Tomas
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January 5th, 2018, 12:00 am #21

Quillsnkiko wrote: Interesting  the name of the inner fur room in Chukchi  tents .I'd seen a video by Dr Spencer Wells  on "The Journey of Man" ...where he stayed in a Chukchi dwelling in one of the  fur lined rooms with no additional heat other than a candle and his own body heat at 40 below and was perfectly warm thru the night .though he suffered from the cold during the day time .anyway..he did not name the  fur lined room just showed video of himslef inside it and said there was no additional heat source..and he was warm enough to sleep.

That picture you posted looks like it was fur on the outside as well as the inside in that picture . The outside tent in his video was a leather tent ..dehaired , reindeer hide .the inner one reindeer hide with the fur left on .

Quills
Hi Quills

Here is the film of the Chukchi polog you cited.....



All The Best

Tomas
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January 5th, 2018, 12:52 am #22

 Yes that is a very good scene from the documentary...thanks for posting that Tomas...🙂

Also its amazing how soft and pliable the outer-walls of their  tent was when they took it down.  It really looked to be soft and it was covered with frost so had to be smoked.

Quills
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March 4th, 2018, 6:53 pm #23

Hello Folks

These resources seemed to have a home here (special thax to Quest For Fire) as a concrete block version of the rocket stove would have excellent thermal mass for keeping the tipi warm and be great for cooking on. A type of bow could be constructed to to feed a 3” thick log (think of it as the ‘arrow’) to create a self feeding fire system.

Also thrown in is the use of the original Primitive rocket stove the Dakota Firehole used in a winter tipi and some delicious recipes good for any rocket stove of any kind.....





http://homestead-and-survival.com/18-wo ... eat-stove/


http://learn.eartheasy.com/2017/05/cook ... ket-stove/

Improvised Winter Teepee with Dakota Fire



Today’s Recipe: Duck Dinner in a Dakota Fire Hole

http://www.raisingjane.org/journal/26063

All The Best

Tomas
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March 7th, 2018, 5:41 am #24

Hello Folks

Along with the Rocket Stove and a Dakota Firehole a slow cooker called a Hay Box with a solar oven to boil your water you have a true fueless/flameless cooking system.

Thought folks would find this sort of Paleo Slow Cooker interesting along with the recipes it reccomends. There is the online book with recipes and a DIY how to build your own Hay Box. Included for ease of understanding (and modern concerns) is an article from Wikipedia.

All the above allows the Modern Paleo the luxury of multiple fuel saving devices and a virtual smoke free tipi plus a walk away food cooking system. Perhaps it is possible to get the work hours down to the four hours a day claimed for Our Paleo Ancestors.

Here are the links.....

Online Book

https://archive.org/stream/firelesscook ... 0/mode/2up‬


Wikipedia

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Haybox‬

All The Best

Tomas

Dakota Firehole Cooking

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March 7th, 2018, 5:54 am #25

Hello Folks

Here is a tipi build com Mother Rearth News any Modern Paleo would admire the title is self explanatory .....

How to Build a Tipi With Multiple Levels
Learn how one family built their own tipi with three floors, including building costs and specifics of the tipi construction.
By Judy McCoy
May/June 1982

https://www.motherearthnews.com/green-h ... az82mjzglo

All The Best

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March 8th, 2018, 5:32 am #26

Wow..... that's interesting Tomas...that last article.
" You can't stop the waves .... but, you can learn to surf."
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March 9th, 2018, 3:19 am #27

Hello

Posted this in another forum but seemed to have a home here (Quills glad you enjoyed the tipi build article)....

Hello Folks

Thought folks would enjoy this book....

