making a paleo-copper pressureflaker

A collection of information for those just starting their flintknapping journey.

making a paleo-copper pressureflaker

stonefacescar
Registered User
Joined: 18 Apr 2004, 21:27

02 Sep 2007, 00:17 #1

Ok.. here's the first cut, to define the length of the tool...this saw will make a clean cut to the left , and a rough cut to the right, depending on which side of the saw you use... the smooth side of the cut is made by the ventral side of the blade ( that's why you don't chip it bifacely,, to keep a smooth bearing side, and to keep all the "teeth" in alignment, to keep a straight cut,!)



then I start a shearing cut at an angle into the first cut,, it's just a small cut, then you turn the piece and make another, and so on, till you get all the way around to the first cut..



then make another saw cut around the piece at the bottom of the first one, and continue this process..



till you can cleanly break off the piece,, the tapered shape is the nose of the tool,, and the squared end is the butt of the tool,, you can work your way down a long pole cutting lengths as you go that have one pointy end and one flat end...



next, I cut the cross grooves for the hinge pin, which also serves the purpose of keeping the two halves from sliding apart....I also marked the channel that is to be cut for the copper core....




hinge pin fits,!..and shows how the clearence cut at the end will allow the halves to open



here is the rounded scraping tool I used to scrape out the channel to depth...



then cut the sides to follow the line with the saw..



then scraped the corners with the squared scraping tool.. other end of the round tool...



I'm starting the second slot for the copper "foot" that keeps it in place and keeps it from slipping back when pressure is applied...I had to sharpen the drill a couple times, because I accidently tilted it in the hole while drilling and snapped the tip some.. you have to be really carefull... it's a b*^$h getting that tiny piece of stone out of the hole so you can contuinue drilling,!!!



only two more holes to drill...this drill is being spun by hand (fingers) with applied force from the face of my copper percussion tool.....



done..



I'll start by slicing the side of the slot between the two holes...do that to both sides...



and then dig out between the slices..





then I drive the end of the copper flat bar into the hole I just made to give it a good "seat"...



then bent the end of the copper at a 90 angle to form the "leg"..



here it is in place...



this is the first wrap... after you get done lashing the hinge pin in place, leave a long "bitter-end" to use as the first tie-down... this will begin to grip at the base and work forward on the copper, and greatly help to hold the tool 'still'....



then a strip of leather is wrapped tightly around that, and tied-off..usually just weaved under the preceeding loop of the strip, and pulled tightly....



here's the tip of my flaking tool, showing the angle I try to always maintain, to work within the softer collapse zone of the sharpened copper tip... as soon as it starts to nick and dull up, it will start to crush the stone instead of gripping into the sharp platforms that I use....





you've probably seen this saw before, but here it is again,, this is an edge view, showing the even plane that the teeth ride in,,... and I'm just showing off at how straight a flake I can drive off a core,!



ventral (bottom) side...keep it clean.. no flakes driven off toward this side,!!!!!.. those at the tip are to take away the bulb-of-percussion



and the dorsal (top) side of the flake.... this flake is sitting in a "step", and not a groove.. the step allows the flake to be bound in tightly without any glue,, the squared bottom of the step keeps the saw from shifting from side to side..



well, that's all for now..hope this is a help to you that want to use paleo tools

Charlie Brumbaugh II
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onemississipp
Registered User
Joined: 08 Aug 2006, 01:09

19 Sep 2007, 02:54 #2

That was great!!

knapping tools to make tools to knap..

Thanks you sharingDustin
Dustin
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Snowalker
Registered User
Joined: 28 Nov 2006, 22:42

21 Sep 2007, 02:25 #3

That rocks!!!
1*
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PaleoAleo
Registered User
Joined: 14 Apr 2003, 21:09

27 Sep 2007, 01:31 #4

What an excellent tutorial Charlie! If it's not already there, I'd like to put a copy in the Knapping Reference area too (with your permission).

Excellent! Thank you for doing this for us.

Tom
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stonefacescar
Registered User
Joined: 18 Apr 2004, 21:27

28 Sep 2007, 09:12 #5

...Go for it bro,!... I'm honored...........thanks..


