paleoarts
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paleoarts
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April 3rd, 2013, 12:46 am #161

sometimes i make stuff just for fun and not for sale. this is definitely one of those


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aztec
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April 3rd, 2013, 12:57 am #162

thats mean looking!
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LukeWebb
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April 3rd, 2013, 2:31 am #163

OW! I have been wanting to make something very similar, been setting aside flakes that I could set in a maquahuitl like that that rather than struck blades. Great work!
 See my work and friend me on Facebook!  https://www.facebook.com/luke.webb.56808
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KuKulzA28
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May 5th, 2013, 12:53 am #164

I made an Aputu. 

It is a style of club used by the Carib, Arawak, Warao, Akawaio, Makushi, and other Caribbean/Guianan indians
Aputu / apootoo / boutou is the Carib word for it... Carib is a very general term though


these are very hefty bludgeons, for close quarters, and the sharp rectangular edges can definitely hurt. 
The rectangular grip is not particularly comfortable, but it won't easily roll in the hand and it's hard to lose because of the flare at the butt


This is but one style of club once used in those parts. They also used the equivalent of bats, wooden swords, two-handed swords, and sharp-edged paddle-like clubs. 








some originals:
http://anthro.amnh.org/anthropology/dat ... %2F%204976
http://anthro.amnh.org/anthropology/dat ... %2F%205937
http://anthro.amnh.org/anthropology/dat ... %2F%203568
http://anthro.amnh.org/anthropology/dat ... %2F%206339


and a good reading on it "The Aputu: An Examination and Analysis of a War Club-Form Distinctive to the Guianas"
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aztec
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May 5th, 2013, 1:46 am #165

awesome work! i like it!
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KuKulzA28
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May 5th, 2013, 2:21 am #166

Thanks aztec. Seeing your work, the compliment means a lot It didn't come out as good as the finest of the originals.. but I mean, they were made by the experts

Someday....


anyways, next project is a Yanomami warclub... which is kind of a bladed staff with sharp ends... functionally just like a Maori taiaha
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aztec
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May 5th, 2013, 3:10 am #167

anytime! thanks for compliments as well. i like seeing different things, im fascinated by all types of war clubs from around the world
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paleoarts
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May 8th, 2013, 1:23 pm #168

nice! is that cocobolo?
check out my online gallery, including shopping cart, at www.flintknappers.com/gallery/paleoarts and follow me on Facebook.
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KuKulzA28
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May 9th, 2013, 3:14 am #169

paleoarts wrote:
nice! is that cocobolo?
Yup, it's cocobolo. Tough stuff.Going to make another one someday out of another wood. Maybe a Brazilian wood... But first I want to carve a few other types of clubs before I come back to aputu
my only unhappiness is that you don't know which ones were legally and sustainably extracted, and which ones (probably majority) were illegal or unsustainably logged...
I'm pretty new to woodcarving, and I use a machete, hammer, chisel, saw, small plane, sandpaper, and file/rasp [so no power tools here] - so it's enjoyable but the going is slow
...not as slow as bone, wood, and stone tools though... 
Last edited by KuKulzA28 on May 9th, 2013, 3:21 am, edited 3 times in total.
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LukeWebb
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May 9th, 2013, 6:13 am #170

Nice work. Try to find a good drawknife, it will come in really handy, also a hatchet and adze and some gouges and a crooked knife. You would be surprised though, a lot of stone tools aren't actually that time consuming, especially knapped ones, it depends a lot on the material and what shape it is in to start, with making something like a grooved stone club for example it only takes about an hour to peck a decent groove in a semi hard stone, maybe an hour and a half for a lot of granite, but if you grind it into an axe that takes a few more hours. Way back when though I would expect it was much easier to shape stone tools than it was for them to shape wood.
 See my work and friend me on Facebook!  https://www.facebook.com/luke.webb.56808
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KuKulzA28
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May 9th, 2013, 12:56 pm #171

thanks for the tips.... I've been using the machete as a draw knife, and it's OK... but not ideal

yea that's what I meant, that USING stone or bone vs steel to carve wood is more time consuming, tho the end result not inferior...
after-all, most of the fine Amerindian and Pacific Islander warclubs were made without steel tools...
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aztec
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May 24th, 2013, 5:47 pm #172

i didn't have many blades left and Ive been wanting to do a smaller maquahuitl for awhile now.. so after finding a scrap piece of Australian cypress i got inspired!

its a mix of smokey obsidian and black obsidian with a thin braided yucca wrist strap


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paleoarts
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May 25th, 2013, 3:22 am #173

sweet collection! well done, Caleb!
check out my online gallery, including shopping cart, at www.flintknappers.com/gallery/paleoarts and follow me on Facebook.
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aztec
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May 25th, 2013, 4:02 am #174

thanks! you helped a lot with that gear
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paleoarts
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August 26th, 2013, 3:34 pm #175

Ironbark with twisted deer hide lace wrist thong.


Last edited by paleoarts on August 27th, 2013, 9:15 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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aztec
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August 26th, 2013, 5:02 pm #176

woah dude! nice. i like that one a lot
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paleoarts
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August 26th, 2013, 11:38 pm #177

thanks, man
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KuKulzA28
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September 29th, 2013, 2:37 pm #178

Thanks for the comment. Yes the Arawak/lokono people had bigger clubs as well, as did their neighbors. Many used long thinner almost sword shaped clubs, and others used wider paddle shaped clubs - both able to give nasty cuts and snap smaller bones... where as the smaller block warclub and the short dagger-like clubs were very close-in weapons. As for the block-shaped club, it's not just the Arawaks that made them, infact the "Caribs" and other groups in the Guiana Shield region also used this club a lot. Here's a sampling of various Guiana and Amazonian clubs: http://www.vikingsword.com/vb/showpost. ... stcount=57 lot's of aputu and sapakana from the Guiana region here

Impoliteness was never my intention, so if it resembling an Arawakan/Taino weapon seems impolite, call it a Carib war club. After-all they both used this sort of club, it's not like one group exclusively used them or had a "patent" :P
Last edited by KuKulzA28 on September 29th, 2013, 2:41 pm, edited 2 times in total.
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paleoarts
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September 29th, 2013, 4:14 pm #179

"Also for my tribe its very unpolite to make our weapons if you are not part of the tribe."

I'm sorry, but I must take issue with that statement. Not to be combative, but by your logic it would be rude for anyone who wasn't English to make an English long bow, or for someone to craft a thrusting spear who wasn't a Neanderthal. I have always been of the opinion that imitation is the sincerest form of flattery and also, that if go back far enough, that the tools, weapons, and skills represented here on Paleoplanet are everyones heritage no matter what your current cultural, ethnic, or national affiliation is.

Chris
Last edited by paleoarts on September 29th, 2013, 4:16 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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LukeWebb
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October 3rd, 2013, 10:53 pm #180

KuKulza....wow...that is one heck of a gorgeous collection! I love the clubs and warpaddles, I also really love that ball headed club in your fireplace and the stone axes.
 See my work and friend me on Facebook!  https://www.facebook.com/luke.webb.56808
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