Leslie Mansfield's The Lewis & Clark Cookbook

https://www.npr.org/templates/story/sto ... yId=973941

http://cookbookoftheday.blogspot.com/20 ... k.html?m=1

http://old.post-gazette.com/food/200304 ... 24fnp1.asp

Reviews

I also am a big Lewis and Clark buff; in addition, an avid cook, with my own cookbook. This book finally came out several months after it was supposed to, but it was worth the wait!
Most cookbooks, even the ones that sound like they should have exotic recipes, have the same old stuff, based on boring ingredients that produce ho-hum meals. Not this book! The author clearly knows about good food, and the recipes are a breath of fresh air. They're not terribly hard to make, either.
Visiting my folks over Christmas, the whole family decided to have a Lewis+Clark dinner, just for fun. Everyone helped, and we had: Parsnip Fritters, Sweet and Sour Red Cabbage, Shrimp Bisque, and since we couldn't decide between the Rack of Venison with Rosemary-Dijon Crust and Roast Duck with Blackberry Sauce, we had both of them! For dessert, it was Mocha Creme Pie. All were outstanding.
This book is a class act; I just wish there were a hardcover version.

...........

This is the most awesome of cookbooks! I love the recipes and really recommend the Maple Glazed Salmon, Buffalo Meatloaf, Spoonbread, and Pumpkin Pecan Loaf! I love cooking and always look for unusual cookbooks and this one is my favorite of more than 200 hundred that I own. I've given this cookbook as gifts to over 30 family and friends. Thanks to Leslie Mansfield for an outstanding cookbook!!!!

All The Best

Tomas
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March 11th, 2018, 2:19 am #28

Tomas all 3 of those links do not work...for the cook book. I am a Lewis & Clark fan as well...Ive got at least 10 books on the expedition...and what Indians felt about the expedition....from People descended from  the  different tribes of Indians who met him. And one on.... Plants of the Lewis & Clark expedition. Quills
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March 12th, 2018, 3:11 am #29

Hello Quills

Here is some of the content from the links...


Home > Lifestyle > Food Printer-friendly versionE-mail this story

Food
Cookbook author re-creates larder of Lewis & Clark's Corps of Discovery
Thursday, April 24, 2003

By Suzanne Martinson, Post-Gazette Food Editor

They ate nine pounds of meat a day, when they could get it. About 10,000 calories apiece -- five times more than today's desk jockey needs.



If you go
"Lewis & Clark Cookbook"

WHO: Author Leslie Mansfield

WHAT: Lecture and book signing by the woman who created Historic Recipes from the Corps of Discovery and Jefferson's America

WHEN: noon to 2 p.m. Saturday.

WHERE: Sen. John Heinz History Center, Strip District

COST: Free with admission to History Center ($6 for adults; $4.50, seniors 62 and older; $3, children 6 to 18; and $4.50, students)

Lewis & Clark recipes





Forty-five men and a woman, who carried a baby on her back.

Tough work, the Lewis and Clark Expedition, the great exploration of the American wilderness that is being celebrated across America on its 200th anniversary this year and beyond.

Exploration might not be exactly the right word for the journey that took two years, four months and 10 days.

"Most of their time was spent finding the food, so they could survive," says Leslie Mansfield, the author of "The Lewis & Clark Cookbook" (Celestial Arts; 2002; $17.95).

Yet when she read the abridged version of their journals, she found most of the food references had been taken out.

"They tossed out most food information," says Mansfield, who was interviewed by telephone at her St. Helena, Calif., home. The author will speak Saturday at the Sen. John Heinz Pittsburgh Regional History Center in the Strip District, and at a sold-out dinner tomorrow evening at the Pines Tavern, Pine.

Hunting for food wasn't just a man's job. "Sacajawea was instrumental as far as survival," says Mansfield, 45, a native of Lake Oswego, Ore. "She was always out ahead fishing, and she found needed carbohydrates for the group."

Even Lewis' dog, a huge Newfoundland named Seaman, got in on the foraging. "He pulled in a deer that had been shot in the middle of the river where the men couldn't get it," Mansfield says.

