beardedhorse
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beardedhorse
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May 15th, 2018, 11:25 pm #21

I wonder if most people would be confused by the proper term for a four pole support structure called a quadripod  (sp?)?   Interesting and workable alternative to the tripod so commonly used on tipis.
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Robson Valley
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May 15th, 2018, 11:45 pm #22

I like to think of a "tripod" as having 3 legs but joined at the apex.

All the 4-post houses that I've seen or been in use the posts as the 4 corners of the world.
They hold up the roof beam structure.

You could join all 4 posts at an apex but I can't see how that holds up a roof
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Tomas
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May 16th, 2018, 4:12 pm #23

Hello RV

Earlier in this thread you will find two resources, one is the four pole tie system (illustrated) used by some Plains Indians and a Reindeer people who used a three forked pole system(see video) ...the Hidatsa people used a similar forked pole system but added fourth pole to create what they thought was a tighter lock of the poles(per Buffalo Bird Woman).

Both systems supported skin lodges, grass and turf roofing.

Tomas
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Tomas
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May 16th, 2018, 6:56 pm #24

Hello Folks

Here is an article about the Crow Tipi which has a four pole base system fully explained and the tie of the poles illustrated.

If one wished a four pole base you could probably not due better than the women of the Crow People.

https://anthrosource.onlinelibrary.wile ... 1.02a00060

Tomas
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Robson Valley
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May 18th, 2018, 2:57 am #25

You will see, from both old and contemporary examples in the Pacific Northwest, 
that the four corner posts support a frame which support the roof logs.

In the interior, the roofing material is the spoil from excavating the pit.
On the coast, the house boards are split from the multipurpose western red cedar.  
The biggest house that Franz Boas measured was a Haida dwelling, 40' wide and 100' long.
The biggest single house board was a split of western red cedar, 14' tall x 36" wide x 3/4" thick ( no mean accomplishment.)
Haida stripped their houses and carried those house boards by boat as they moved around seasonal camp villages.
Regional differences in design and construction.
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ramaytush
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June 19th, 2018, 4:49 am #26

i read an article that said the usual Pit River pit house had 3 support posts. With that quadripod model I made pictured ahove, could it have four support post to hold up those rafters?
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ramaytush
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June 19th, 2018, 4:52 am #27

I'm thinking about making a pithouse too, I found a spot that I think has deep enough soil. There are a lot of ponderosa pine poles growin there though so I will have to rip out some 4" diameter stumps. And hopefully the water table is low enough. It's a high spot in a riparian area 
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ramaytush
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June 19th, 2018, 5:00 am #28

Dead incense cedar trees have nice poles and the bark is easy to pull off. Juniper would also work but I'm not as farmilar with juniper. I would use fresh trees(or recently killed trees) for the support posts and the cross pieces and I would use dead trees for the roof. I can collect only green juniper, harvesting green cedar, pine, or white fir is not allowed in the nat'l forest. 
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ramaytush
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June 19th, 2018, 5:09 am #29

How thick should the roof poles be for a maybe 10' diameter pithouse?
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Tomas
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June 19th, 2018, 5:42 am #30

Hello Ramaytush

Highly recommend you the ancestors proven knowledge of the four pole tie system in post No.3 in this thread.

The link below will give you a proper scale of poles compatible with the four pole tie. The dimensions used for a 12’ Tipi should give you the proper strength your pit house project.

http://www.tipi.com/tipipoles/

All The Best

Tomas
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ramaytush
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June 20th, 2018, 1:22 am #31

What do you think about the 3 post pithouse described here?
IMG_2188.PNG
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Robson Valley
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June 20th, 2018, 1:40 am #32

This is a Pacific Northwest First Nations pit house, of central interior design.
This house is built with the knowledge and elders of Lleidli T'enneh.
You can see for yourself how the FN students were guided to cut and shape the log frame.
A loaded, wet soil covering means big posts.

http://www.unbc.ca/releases/34692/offic ... e-saturday
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ramaytush
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June 20th, 2018, 2:18 am #33

Yes, I need try to find and ask the elders.
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ramaytush
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June 20th, 2018, 2:21 am #34

I went up the the Klamath tribe headquarters to see their pithouse but it was deconstructed.
IMG_2187.JPG
IMG_2186.JPG
IMG_2185.JPG
IMG_2181.JPG
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ramaytush
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June 21st, 2018, 12:12 am #35

The thing I find weird about the description of the Pit River three post pithouse is that it doesn't mention it being covered with earth.
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Tomas
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June 21st, 2018, 3:27 am #36

Hello Ramaytush

It reads like it was covered in bark.

Tomas
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