have burrs, the tool is about to stall out.

6) The amount of "bite" you take on the platform each time is something you will have to experiment with. If you take too little bite, you just push the platform off and stall. If you take too much "bite", the flake will not detach, or the point's ear will pop off.

WA
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IMG_2352.JPG
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PaleoSoul
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PaleoSoul
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Joined: January 21st, 2018, 4:33 pm

March 30th, 2018, 2:19 pm #23

Is the Danish Flinthead on this site??

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VirginiaKnapper
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VirginiaKnapper
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March 31st, 2018, 12:11 am #24

Thank you very much WA! I tried today flaking the corners in the direction of the notch, however, the flakes seem to step if the platform is too thin, but I found that slightly reshaping with a flake pass can take out the step, I guess the important thing that I did today was not make a suitable point, but learn something new. I also see where you expanded your notch, nice Calf Creek by the way. Anyway, thank you very much for the tips, and I will definitely apply them from now on.

Frank
"It's about what you learn, not what you make" - Erret Callahan
"Win some, lose some, and sometimes ran out" - Kenny Roberts
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VirginiaKnapper
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VirginiaKnapper
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March 31st, 2018, 12:19 am #25

This is what I made today, I was successful in making flakes when the notch got thick, however, there where some mistakes along the way and the notches looked slightly different.

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"It's about what you learn, not what you make" - Erret Callahan
"Win some, lose some, and sometimes ran out" - Kenny Roberts
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Troy Harkey
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Joined: February 10th, 2009, 9:48 pm

April 9th, 2018, 1:20 am #26

I've got a new question or maybe some advice.  So I got me a rock err turkey roaster recently.  Today I went to get a bag of playground sand.  All the sand they had looked wet.  The playground sand looked wet.  They had a bag called "premium" sand that said it was washed and dried.  It too looked wet, but I went ahead and got it.  I get home and dump it into a 5 gallon bucket and sure enough, it's wet.  So I decided I can probably dry it out by putting it all in the roaster and setting it at around 200 and letting it cook overnight.  Do you think this will work?  I sure was wanting to start cooking rocks tonight, but looks like I'll have to settle for cooking sand first.  Oh yea, I was going to set it outside, but our stupid mild Indiana winter doesn't want to give up.  It's supposed to start snowing again any minute.  I left it in the garage on the concrete floor.  At that low of temperature, I don't see any harm in it.  Might make the garage a little humid.  If anyone has any thoughts about this, I welcome it.
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catfishwilly
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catfishwilly
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April 9th, 2018, 2:20 am #27

That will work. I dried mine in a roaster. Just leave the lid off and stir it every  now and then. Not positive but It might be actually faster to dry a half load at a time and kind of mound it up around the sides and have less in the center. I wouldn't be afraid to maybe turn it up to 250 or a little more just check it and use best judgment. Hope this helps.
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Chippintuff
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Chippintuff
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April 9th, 2018, 2:48 am #28

That would be a good way to dry the sand. I do not see any harm in cranking the temp up pretty high. When I cook rocks, the sand sometimes gets up to 550*F. All that does is turn the sand a little redder. I have been reusing the same bag of play sand for years, and it seems as good as ever. I am always cautious to make sure nothing combustible is anywhere near the roaster or the cord powering it. Sometimes the cord will heat up some.

WA
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WillmcUtah
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WillmcUtah
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Joined: March 12th, 2018, 2:46 am

April 12th, 2018, 1:52 am #29

How can I protect my left hand from getting shredded? I’ve been knapping for about 2 years. Never wore a glove. I’ve always got cut but figured that’s part of knapping. I’ve been working a lot of obsidian I dug from glass buttes. I even look at it and it slices me open. My wife is going to kill me for getting blood all over the house if I don’t bleed to death first. I’ve tried a leather glove but I can’t feel the rock. I was thinking a thin strong glove or a way to wrap my fingers. What have u guys tried?
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Chippintuff
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Chippintuff
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April 12th, 2018, 3:09 am #30

Willmc, try nitrile gloves. They allow a pretty good feel and give pretty good protection. They are $5.00 or less at the hardware store. I do not like to work obsidian or glass because of blood loss, but glass is what I learned on.

