NJ areas holding knappable stone?

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NJ areas holding knappable stone?

BillNJ
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BillNJ
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Joined: 01 Jan 2014, 22:02

01 Jan 2014, 22:02 #1

New to flint knapping and I am curious about any areas in NJ to collect a decent amount of stone. I know of a few places, but the locals are along highways where the roadway was cut through the bedrock. I'm looking for some that aren't as life threatening... Thanks in advance.
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Forager
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Forager
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Joined: 22 Oct 2010, 23:42

01 Jan 2014, 22:37 #2

Welcome, Bill. There's argillite along the Western third, some Outer Coastal Plain jaspers which are small and quite tough... the rare pebble of charcoal grey chert dropped off by the last glacier in the North... and huge amounts of quartzite which can be dangerously frustrating (the methodology is rather specialized and pursued by the exceptionally masochistic few) to somebody looking to enjoy a cool hobby like flintknapping.

If you wish to move forward with your knapping, order out. If you need an authentic experience of what the local Ancestors did, follow your path (and order out, to accommodate the equivalent of ancient trade). Don't limit your search to roadcuts, stream beds will also provide cobbles. Best of luck and enjoy the process!
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BillNJ
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BillNJ
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02 Jan 2014, 01:05 #3

I appreciate the quick reply. I'll definitely be keeping my eyes open. I have read that some people have been checking stones used to level ground used by the rail companies. Anything along those lines sound familiar?
I have been downloading NJ geographical charts, reports and other info contained often in the .pdf format. Seems to be holding some good information so far. Will keep you all informed.
Thanks for the welcome aboard.
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Forager
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Forager
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02 Jan 2014, 01:14 #4

I've looked along the rail corridors up here in Bergen County and have seen small chunks of limestone but nothing I'd consider knappable.
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NJhuman
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NJhuman
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Joined: 21 Nov 2013, 05:09

03 Jan 2014, 15:05 #5

Hey Bill!
I'm in NJ too, the most southern area.  Down here a trip to the beaches on the Delaware bay will find you some stone, but not always much at all.  As Forager said there are pebbles of chert/flint on the bay beaches.  Some is very good quality, some trash.  There are pebbles at Gandy's beach or around that area, and most bayside beaches in all of Cape May County.  Try Elsinboro too.  A few times a half hour walk with a little bucket I've found a dozen or two egg size pieces.  Not too exciting if you like a large format knap session.  But then once in a while a larger tennis ball size piece will turn up.  Brown, black, grey, mottled, you never know.  
If you want to try argillite just kayak down the Delaware a half hour drive above Trenton.  Maybe a little farther.  
Quartzite, it's out there on the Delaware River as dredge, or on Delaware River beaches.  Go for it.  
If you are way up north I can't help, sorry.  I have heard of really good finds on train tracks and I have walked a few.  I found a gravel bed made of soapstone chips once.  That was cool.
Good luck, and don't give up.
Evan
 
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BillNJ
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BillNJ
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04 Jan 2014, 01:09 #6

I'm in the seaside area, so I do have access to Bay beaches so I will keep my eyes peeled. I gave been down the Delaware a few times, but that was prior to wanting to start knapping...

Thanks for the input folks, I have been thinking of trying some bottle bottoms just to get a feel for it, also picking up some some from some online vendors. Seems like I would be able to get a decent amount of stone for not much dough.

Are there significant differences between copper and aluminum boppers? From what I read, alum lasts longer but isn't as easy to learn on. Any opinions would be appreciated.
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caveman2533
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caveman2533
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Joined: 02 Jul 2009, 01:12

04 Jan 2014, 21:34 #7

I would not suggest an aluminum bopper in any way shape or form. copper boppers are easy to come by but will not do you much good if you are wanting to use the local tuf stuff. Will work good for flints and cherts tho. Learn to knap argillite and you will never ever want for stone.
Steve Nissly
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BillNJ
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BillNJ
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05 Jan 2014, 02:36 #8

Thanks again. I figured you folks would appreciate this link I stumbled across in my travels. http://tin.er.usgs.gov/geology/state/sg ... =argillite
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