Johnstone/Slab Knapping Tutorial

A collection of information for those just starting their flintknapping journey.
PaleoAleo
Registered User
Joined: 14 Apr 2003, 21:09

14 Jan 2010, 03:13 #41

Luke, here's a real easy way to make an Ishi stick flaker (or just a regular, short handled pressure flaker). I've made a few of these using the same idea, but instead of copper, I used deer antler and occassionaly bone for the insert piece.

Basically cut half-way through a dowel shaped piece of wood and then split it from the end. Then hollow the pieces a little bit so that when put together all is snug. Then wrap with a soft/stretchy piece of leather. When you need to move the copper out some, just add in a little spacer (see the small wood dowel?):



Here it is put together:


Here's one made using the same idea, but with deer antler:


My old friend Charlie (Stonefacescar) taught me how to make these. Haven't seen him in ages. He's a great guy and quite inventive!

Tom
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stevet
Registered User
Joined: 15 Feb 2010, 03:29

18 Apr 2010, 15:56 #42

But I did salvage this out of the old toilet.... Thanks for the tutorial paleoaleo..Steve
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JasonB
Registered User
Joined: 17 May 2010, 02:00

17 May 2010, 02:00 #43

That is just awesome- having johnstone as a resource makes it easier on me as not MUCH usable rock round here without ordering it - and seeing as how i am still learning a bad strike wont hurt SOOOOOOOOOOO bad!

Thanks

J
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vicente
Registered User
Joined: 18 Jun 2010, 06:18

18 Jun 2010, 07:28 #44

Yo Tom,
what is the different  between the triangle and the round points of the ishi points
when use each?
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stoneshaper
Registered User
Joined: 26 Aug 2010, 14:28

09 Nov 2010, 19:24 #45

Here is a Graham Cave replica that I made out of Johnstone.  I don't like working it but I do from time to time just to keep my skills up for working problem pieces of raw chert.  What I have found works best with johnstone is lots of heavy abrading and using a heavy antler billet with light but firm contact to the striking platform.  By doing this I can drive off large thinning flakes and virtually elimenate hinge and step fractures.  The tutorial was excelent, and gave me the opportunity to revisit working with johnstone, and by combinding what I knew with what I learned from the tutorial I was able to produce the replica below.  It is a bit over 4 inches long, and 3/16 in thick with no major step or hinge fractures, and very, very few minor ones from the final edge preperation with the pressure flaker.  Sorry I am not a photographer, the second pic is better than the first.




Best wishes,

Joe
"Safe? No you aren't safe.  There are a billion other things out there ready to burn your whole world, but if you want to think you are safe just so you can sleep at night, then you're safe, but not really."- The Doctor
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Emrys69
Registered User
Joined: 27 Oct 2010, 03:11

18 Nov 2010, 04:05 #46

That's just awsome!!! One of the best tutorials I've read!!! This Paleoplanet IS THE BEST forum around!! I spend hours and hours on here the learning never stops!!
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Pavlos
Registered User
Joined: 28 Nov 2010, 10:00

28 Nov 2010, 10:00 #47

Great job Tom. Many thanks!!!
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jamieleff
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Joined: 03 Jan 2011, 23:36

24 Mar 2011, 09:58 #48

hey tom this is excellent. would you mind me putting this up on the p.a. board for others to see? peace, jamie
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booksandbangs
Registered User
Joined: 12 May 2011, 13:11

13 May 2011, 00:29 #49

Thanks for the tutorial maby now I can get that old stuf to knap.
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Foxfire
Registered User
Joined: 15 Oct 2011, 19:52

14 Apr 2012, 02:18 #50

Been looking at how to make some of me own stone scrapers for scraping a deer hide. This thread is so full of awesomeness. Thanks for the tutorial, links, tips and advice

Now to find me an old unused toilet bowl .... I'm sure I saw one somewhere in the neighbourhood. Might need to wash and disinfect it first tho!
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Ma Tanner
Registered User
Joined: 30 Nov 2012, 02:23

25 Feb 2013, 19:05 #51

Good points. I tried this but I find it hard to get a flake. When I do it is steep and it stalls out and then I can't get it to flake again. Am I doing something wrong? I was using a steel capped bopper, cuz I have no copper. I tried antler as well, and a hammerstone. Is there a way to treat it so it's not so hard?

Ma
I have opinions of my own --strong opinions-- but I don't always agree with them. G. W. Bush                             ~~LOL~~
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indianafarmboy
Registered User
Joined: 04 Sep 2011, 16:27

25 Feb 2013, 21:08 #52

Soaking it in water will help, or so some say. I've never tried soaking it in water. You will need to make sure you are below center line by setting up every platform with a pressure flaker. Be sure to abrade really good and hit it like you mean it!!! Show the John Stone who is boss That really is all the advice I can give, but others may chime in with more/better ideas. Crap Rock as I call it really isn't the best to learn with, but once you have it mastered you can pretty much knapp anything. I like to work a piece every now and then just to keep myself on my toes Good luck and remember to abrade.
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Ma Tanner
Registered User
Joined: 30 Nov 2012, 02:23

26 Feb 2013, 16:41 #53

Thanks indianafarmboy, I wonder how long to soak in water. I also wonder if all the parts of the johnstone donator are the same in hardness. What I was working on came from the flat parts on the bottom where it meets the floor. (Didn't have a tank that was already broken, so my husband wouldn't let me have an unbroken one, just to smash up. We have some out in the field. :P ) Maybe a tank would not be quite so tuff? Probly doesn't make a difference, but it was an idea. I have some tv glass, I need to learn more with that, probly before I go to something else.
Thanks
Ma
I have opinions of my own --strong opinions-- but I don't always agree with them. G. W. Bush                             ~~LOL~~
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indianafarmboy
Registered User
Joined: 04 Sep 2011, 16:27

26 Feb 2013, 20:03 #54

Yeah, I would learn and get good with glass first, then destroy the tough stuff for more practice.
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Bullethead
Registered User
Joined: 26 Jul 2011, 06:02

26 Feb 2013, 21:44 #55

With chert, you need to soak the rock about 6 months to get much benefit.  Maybe Johnstone, being more porous, would take less time.

NOTE:  if you soak your material, you'll need something to kill mosquitos and also be aware that all sorts of nasties grow in you stagnant rock bucket.  I recently had a case of giardia which I suspect was from nasty water on a well-soaked rock.  Pull rock out of bucket and knap it, then wipe sweat from face.
[font]-Bullethead
[/font]Where I live, you're as likely to see a rock of any sort (let alone knappable) lying there for the taking as you are to see Elvis and Bigfoot making out in the backseat of a UFO .
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Ma Tanner
Registered User
Joined: 30 Nov 2012, 02:23

27 Feb 2013, 06:22 #56

Bullethead, that sounds awful. I'd be more inclined get a potato bag or an orange bag full of rocks, and tie them to a tree at the river.

Thanks for the info guys.

Ma
I have opinions of my own --strong opinions-- but I don't always agree with them. G. W. Bush                             ~~LOL~~
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AncientArcher76
Registered User
Joined: 06 Mar 2010, 21:43

28 Nov 2013, 07:27 #57

Great thread Tom, you cant discredit toilet chert... It's a great resource to utilize and kinda resembles grainy novaculite. Great point too!


Russ
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hoagyfire
Registered User
Joined: 08 Sep 2014, 19:49

06 Mar 2015, 11:28 #58

I hate working crapperstone but when a point turns out like this it makes me want to try again... I just found this pic on Google and thought it was genuine.. Nice!
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