Win1885
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Win1885
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9:17 AM - Aug 08, 2006 #21

Great pics, Ken. Tell me about that cool looking back quiver at the top of this page. Did you make it?
Tom I.
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Thimosabv
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10:51 AM - Aug 08, 2006 #22

I love seeing this stuff. Thanks ken.
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George Tsoukalas
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1:21 PM - Aug 08, 2006 #23

Ken, thanks for sharing. I love the pictures. You have become quite an ambassador for archery. Jawgehttp://mysite.verizon.net/georgeandjoni
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toxophileken
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6:20 AM - Aug 09, 2006 #24

Thanks guys. I'm glad you are enjoying these posts.

Tom, I haven't made any quivers yet, but it is on my list...

I was fortunate enough to win that quiver the first time I attended my Favorite Shoot of the Year - the Gene Foster Traditional Rendezvous, in Dunlap, Ca (in the mountains east of Fresno, near King's Canyon).

Saturday is a sort of archery carnival - shoot as much or as little as you like, paying as you go. Moving targets, pop up targets, balloons, speed rounds, etc. You accumulate Foster Bucks for each hit made at the various target set ups. Top three Foster Buck holders win a prize... The quiver was second prize, and I won it not by any great shooting skill, but because I was having so much fun I shot literally daylight to dark... Felt just like a little kid. Similarly, the following year I won first prize - a custom modern laminated longbow made to order by Vince Grgas (who, with his wife, puts on the Chamberlin Ranch event, giving the profits to charity... Vince donates a bow every year to the Gene Foster, and makes one for his own shoot as well).

Sunday is a very challenging hunting situation 3D shoot. At least you get to shoot and score two arrows, to learn how to sneak the arrow through the gaps in branches, or find out how you blew your shot. The evil genius (I mean kind hearted and wonderful man) who is responsible for making the Sunday shoot so tough, and who is one of the driving forces behind the great Gene Foster shoot, is a man named Roland Deever. He made and donated the quiver.

Ken
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Win1885
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9:20 AM - Aug 09, 2006 #25

Thanks, Ken.....it sounds like a great shoot. And it's the coolest quiver I've ever seen. I've made a couple quivers but never used a back quiver. I think I'd like to try one for 3-D matches. The shearling wool around the top has to be a big help keeping arrows from rattling around, and possibly even helps keep them from falling out if you bend over instead of stoop.
I've decided I really need a big quiver to carry more arrows when I shoot 3-D matches . Although I shot Sunday at Shippensburg, PA and only lost two arrows.....the fewest ever.
BUT....the guys I shoot with ( 3 or 4 traditionalists) don't keep score, or pay attention to distance markers....I sneak up on as many targets as I can......
Tom I.
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tom sawyer
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6:47 PM - Aug 09, 2006 #26

Great pics and excellent narrative.

I helped a friend put on a demonstration at a county fair a few years ago, that was one of the most enjoyable experiences I've had a a selfbowyer. I'd helped my friend cut a bunch of osage, and he was giving straves to people who werw interested. This one family of six showed special interest, and we helped them split some of the osage into workable staves. One of the kids got a stave that is without a doubt the best natural snakey osage stave I have ever seen. And I've seen a lot of osage here in MO. I still think about that stave. I have seriously considered buying it from the young man or trading him for bows or something. But the best gifts, hurt to let go of.
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toxophileken
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8:20 AM - Aug 11, 2006 #27

Thanks Tom and Tom.

Tom I. - I still haven't learned to use a back quiver effectively. It takes me a couple of clumsy reaches to grap an arrow, then a couple of clumsy tugs to get it out... I hope to make a plains indian style quiver such as Jay Massey describes in one of his books. Those I have seen seemed to make a lot of sense to me. The wooly fringe doesn't keep the arrows from falling out... I still often judge how I did at a shoot by how many arrows I have when I'm done...

Tom Sawyer - I think you are right. Giving away something that you don't really want or need anyway is no real test... "Giving til it hurts" isn't always necessary, but it says something about us, I think.
I hope you get to repeat your great demo experience, with or without your friend...