Seaman also barked when the wolves ventured too close at night, but there wasn't so easy a fix for the broken bones, dislocated joints and wounds for the party, which included Lewis' black slave, York.

These were hardy men -- and Sacajawea carried a baby on top of it, she says.

The recipes in Mansfield's book, subtitled "Historic Recipes From the Corps of Discovery & Jefferson's America," use ingredients that would have been familiar to Meriwether Lewis, William Clark and President Thomas Jefferson in 1800s America, rather than just what they ate along the trail.

Historic lure

The Lewis & Clark book is not her first foray into historic foods. Mansfield is also the author of the best-selling "Oregon Trail Cookbook." "I always loved historical cooking and anything to do with Oregon."

She discovered that the Corps of Discovery, the official name of the Lewis and Clark Expedition, didn't start out empty-handed. Mansfield lists these provisions (complete with the chronicler's colorful capitalization and spelling):

"15 bags of parched meal, 9 bags of common meal, 11 bags hulled corn, 30 half barrels of flour, 2 bags of flour, 7 bags of biscuit, 4 barrels of biscuit, 7 barrels of salt, 50 kegs of Pork, 2 boxes of candles, 1 bag of candlewick, 1 bag of coffee, 1 bag of Beens, 1 bag of pees, 2 bags of sugar, 1 keg of Hogs lard, 4 barrels of hulled corn, 1 bag of meal, 600 lbs. of Grees, 50 bushels of meal, and 24 bushels of Natchies Corn Huled."

Mansfield grew up in Oregon and now lives in Napa Valley, Calif., where she and her husband, Richard, own Mansfield Winery. She was inspired to write the Lewis and Clark book after her father sent her a clipping from the Portland-based Oregonian newspaper announcing the bicentennial.

She wended her way through the eight unabridged Lewis and Clark journals, and more than 200 books, articles and research reports, and cites her bibliography as a good reading list for history lovers.

"My husband would build a big fire, and I would read from 6 a.m. to 10 p.m.," she recalls. "It was fascinating."

The journals are in English, of course, but were "very halting reading" at first, given the creative spelling and punctuation.

When it came to food, William Clark cut to the chase: "It requires 4 deer, or an elk and a deer, or one buffalo to supply us for 24 hours."

Meriwether Lewis tended to be more poetic in his observations, Mansfield says. "You could get Lewis' train of thought. He could look at something and re-create it on the page. You could feel what he was feeling."

For example, Lewis' praise of the hard-working beavers: "The brush appear to be laid in no regular order yet acquires a strength by the irregularity with which they are placed by the beaver that it would puzzle the ingenuity of man to give them."

Sacajawea brought variety to a diet that was mostly meat. (Talk about high-protein.) "She would occasionally find some roots. ... There were wild onions and lots of wapato, a starchy tuber, which is rather like a potato when roasted," Mansfield says, then sighs. "It actually caused terrible constipation. Thank goodness Lewis had Dr. Benjamin Rush's pills.

"They were a powerful purgative -- almost pure mercury -- that the men nicknamed Rush's Thunder Pills."

But only one man died, of appendicitis, and that was at the beginning of the expedition.

A woman's role

Sacajawea was not an official member of the expedition. She was the Indian wife of Toussant Charbonneau, whom the corps had hired as a translator. (He got paid; she did not.) She was a Shoshone who was kidnapped as a girl during a raid by the Hidatsa tribe in what is now North Dakota.

"Charbonneau actually won her in a gambling game," Mansfield says. "He had another young Indian girl as a wife, but he left the other one at home."

The expedition needed horses and supplies to cross the Bitterroot Mountains along what is now Montana's western border.

"When she was acting as interpreter with a band of Shoshone, they were well into negotiations, when she realized the chief of the band was her own brother," Mansfield says. "She started crying and sobbing, he recognized her, and, of course, there was no problem anymore. They got all the horses they needed."

