"Pohutukawa" Bow

"Pohutukawa" Bow

Te Waoko
Registered User
Te Waoko
Registered User
Joined: 25 Oct 2006, 13:01

31 Mar 2007, 03:28 #1



Well I finally went and finished this branch that I cut down a couple of months ago. It actually came under weight which was a bit dissapointing. I haven't done that for ages. I was trying to get it real thin so it would dry fast, but I went slightly too far. Its made from Pohutukawa. There is some info and a picture below. sorry they're so small. I saw quite laot on the streets in Venice Calafornia and San Fran while I was there.

It is about 69" ntn. 55# (wanted 60-65#, damn!) @ 29" draw. I was pretty lazy with the tiller. It shoots fine. not the fastest bow though. It has some compression fractures probably due to my tiller (Idon't know, wasn't in the mood or something) and maybe the wood isn't as good in compression as tension. Well actually I can say it is diffinately better in tension. It has alot of pin knots aswell. So anyway, theres another wood to add to the long list of bow woods (short list of NZ bow woods).





POHUTUKAWA Sg .83

Also known as New Zealand Christmas Tree or Fire Tree, the Maori named Phutukawa (Metrosideros excelsa, synonym Metrosideros tomentosa) is an evergreen tree of the myrtle family that produces flowers made up of a mass of red stamens (sometimes yellow). It is native to coastal regions of the North Island of New Zealand.

Pohutukawa grow to around fifteen metres, with a fairly large round canopy. They flower in late December (the southern hemisphere summer), with a brilliant crimson flower covering the canopy, hence their nickname. Larger specimens typically have aerial roots which support a spreading canopy.

The variety "Aurea", which has yellow flowers, is descended from a pair discovered in 1940 on Motiti Island in the Bay of Plenty.

In New Zealand, Pohutukawa are under threat due to browsing by the common brushtail possum introduced from Australia.

Pohutukawa was introduced to coastal California, where it is a popular street and lawn tree; San Francisco's Friends of the Urban Forest estimates that it is the third-most-commonly planted street tree in San Francisco over the last two decades.
Reply
Like

Guest
Posts 0
Guest

31 Mar 2007, 03:43 #2

Sam, a more circular tiller on that bow would likely prevent the frets, but a nice bow still...

Interesting, that wood is one of the myrtles...related to guava and a bunch of other good bow woods.
Reply

Te Waoko
Registered User
Te Waoko
Registered User
Joined: 25 Oct 2006, 13:01

31 Mar 2007, 04:25 #3

Yeah I know It needs a more circular tiller. Like I said I was lazy. Kind of sad. I probably could have made a real nice shooting bow from that peice of wood. I haven't been very motivated to make bows lately. I could make it circular but I'll loose alot of weight. Maybe I can heat treat it. It was mainly just to see if the wood was any good. Pohutukawa is a good bow wood.
Reply
Like

toxophileken
Registered User
toxophileken
Registered User
Joined: 15 Jan 2006, 04:55

31 Mar 2007, 05:21 #4

Sam!! Good to hear from you again, dude!

Don't sweat the small stuff... Hard to be inspired when you're not surrounded by semi-crazed bowscrapers like you were when you came out to visit.

Fortunately for you, even your bad bows are still pretty good...

You never know, you might like to have a lighter bow to teach somebody else how to shoot.

Get you some more wood and get it dryin' so you can redeem yourself when you are in the mood...

I know you have been busy, but can't wait to hear more about your primitive adventures down there.

Been too busy to go after the rabbits... No "March Madness" at all so far...

Ken
Reply
Like

ber643
Registered User
ber643
Registered User
Joined: 28 Jan 2006, 09:08

31 Mar 2007, 16:45 #5

Sam, I got a sneaky feeling you aren't going to be satisfied 'til you "make it right" - even if at a lighter draw, as Ken says. So I'll wait until then to get the Full Draw pic (although this one has a nice background - LOL.) Good to see you posting.Bernie - "Hunters Are People Too"
Reply
Like

Richard Saffold
Registered User
Richard Saffold
Registered User
Joined: 08 Nov 2005, 23:51

31 Mar 2007, 17:47 #6

Sam, I appreciate this..those trees grow here as well. I never would have thought they were good for bows..