Ken
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toxophileken
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7:57 AM - Sep 16, 2006 #28

Went to watch my nephews and cousins bicycle race (motocross) tonight. Took my next HHB stave with me to start getting it closer to ready to bend.

Just a piece of wood and a rasp, mostly. A little work with a draw knife. You wouldn't believe how many people were interested... I would have thought I would have needed to be making a bicycle out of wood to get that much interest...

One old guy I met had made bows with his grandfather. They made strings from squirrel hides... He is going to show me how to make a "figure 4" trap trigger. I tried to talk him into coming to the meet on Sunday. He may make it. I hope so.

All you have to do is take a stave and a rasp with you somewhere where you will get bored with nothing to do with your hands, and where wood shavings or sawdust won't be objected to. People will show interest, and ask questions.

I will post more here later with photos of the bow and quiver I made my newphew for his birthday in deer camp (missed his Bday, so at least he gets something...). First I have to clear up a glitch with my photobucket deal...

Ken
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toxophileken
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7:44 AM - Sep 22, 2006 #29

Well, here are some photos of me working in deer camp, between trips into the woods to scare all the deer far far away.

This aspen grove is the exact place we used to camp when I was a kid. It was very nostalgiac for me to make a bow for my nephew in a place that holds so many happy memories, from 30 years and more ago... Directly behind me towards the darker evergreen trees is where my uncle would set the practice target. Between the two groves there you can see a road leading up that didn't used to be there (it is "closed"; but it didn't seem to stop people, anymore than my camp being there did...). That is where I started many of my hunts this trip. I remember walking there with my Dad... Seeing him shooting a deer, and finding the only complete arrowhead I ever found on the way back...





Here I am sanding the braced bow. You'll see some of these photos again when I post about the bow in a couple of days. I am sealing it, and will photograph it again then (after making a string). The tree I am under is the one we sat under around a campfire and my uncle played guitar while he and my cousins sang for us...





Here is a full draw photo.





Well, I just wanted to post a little about that here. I guess I will get more into it elsewhere.

I also wanted to say that you don't have to be where people can see you to have your own "bowyers' meet". I was pretty much alone, except for occasional other hunters. At night, I would work with a lantern after dinner for awhile. It was "elk central" (no elk tag for me- it is a draw), and I could hear them bugling over the hiss of the lantern. Does walked through sometimes. One walked right up, not far away. The lantern didn't bother her. She stopped suddenly and snorted when she saw me...

Anyway... It felt like a bowyers' meet. The photos under the tree were taken Sep. 10th, right at the time some of the guys were in Pasadena doing much the same thing. I guess what made it a "one man's bowyer meet" was that I was away from home... On location, so to speak.

I didn't use my tillering tree (though it was in the van)... And the only tools I used were my spokeshave, shinto rasp, scraper, ruler, nock file, and sandpaper. Add a drawknife, and you have all you need to work on a stave anywhere you like. The bench is nice, but optional. Add an axe, and you can process from log to bow right there... Everybody likes to have all sorts of tools (and I am right there with them...); but this kind of location work has proven to me again and again how little it really takes to make a bow...

Oh, is this why they call it Black Locust? Been wondering about that...





Ken
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toxophileken
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7:33 PM - May 22, 2007 #30

Sorry I haven't posted on this for awhile. Just taking it to the top, for now, so it doesn't get lost.

Ken
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Thimosabv
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4:23 PM - Mar 08, 2014 #31

I was searching for info on ash bows and came across this on google. I now remember this post and how cool it was. And for any who don't know Ken he is a really "interesting" fella to hang out with. Whether it is making bows, ruining 3d targets (even a moose) or just eating a great meal cooked by his lovely wife, (mountain lion and wild pig fajitas). We even got to hunt some very elusive jack rabbits.
Seeing this post again is just what I needed to motivate me for this seasons bow and primitive skills exhibitions. And yes I now think I may just have the courage to go out to the local park and make a bow or two.

Seriously really loved seeing this again.
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George Tsoukalas
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1:03 PM - Mar 15, 2014 #32

Thanks, Thimo. Ken's bows are so beautifully tillered as are yours. It has been fun to watch you both make bows over the years.
Jawge
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