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boletus
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boletus
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April 12th, 2018, 3:54 am #31

I use gorilla grip gloves from home depot. I cut off each fingertip at the first joint. They are pretty thin to begin with. It probably wouldnt save you from a really bad mishap, but Id like to think it would offer enough protection in that instance to keep you from clipping a tendon.

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Troy Harkey
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Troy Harkey
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April 12th, 2018, 2:30 pm #32

I use a pair of cut resistant gloves.  The ones I got are a very thin stretchy material with a thin rubber coating in the palm area.  I can feel well with them.  They were less than $10 on X-bay.
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nogie1717
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April 12th, 2018, 8:24 pm #33

I don't wear a glove as any time I've tried, I just don't have the "feel" for the flake removal.  And when working certain materials, especially obsidian/dacite, I'm almost guaranteed to cut myself.  Where are your cuts?  The vast majority of mine are on my ring finger, between the first and second knuckle where the finger touches the middle finger.  It's due to the way I support and flakes flying off the rock and into the finger.  If you are experiencing cuts in specific spots like that, some athletic tape might be a good protection method that will allow you to still feel the rock.
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VirginiaKnapper
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VirginiaKnapper
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April 12th, 2018, 8:48 pm #34

I use, not to be a smart-alec, a leather pad, folded to where it is thick. Most of my cuts come from wiping away the small debitage that did not come off when I shook the pad.  learned that it is a really good idea for it to be thick so as to not puncture through. One time the tip of one of my Ishi sticks punctured through my palm, like the entire layer of skin, that was when I started to thicken the leather even more.

Frank
"It's about what you learn, not what you make" - Erret Callahan
"Win some, lose some, and sometimes ran out" - Kenny Roberts
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PaleoSoul
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PaleoSoul
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April 12th, 2018, 10:49 pm #35

When I work Obsidian or Dacite I wrap my fingers with a small amount of athletic tape. Not all the time but usually the index, middle and ring tips. If I cut myself somewhere else Ill wrap it with tape and it stops the bleeding just fine. I hate gloves and will not wear them unless I'm doing huge spalling

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WillmcUtah
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WillmcUtah
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April 13th, 2018, 12:17 am #36

It’s the inside of my ring finger and middle finger. Thanks for all the ideas
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WillmcUtah
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WillmcUtah
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April 13th, 2018, 12:32 am #37

Chippintuff wrote: Willmc, try nitrile gloves. They allow a pretty good feel and give pretty good protection. They are $5.00 or less at the hardware store. I do not like to work obsidian or glass because of blood loss, but glass is what I learned on.

WAMC/another Willmc
I noticed your initials when I signed up. My middle initial is A also
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ww
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ww
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Joined: June 7th, 2016, 6:46 pm

April 16th, 2018, 5:10 am #38

Does this look like knappable rock? I think it is basalt,(with some orange paint) and kind of grainy. I am new at this, but the flake looks like some I have seen In paleoknapperjims videos. 383.JPG 385.JPG
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VirginiaKnapper
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VirginiaKnapper
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April 16th, 2018, 8:58 pm #39

It may not be easy to knap, but it definitely appears to be knappable; the shape of the flake itself and the flakes taken off state is what tells me. A lot of the knappable stuff around here is tough and grainy, most notably quartzite.
"It's about what you learn, not what you make" - Erret Callahan
"Win some, lose some, and sometimes ran out" - Kenny Roberts
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ww
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ww
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April 16th, 2018, 10:43 pm #40

Maybe not easy. The stone was frozen down in the driveway and clobbered by the snow plow. Still waiting on some snow to melt to find the other part. Just have to figure out a different way to do what the plowtruck did. Any ideas?
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