Nature.

Carving, Sculpture, Lapidary & much more.

Nature.

Forager
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Forager
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February 3rd, 2017, 11:38 pm #1

In the course of gathering raw materials or while simply during the course of other affairs, Primitive Technologists tend to see more than others.  This topic is intended as a repository of unique, special and beautiful images which strike us as significant.  Any and all are welcome to contribute as many random phenomena as they experience and happen to document by simply capturing an image.  It can be anything - the pattern of bark on a tree, a cloud formation, the swirling currents of a river flowing around obstacles; or as the seasons evolve, a bee on a wildflower or a damselfly lighting on a twig.  Captions, descriptions, or not, for pictures most often speak quite eloquently for themselves.  This is largely about our great pleasure in the awareness of the grand beauty which surrounds our lives and punctuates our efforts... the very genesis of Art being our own perceptions of beauty and it's impact.  I'll begin.

The early freeze of a tiny woodland stream this Winter capturing recently fallen leaves of Beech, Oaks and others - 


...the pioneering ridges of crystallizing ice which allow micro-thin panes of solid water to create a mosaic sheet over the accumulating debris of so many trees, some leaves crossed through their three worlds as they curl up from water through ice into air.  The multi-dimensional grades of presentation, contrasting forms and earthy tints, steadily darkening dissolution as layers of leaves descend beyond visibility.




A double-registered track of Brother Coyote in a fresh snowfall -


...hind foot print upon the preceding forefoot print with a casual scrape of snow leading in.  The sheer elegance in the simplicity of so perfectly evolved a form, the relaxed yet determined presentation of the forward-facing toe pads confirmed by the alignment of their nailprints.




Just past daybreak the sun begins to float free of the ridge and filters through the trees to illuminate the granular texture of the pond's surface, highlighting enigmatic patterns frozen within its constitution-


...brightly delineated circular forms contrasted with dark stars rising from deeper water.
Last edited by Forager on February 3rd, 2017, 11:41 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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alz
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alz
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February 5th, 2017, 9:13 am #2

It's a beautiful topic, and yes nature is art! Italy, Sicily. Etna's eruption from my house a couple of years ago.
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Michael Bootz
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February 5th, 2017, 5:28 pm #3

Great topic idea and beautiful photos!

Here's two I took recently.
Frost on last year's fallen leaves:


Frost on boxwood leaves:
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Forager
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February 5th, 2017, 11:55 pm #4

When far removed from the tension associated with a nearby eruption, your image is striking, alz.  Beyond what it may have threatened in real time and potential, this plume of our planet's inner energy presents a spectacular image for all of its layers, tints, billowing structures, dense shadows and highlighted brights.

Michael I've never seen so elaborately built a crystalline formation of frost than your image of the icy Boxwood leaves.  Observing their gravity-defying architectural fragility and knowing their susceptibility to the most slight of temperature shifts underscores your keenly opportune timing of the moment.  


Glad to see that we're underway, there can't be too many images which bring pleasure on their own terms, especially when connected with so many personal associations to time and place.  A couple more of my own favorites - 


Turkey Tail mushrooms in late Autumn -




A down feather from a Great Horned Owl -


(the coin is a convenient measure for one inch).
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Tapirchik
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February 10th, 2017, 10:07 pm #5



The dawn of winter solstice at Dolmen that is here . Unfortunately, the original landscape it's not we can see now but... it's beautiful
Last edited by Tapirchik on February 10th, 2017, 10:13 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Michael Bootz
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February 11th, 2017, 10:01 am #6

Cool photos!
I love the Turkey Tail mushrooms - easy to see where the name comes from.

Repeated frost created ice crystals on this icicle:


First snowdrops of the year:


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Forager
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February 12th, 2017, 8:26 pm #7

Great images have been posted.  