Sacajawea's baby was born while the expedition wintered at Fort Mandan in the Dakotas. The whole company fell in love with the baby, named Jean Baptiste. Clark, who called him "that little dancing boy," later raised the child and sent him to college.

Mansfield called Sacajawea's husband "a cad."

"He was also difficult and rather lazy, and he would strike Sacajawea, though Lewis and Clark forbade him in doing that. They humiliated him."

But he made a great French sausage.

"When they would find a young buffalo, he would make the boudin blanc," she says. "Lewis called it one of the greatest delicacies of the forest."

After the adventure westward, Clark became secretary for Indian Affairs. He married and had a family. Lewis, sadly, committed suicide.

"He may have been manic depressive," Mansfield speculates. "When you read the journals ... he was such an intense human being. Once he got back into the bureaucracy, he was so frustrated."

Sacajawea's fate is not certain. Some accounts say she died of a fever in South Dakota at the age of 25. Shoshone oral tradition says she returned to the Wind River Reservation and became an influential member of the tribe, where she lived a long life.

Tasteful omissions

Testing 1800s recipes required cooking game, which was a new experience for Mansfield. Unlike the Corps', hers was farm-raised.

Her favorite main dish -- one that some cooks would easily dismiss out of hand -- was the Buffalo Stew with Suet Dumplings.

Lewis wrote: "... to myself I assign the duty of cook. ... I collected my wood and water, boiled a large quantity of excellent dryed buffaloe meat and made each man a large suet dumpling by way of a treat."

A treat they are, says Mansfield. "Suet dumplings taste like the most delicious gnocchi -- light, tender and savory."

She included most of the historic foods. But not all. "It should be to no one's loss," she writes, "that recipes for dog and horse have been omitted here."

Lewis may have disagreed. "The dog now constitutes a considerable part of our subsistence and with most of the party has become a favorite food ...," he wrote in his journal. "I prefer it to venison or Ilk, and it is very far superior to the horse in any state."

The cookbook's historic etchings and color plates play off quotes at the bottom of the page. The handwriting doesn't belong to Lewis or Clark.

"It's actually handwritten from the handwriting of Thomas Jefferson," she says.

Mansfield created recipes that used ingredients available in 1800, though not necessarily what Corps of Discovery ate as they traveled from St. Louis, Mo., to Fort Clatsop, Ore.

"The only exceptions I made were using baking powder instead of saleratus, and powdered gelatin rather than isinglass [fish bladders] and boiled beef hooves," she says.

Good choices, those.

One of her tasters was her nephew, then 7. "Bear meat and turtle meat were his favorites."

If Mansfield had to choose a favorite recipe, it would be Maple Sugar Pie. Although it seems reminiscent of Pennsylvania Shoofly Pie, which some think is so sweet it makes your hair hurt, Mansfield says Maple Sugar Pie is not.

"It's absolutely addictive. I'm not keen on things that are so sweet, but the maple flavor cuts the sweetness. It's unbelievably good."

A president's vision

Mansfield knew of the debate over where the Lewis and Clark Expedition actually began. Local historians put it near Pittsburgh, because that's where the expedition's keelboat was built and where the supplies were collected, according to information from the Senator John Heinz Pittsburgh Regional History Center.

"But I actually think it started at the White House with the mandate from President Jefferson."

For the expedition, the president sought $2,500, which Congress granted in 1803; it ended up costing $38,722.25. "Many people were opposed to the Louisiana Purchase," Mansfield says. "But Jefferson had a vision of what the United States should be."

The writer is thrilled that her cookbook's vision is being fulfilled by the comprehensive menu put together for the Lewis and Clark dinner tomorrow night at the Pines Tavern. It quickly sold out.

It's a particularly special night for her husband because they will uncork Mansfield Winery's first vintage release from their grapes, a merlot. After Richard sold his Callahan Ridge Winery in Roseburg, Oregon's sixth largest, he moved to Napa, where he was winemaker for Staggs Leap before planting grapes for their own winery.

