Intact Ancient Atlatl Dart and Ground point found in Yukon

Prairie Man
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Prairie Man
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Joined: March 15th, 2004, 2:44 pm

September 5th, 2018, 8:24 pm #1

A couple important recent finds in the Yukon   https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/north/yu ... -1.4809947
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azmdted
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azmdted
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September 5th, 2018, 9:54 pm #2

Very cool. Thanks. 
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Tomas
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Tomas
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September 5th, 2018, 9:56 pm #3

Hello Prarie Man

Great article... here is an item about the reconstruction of darts and atlatls from that same vicinity.

http://elfshotgallery.blogspot.com/2015 ... n.html?m=1

Cheers

Tomas
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Brian T
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Brian T
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September 5th, 2018, 11:54 pm #4

Great articles.
Wing primaries on Greater Canada Geese are in the order of 30+ cm in length.

I'd like to learn more about the preparation of the wooden shaft replicas.
Even with my modern draw knife and spoke shaves, shafts like those are an enormous amount of careful work.
Buggy spokes are easy when compared with those.
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WIoutdoorguy
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WIoutdoorguy
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September 6th, 2018, 1:33 pm #5

Thanks for posting the link Prairie man. I'm glad the article had pics too.
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Tomas
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Tomas
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September 7th, 2018, 2:54 am #6

Hello Folks

Here is copy from a ‘survival ‘ site on making Atlatl darts... there is a link to the rest of the article...
Tomas

How to Make an Atlatl Dart

The dart is the projectile that the atlatl propels.�Think of it as a large arrow, with a large point on the front and fletching (also optional) on the back.

Darts can be made out any sticks or branches, but I’ve found the best survival darts are made out of river cane. Bamboo also works well.

Select a straight piece of river cane about a half inch in diameter and 4-5�feet long. Choosing a straight piece ensures it flies in a straight line. If you have chosen a slightly bent river cane, you can apply heat and bend it into place.

Next, you’ll need to make the foreshaft. The foreshaft is a smaller, secondary shaft that you insert into the tip of the mainshaft.�This will provide additional strength when it hits the target. Push the foreshaft into the river cane until it hits a joint, and leave about a foot of foreshaft sticking out of the cane. Tie it into place with any plant fibers you can find.

Use your knife to sharpen the foreshaft into a point. Your dart is now useable, although with a few simple modifications, you can greatly increase the usability of the dart.



Alternative Dart Improvements

Much like making a fire without smoke, small modifications to your dart can make all the difference.

Tips: You don’t�necessarily have to fashion the foreshaft into a point. Use whatever you have at your disposal – a tent spike, an arrowhead, or a piece of glass.

Fishing: If you attach several points to the end, the atlatl dart makes an excellent fishing spear.�Instead of trying to pin a fish with a single pointed end, you have several. This provides a larger surface area,�increasing the chances of a successful throw.

Strength: If an atlatl dart is going to break, it is either going to break at the tip, or at the mainshaft joint (where the the foreshaft was inserted).�To increase the strength of the joint, wrap sinew or other plant fibers tightly around the joint.

Accuracy: To increase the accuracy of the dart, you can add feathers the end.�On an arrow, this is the called the fletching. It works the same way for the atlatl dart.

http://justsurvival.com/how-to-make-an-atlatl
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Brian T
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Brian T
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September 7th, 2018, 4:53 pm #7

River cane and bamboo are never a part of any plant community in Taiga aka Boreal Forest, despite the many different biogeoclimatic zones.
Therefore, we are limited to a choice among the woody species on this biome.

With paleo tools and my understanding of wood anatomy, I'd select Alder for all of the parts.
It really carves well wet, if kept wet.  Dried, it turns from cheese to bone.  Moreso than birch.
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