Long Term Wooden Handled Flaker

boletus
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boletus
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Joined: July 22nd, 2016, 6:15 pm

October 18th, 2016, 11:42 pm #1

I like to make my own tools and I prefer to have a wooden handle. It just feels better in the hand. I wanted to make a wooden handled pressure flaker that would last for a very long time. Im sure something similiar or even exactly like this has been before, but hey, we like this stuff here

*Aquire a dry, hardwood branch that feels good to your hand and has a nice straight section with the length that you like. This one was made from oak. Branches are a lot stronger then dowels, its a little more work but I think the tool will last a lot longer and it looks better too.



*Get a copper cap and dome it. I think this one was 7/8" (Harbor Freight, doming punch is about $30 or so, and you can use it to make your boppers too..)


*Drill a hole in the center of the cap and on the side as well


*Carve/file your stick to shape to your hand and to accomodate the cap on the end. When it fits well, mark the location of the holes on your wood and drill them out for your copper rod and where your set screw will be.


*We're going to be fitting a steel nut into the area where the set screw will be. Center the nut over the hole and trace around it. Carefully carve out the socket.. we dont want it to start spinning in there, so its best to have it fit just right. Don't get lazy and drill a round hole..we are going for longevity here.


*Looking pretty good here.. Check the nut for a good fit, slide your copper rod down the flaker, put in the set screw and make sure it tightens down on the copper rod firmly without leaving the nut behind. I had to do this a few times to make sure I carved the socket out deep enough.


*Rough up all sides of the nut that make contact in the socket with a file. This should help it stay secured a little better. Epoxy the nut in the socket. Be carefully not to get any on the threads. A qtip should work if you booboo here, just be quick about it. I let the nut cure in the socket overnight before finishing.


* Screw in your set screw, rough up inside the copper cap real good with some sandpaper and epoxy that bad boy on there. Make sure it lines up well and let it cure real good. Again..watch that glue getting into your threads/set screw. Im thinking this should last many many years (at least I hope).





Thanks for looking!
Last edited by boletus on October 18th, 2016, 11:46 pm, edited 1 time in total.
-Jason
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ndoghouse
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ndoghouse
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Joined: August 17th, 2015, 8:16 pm

October 19th, 2016, 12:14 am #2

I like the captured nut and set screw idea. Great looking flaker. Keep it oiled with mineral oil or boiled linseed oil to prevent it from cracking later on. It will make the grain pop too! that should work well with antler as well. Very nice!
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missalot
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missalot
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Joined: October 18th, 2009, 12:12 am

October 19th, 2016, 1:37 am #3

Boletus I am in your camp but much lazier. I use broom handle or dowels with a copper cap, I hadn't thought about the nut under the cap that is a cool idea.

Kevin
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Chippintuff
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Chippintuff
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Joined: January 21st, 2011, 12:25 am

October 19th, 2016, 4:34 am #4

That looks like a good design.

WA
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boletus
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boletus
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Joined: July 22nd, 2016, 6:15 pm

October 19th, 2016, 4:46 am #5

ndoghouse wrote:
I like the captured nut and set screw idea. Great looking flaker. Keep it oiled with mineral oil or boiled linseed oil to prevent it from cracking later on. It will make the grain pop too! that should work well with antler as well. Very nice!
I actually have some linseed on hand for making my ochre paints, thanks for the suggestion. One made with antler would be sweet, carving out the socket may be a pita though.
-Jason
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nogie1717
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nogie1717
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Joined: April 6th, 2016, 2:43 pm

October 19th, 2016, 1:27 pm #6

Very nice flaker, boletus. Looks like it will hold up well and last a long time.
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