I like the view behind you in the pic..

Don't "fret" about your bow, you can always "pike" it and heat it up ,and get the tiller rounder..

RichRichards Bowyery
GoodlandArchery.com
Reply
Like

jim73
Registered User
jim73
Registered User
Joined: 19 Jun 2006, 19:43

04 Apr 2007, 00:31 #7

Hi Sam,
I've handled a nice bow made of Rata made by a guy here in Waikato. It was a good bow. I've also got a couple of Titoki staves on the drying rack. I made a mini bow from a splinter and it was fast so titoki could be promising.
Nice view. Do you live on Mt Pleasent Rd?

James
Reply
Like

Salvador6
Registered User
Salvador6
Registered User
Joined: 31 Jul 2005, 13:15

04 Apr 2007, 03:02 #8

I like the names of those trees.
Reply
Like

toxophileken
Registered User
toxophileken
Registered User
Joined: 15 Jan 2006, 04:55

04 Apr 2007, 03:18 #9

Yeah, those NZ names are great...

Sam, how are the bows you made while you were out here shooting?

Have you used your furniture making skills to figure out a new takedown system?

Ken
Reply
Like

Te Waoko
Registered User
Te Waoko
Registered User
Joined: 25 Oct 2006, 13:01

04 Apr 2007, 03:19 #10

Yeap. Mt Pleasant. Well thats where I'm crashing at the moment anyhow. You from ChCh then.
What kind of Rata was it, North or South. Vine Rata?.
I would like to get my hands on some Rewarewa. I got some Kowhai to try out. Its all dry and waiting to be made into a bow. D you know anyone thats used kowhai. I'll look out for Titoki.
I don't know anyone else in NZ who is into primitive tech apart from Kiwi coote who posts on this forum sometimes. Never meet the guy though.

Thanks for the replys everyone. I've heat treated it now and I'm going to re tiller it. It got some more cracks so I gotta fill them up with super glue. It must be nice and dry now.

Hey ken. Ah all the bows I made in CA are fine as far as know. I got 2 weeks of course so I'll have time to go up into the southern Alps to do a bit of hunting. As long as it isn't pissing with rain like every other time I've been able to go up there to mountains. I read that long as e-mail. I'm getting round to replying.
Reply
Like

toxophileken
Registered User
toxophileken
Registered User
Joined: 15 Jan 2006, 04:55

04 Apr 2007, 03:58 #11

Great, Sam.

Rain can be bad for blood trailing, but good for stalking... Some areas you could normally never still hunt you can get close to game to when the ground is wet.

Too bad Tom misspelled your name up top. "Wacko"... Well, sort of appropriate, eh? Ha ha.

Ken
Reply
Like

jim73
Registered User
jim73
Registered User
Joined: 19 Jun 2006, 19:43

04 Apr 2007, 06:45 #12

Hi Sam,
Yeah I went Lincoln (baaa) and liked CHCH so much I stayed on for a few years.
Anyway that bow has made from northern Rata. I've heard rumours from an old timer that kowhai is good. The grain looks very much like elm, but it is harder. When you think about it, kowhai trees look very much like laburnum. Kowahi wood is also poisonous so watch it.
I never had much luck with rewarewa. It fretted badly. It didn't even work as a core wood in a glass bow.
Kanuka is the best wood i've found so far, but I think from some mini bows i've made; titoki, Lancewood, lemonwood(pittosporum), akeake and nikau (if you can bring yourself to cut one down) all show promise.
Failing that, there is plenty of good yew in parks and cemetries in and around ChCh.

James
Reply
Like