more with local black walnut

Discussion about all forms of old-time woodworking, and woodworking tools. Hand tools, people powered machines, and so on.

more with local black walnut

forginhill
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forginhill
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Joined: July 5th, 2006, 1:07 pm

November 26th, 2017, 2:09 pm #1

I recently found a local source of black walnut, which got me pretty excited. I brought home some sections of a log that had lain for a long time. The bark was mostly rotted off. Some outer parts are a little punky, but there is plenty of useable wood.




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Robson Valley
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Robson Valley
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Joined: April 24th, 2015, 12:27 am

November 26th, 2017, 10:55 pm #2

Nice how you never run out of ideas for handle patterns.
I do like how you have smooth upper sides and then textured backs.

Very subtle patterns in textures on lots of the Pacific Northwest native carvings.
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Michael Bootz
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Michael Bootz
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Joined: September 21st, 2007, 4:23 pm

November 27th, 2017, 5:05 pm #3

+1, I love your handle designs. Walnut sure is a pretty wood.
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Quillsnkiko
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Quillsnkiko
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Joined: June 22nd, 2006, 8:25 am

December 8th, 2017, 3:52 am #4

Love the wooden spoons...I wonder if the wood imparts any taste to foods? They are really pretty.Love the designs on the handles and the rougher carved look. 
Quills
" You can't stop the waves .... but, you can learn to surf."
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Robson Valley
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Robson Valley
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Joined: April 24th, 2015, 12:27 am

December 8th, 2017, 4:23 am #5

I've carved both spoons and forks in a variety of woods.  I have used spruce, pine, western red cedar, yellow cedar and lots of birch.  None impart any flavor at all to foods.If  anything, I might notice the oven baked oil finish but that's it.
I have not found good enough pieces of any fruit wood (apple, pear, etc) to carve for comparison.

I was taught to take the spoons/forks out of the pot as there are other things more deserving of being cooked.

The textured back surface of forginhill's spoons is a common decorative technique in the PacNW.
Like you, Quill, I like that appearance very much.  A lot of what you might see in collections like the UBC/MOA is done with great precision and regularity.  Possibly a heritage tradition?
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