Little container

Tapirchik
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Tapirchik
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Joined: March 22nd, 2013, 4:31 pm

September 5th, 2018, 7:42 pm #1

Hello everyone, I made this small container to melt lead. Too bad I do not have a potter's wheel. In the early 2000s, I found that the bone polished wood but not only. Rubbing the surface with a bone, when it is not completely dry, produces an almost vitreous surface. On homogeneous and smooth surfaces, a nice effect can be achieved. I did this without particular care, so the surface is not smooth but has so many depressions and protrusions. Hope you'll like, best regards, Ruggiero
https://youtu.be/C1p6LGrloTI
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Tapirchik
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Tapirchik
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Joined: March 22nd, 2013, 4:31 pm

September 5th, 2018, 7:56 pm #2

In the video, the piece is dry, I have not fired it yet
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Bill Skinner
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Bill Skinner
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Joined: May 1st, 2011, 3:00 am

September 14th, 2018, 1:51 pm #3

Ceramic?  What kind of clay?

If you take s flat piece of fine sandstone and smooth the surface before burnishing, the dips will disappear.  The whole surface can then be burnished.  You can also use a smooth rock to get the same finish.
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Tapirchik
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Tapirchik
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Joined: March 22nd, 2013, 4:31 pm

September 14th, 2018, 2:07 pm #4

Thanks Bill, I did not thought about sandstone to smooth the surface. The clay I've collected it on a beach, nearly a river. I use bone because the clay polishes the bone

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Bill Skinner
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Bill Skinner
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Joined: May 1st, 2011, 3:00 am

September 15th, 2018, 12:35 am #5

I've known people to scrape the surface to smooth it out, that is probably one of the ways the southeastern Native Americans got some rather marginal clay rather thin.  And some would then burnish the pot and some wouldn't

The local clays have lots of microscopic organics, they are rather porus when fired, burnishing the pots help keep the liquids from seeping out from the sides.  And it looks really neat when you draw a design on the burnished pot and then blacken it after firing.
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