The couple live in a farmhouse on the place, which is so remote they have no television. Not that a TV could have taken her away from a good fire and the writings of Lewis and Clark.

It took her a year. It took a year and a half for the Corps to get to Oregon territory, a year to return home. They were homesick.

"They couldn't wait to get home," Mansfield says.

"It was one of the sweetest quotes in the book. They were coming down the Missouri, saw their first cow, and they started yelling, 'It's a cow, it's a cow!

Tomas
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March 12th, 2018, 3:17 am #30

Hello again Quills

Here more content, best of all some recipes....

In the summer of 1803, President Thomas Jefferson dispatched Captain Meriwether Lewis and William Clark to lead an expedition through the vast unchartered wildnerness of the new West.

Their 7,000 mile voyage of discovery still fascinates Americans. This year marks the 200th anniversary of the expedition, and there is a virtual avalanche of books that examine almost every aspect of the legendary trek.

One book in particular — The Lewis and Clark Cookbook — answers a curious culinary question: Just how did the explorers feed themselves during their two-year trek?

Both Lewis and Clark kept meticulous diaries, including recipes. Using those diaries and other research, author Leslie Mansfield put together the cookbook, a collection of more than 100 recipies from the era calling for historically accurate ingredients — from exotic game to prarie roots to freshwater fish.

Below, a recipe for buffalo stew with suet dumplings:

Buffalo stew:

• 2 pounds buffalo or beef stew meat, cut into 1-inch cubes
• salt and pepper to taste
• 1/4 cup all-purpose flour
• 2 tablespoons olive oil
• 1/2 cup brandy
• 2 tablespoons butter
• 1/2 cup finely chopped Smithfield ham or prosciutto
• 1 onion, finely chopped
• 2 carrots, sliced
• 2 teaspoons minced garlic
• 2 cups beef stock
• 2 cups dry red wine
• 2 tablespoons minced fresh parsley
• 1 bay leaf
• 1/2 teaspoon thyme

Suet dumplings:

• 4 ounces suet
• 1 1/2 cups all-purpose flour
• 1/2 teaspoon salt
• 1/2 cup cold water

Season the buffalo meat with salt and pepper, and lightly toss with the flour. In a large pot, heat the olive oil over medium-high heat. Add the meat and brown on all sides. Stir in the brandy, scraping up any browned bits, and simmer until almost all of the liquid has evaporated. Transfer the meat to a bowl and set aside.

Add the butter to the pot and reduce heat to medium. Add the ham and sauté until lightly browned. Add the onion and carrots and sauté until tender. Add the garlic and sauté until fragrant. Return the buffalo and any accumulated juices to the pot. Stir in the beef stock, red wine, parsley, bay leaf and thyme, and bring to a simmer. Cover the pot, reduce the heat to medium-low, and simmer for two hours or until the buffalo is very tender.

For the suet dumplings: Place the suet in a food processor and process until finely ground. Add the flour and salt, and pulse until well combined. With the processor still running, pour in the water in a thin stream. Pluse until the dough comes together in a ball. Shape the dumplings into golf-ball sized balls.

Add the dumplings to the simmering stew and turn them to coat in the sauce. Cover the pot and continue to cook an additional 25 minutes.

Serves six.

Tomas
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Brian T
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March 12th, 2018, 4:26 am #31

Smells like wine-braised bison in my kitchen.  I mix soups with the wine and never add the vegetables until that last (of 3) hour, if at all.
Depending on the boldness of the red wine, consider 1C red and at least 1C white for liquid.  Bad form to serve purple food.
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March 12th, 2018, 5:11 am #32

Tomas wrote: Hello again Quills

Here more content, best of all some recipes....

In the summer of 1803, President Thomas Jefferson dispatched Captain Meriwether Lewis and William Clark to lead an expedition through the vast unchartered wildnerness of the new West.