Charlie
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Aboknapper
Registered User
Joined: 13 Aug 2005, 06:53

28 Feb 2009, 16:01 #6

Ancient pressure flaker handles are in the archeological record, Otzi the iceman had one made of lime tree, he had a antler insert though, so the same variation can be be made for abo if you cut your antler down the middle.. A fancy contemporary variation of the one I use for finishing was make by a knapper friend of mine named Kenbob, it was originally made for copper and given to try to convert me LOL... I bored out the hole and it works great.. Who say's abo is expensive




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jrweird
Registered User
Joined: 03 Nov 2008, 13:55

28 Feb 2009, 16:44 #7

Aboknapper What are the billets on the right made of?
Thanks Jeff
 

     Jeff

Don't Panic 
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Aboknapper
Registered User
Joined: 13 Aug 2005, 06:53

28 Feb 2009, 17:06 #8

Dog wood, and I think they greatly reduce shock wave associated with endsnap, twobear can get them for you, his partner Tom handed me one to try and it was love at first site.. I love them and they are a permanant addition. In case anyone else is wondering the jaw bone is deer and used for notcing, the hand anvil is made from bison rib and i wrap leather to create channels to drive flakes through.. I have a new moose billet and axis billet, the leather for palm flaking is stiff braintan I believe it moves the flake better that soft tan leather and stronger too... Another cost cutting hint is to make your hand pad leather out of doggie chewies,, Just soak them and apply the brains or even egg tan them...
Last edited by Aboknapper on 28 Feb 2009, 17:21, edited 4 times in total.
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jrweird
Registered User
Joined: 03 Nov 2008, 13:55

28 Feb 2009, 21:51 #9

Thanks Aboknapper, I have a moose antler billet and tried useing an old hammer handle ground down its ok for obsidian, i seem to have better results with copper right now.
 

     Jeff

Don't Panic 
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jcinpc
Registered User
Joined: 03 Apr 2007, 09:20

20 Nov 2009, 04:38 #10

AWESOME POST, very detailed and informative. I like the thinking. I have an ancient flaker to post but is more woodland period than paleo,lol. I found this diving years back. I had thought it was for percussion then my buddy down the road Claude looked at it and said its a pressure flaker, used between the legs, its an antler piece and I found it in front of a site that I got alot of antler handles and pins from.You have to love the way these people thought and what they produced, for me its way more than a stone projectile.


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megalithics
Registered User
Joined: 08 Jun 2009, 00:48

25 Nov 2009, 03:06 #11

I posted this picture in the beginner's area but thought it would go well here too.









This is a picture of the Hacker flaker from the Hacker mound group along the Illinois River accross from the town of Hardin, IL. It was found in a small Middle Woodland (about 0-AD) mound on the bluff crest. It's the top tool in the photo. It was found with part of its antler handle still intact. When it was stored in the museum, the handle cracked apart revealing a small "nail-type" head on the proximal end. I was there when this flaker was found. I hadn't started knapping at this time but knew what it was immediately.
The tool at the bottom of the photo is a copper notcher found at a mound group 20 or 30 miles to the North of Hacker. It was found in the corner of the central chamber and was thought to have been swept into the corner when the chamber was cleaned out for another burial. Notice its "nail-type" end.
This next photo is of a flaker with a "nail-type" head found by Greg Perino, at the famous Snyder site located about 10 miles South of Hacker. It has a possible rejected or used flaker on top.



Here's the Hacker flaker in-situ






The occurance of these three "nail-types" within a 50 mile area is quite interesting especially when I haven't heard of any others in the archaeological record. Larry PS I upgraded to better photos on Thanksgiving day.
Last edited by megalithics on 26 Nov 2009, 16:49, edited 3 times in total.
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FlintknapperJimmy
Registered User
Joined: 19 Sep 2008, 00:30

11 Aug 2010, 23:24 #12

I've been reading about the "old copper culture" of the archaic period. They've been making these things for a long, long time... Great work on this. Seems like there's a lot more than meets the eye when it comes to flint knapping in North America.
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sticks65
Registered User
Joined: 28 Aug 2010, 00:54

28 Aug 2010, 00:54 #13

Great tutorial,thanks
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hardr004
Registered User
Joined: 08 Nov 2010, 20:44

08 Nov 2010, 20:44 #14

What does it actually do?
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finaltom5
Registered User
Joined: 20 Nov 2010, 22:47

20 Nov 2010, 22:47 #15

I see all these tols made out of copper. Where is a good place to get copper nails?  Or do i have to forge my own out of copper pipe or other items made out of copper?  Any suggestions would be great 
Great tutorial.
TY

Finaltom 
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megalithics
Registered User
Joined: 08 Jun 2009, 00:48

07 Dec 2010, 23:25 #16

Try your local recycling center. Larry
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Tyrannocaster
Registered User
Joined: 12 Oct 2015, 16:21

30 Nov 2015, 20:42 #17

I know this an old thread, but it's really cool! One thing wasn't explained that everybody else seems to already know but me: how did he split the piece of wood. One photo it's a round stick and in the next photo it' in two pieces. Was this cut or split? Every time I split wood the results are...not that clean.
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