Tapirchik your photo of the Dolmen is striking for its prehistoric stature.  Megaliths are dramatic for their unmistakable signatures of our deeper past, which provide a touchstone of contact with our more distant ancestors.  My mom's parents lived in Bari before they came to America, the family professing to have lived there since Roman times... long after the construction of the Dolmen - my grandfather was a farmer and grandmother was a shepherdess.  I can only wonder how they may have described such locations and their meaning.


Michael, this is the first that I've seen of frost forming on icicles.  Impressively unique moment to have captured.
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Forager
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February 14th, 2017, 10:54 pm #8

Another volley from my corner, representing some weather events.

Bull Thistle in a field -


... I like the striking contrast between the sharply angular character of the exhausted plant against the equalizing cover of fresh snow.


Young icicles growing from lichen-ornamented shingles on an old shed -




And a fused maze of glaze ice coating a hedge -


...this was photographed on a pretty dark day but the ice gathered and concentrated the grey sky into glowing light.
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Forager
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February 15th, 2017, 4:31 am #9

One more*.
Wind-sculpted snow drifts -








*Special acknowledgement to Michael Bootz for technical guidance in uploading this particular photo - Thanks!
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Michael Bootz
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February 16th, 2017, 6:45 pm #10

Cool photos! I bet the weather that caused the glaze ice coating on that hedge wasn't very pleasant.
And I love the last one. Nature art at it's best and the angle of light is just right to highlight the ripples in the snow.
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alz
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February 16th, 2017, 7:58 pm #11

Beautiful pictures! Took this last summer up on my land
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Forager
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February 16th, 2017, 10:30 pm #12

Great, alz - I have been hoping to see some insects on plants. Their contrasts in beauty, intricacy, color, form, and more, make for fascinating natural compositions.
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alz
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February 17th, 2017, 11:27 am #13

Forager: It's just a photo I took with my phone but glad you liked it. Another shot of my volcano with a strange cloud. It can be quite a show.
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Michael Bootz
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February 17th, 2017, 10:29 pm #14

Wow, that's great!  Looks almost like a flying saucer hovering over the volcano 

I love the intricate details of insect eyes.
Dragonfly:


Grasshopper:


Hoverfly:


Bee:
Last edited by Michael Bootz on February 18th, 2017, 12:20 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Forager
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February 17th, 2017, 11:15 pm #15

alz, the image of the unique Lenticular Clouds over your volcano was a distinguished treat.


Michael your perception of the minute is exceptional.  Your images are astonishing for what they tell us of the structure of smaller lives. 
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Forager
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February 18th, 2017, 2:20 am #16

Still mesmerized by the insect ocular portraits. Can scarcely imagine sight from so many composite cells through a forest of hairs. Now I understand why they run a foreleg over an eye - to remove the accumulation of pollen and micro-debris for a clear view... a simple, unblinking surrogate for an eyelid.
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Michael Bootz
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February 18th, 2017, 12:20 pm #17

Yes, seeing the world through an insect's eyes would be truly fascinating. Hard to imagine what it would look like with hundreds of lenses instead of just one per eye.
Here are two photos of hoverflies cleaning their eyes with their forelegs:


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Tapirchik
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February 18th, 2017, 3:43 pm #18

Amazing photos!!! Mike did you used a macro objective? Short exposure time?
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Michael Bootz
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February 18th, 2017, 6:51 pm #19

Tapirchik wrote:
Amazing photos!!! Mike did you used a macro objective? Short exposure time?
Thanks! Yes, I used a macro lens.Exposure time wasn't all that short (I mostly use 1/200 s) but I used a flash for these which helps to freeze motion by lowering effective exposure time.
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Forager
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February 19th, 2017, 1:16 am #20

Thanks for the specific shots of the hoverflies. The fine detail you've captured shows a measure of complementary design in the ability of the foreleg guard hairs to 'comb' their uniquely placed eyelashes.

Sometimes all that's required for a greater vision of the beauty and intricacy in our world is a clear photo.
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