Their 7,000 mile voyage of discovery still fascinates Americans. This year marks the 200th anniversary of the expedition, and there is a virtual avalanche of books that examine almost every aspect of the legendary trek.

One book in particular — The Lewis and Clark Cookbook — answers a curious culinary question: Just how did the explorers feed themselves during their two-year trek?

Both Lewis and Clark kept meticulous diaries, including recipes. Using those diaries and other research, author Leslie Mansfield put together the cookbook, a collection of more than 100 recipies from the era calling for historically accurate ingredients — from exotic game to prarie roots to freshwater fish.

Below, a recipe for buffalo stew with suet dumplings:

Buffalo stew:

• 2 pounds buffalo or beef stew meat, cut into 1-inch cubes
• salt and pepper to taste
• 1/4 cup all-purpose flour
• 2 tablespoons olive oil
• 1/2 cup brandy
• 2 tablespoons butter
• 1/2 cup finely chopped Smithfield ham or prosciutto
• 1 onion, finely chopped
• 2 carrots, sliced
• 2 teaspoons minced garlic
• 2 cups beef stock
• 2 cups dry red wine
• 2 tablespoons minced fresh parsley
• 1 bay leaf
• 1/2 teaspoon thyme

Suet dumplings:

• 4 ounces suet
• 1 1/2 cups all-purpose flour
• 1/2 teaspoon salt
• 1/2 cup cold water

Season the buffalo meat with salt and pepper, and lightly toss with the flour. In a large pot, heat the olive oil over medium-high heat. Add the meat and brown on all sides. Stir in the brandy, scraping up any browned bits, and simmer until almost all of the liquid has evaporated. Transfer the meat to a bowl and set aside.

Add the butter to the pot and reduce heat to medium. Add the ham and sauté until lightly browned. Add the onion and carrots and sauté until tender. Add the garlic and sauté until fragrant. Return the buffalo and any accumulated juices to the pot. Stir in the beef stock, red wine, parsley, bay leaf and thyme, and bring to a simmer. Cover the pot, reduce the heat to medium-low, and simmer for two hours or until the buffalo is very tender.

For the suet dumplings: Place the suet in a food processor and process until finely ground. Add the flour and salt, and pulse until well combined. With the processor still running, pour in the water in a thin stream. Pluse until the dough comes together in a ball. Shape the dumplings into golf-ball sized balls.

Add the dumplings to the simmering stew and turn them to coat in the sauce. Cover the pot and continue to cook an additional 25 minutes.

Serves six.

Tomas
Interesting  post from the cookbook Tomas. Thanks for posting. Quills
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March 27th, 2018, 11:33 pm #33

Hello Folks (& Quills )

Here one thinks is the video you may have watched where reindeer people use forked interlocking poles for their skin lodge tripod the set up is about at 4:30 minutes in......









This might just be ultimate primal skin lodge pole system as the Hidatsa four pole forked lock system is considered the oldest conical tent pole system known.

It would work great for pit house roofing system.

All The Best

Tomas
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March 28th, 2018, 3:38 am #34

That the video Tomas...you found it. Quills
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April 1st, 2018, 2:00 am #35

Hello Folks

A Chipewyan rotational smoke flap, a tipi liner and an outer tipi skin cover a few inches off the ground and you have a level of fresh air ventilation that Buckminster Fuller attempted in his famous Dymaxion House using a complex mechanism.

Truly ancient ancestors had knowledge worth looking at for solutions today.

Hi Quills ... Thank for referring one to the great video.

Chipewyan Tipi

chipewyan-tipi-superior-t62686.html

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April 1st, 2018, 8:40 pm #36

I so wish I could understand what they are saying. captions in English would be nice.  So many of those Nenets videos are in Russian or their ethnic language. These folks sound more oriental. Quills
" You can't stop the waves .... but, you can learn to surf."
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