Hoping someone can help......

DavidMcAliley
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DavidMcAliley
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Joined: 1:00 AM - Nov 10, 2011

4:37 AM - Jan 24, 2015 #1

Okay...  I wanted to see if some of the more experienced eyes out there could shed some light on this field find from a farm (talk about a tongue twister...).  I am not sure what era this would have come from.... It was found in central piedmont of NC, in the Cape Fear River basin....  Any help would be greatly appreciated.



























Thanks again.




Dave.
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Quillsnkiko
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Quillsnkiko
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Joined: 8:25 AM - Jun 22, 2006

12:52 AM - Feb 10, 2015 #2

Ive got a couple quite similar ones found in Iowa....I believe I was told they were primitive celts....made from chert.they are old I am pretty sure ..quite old.how old...????

I'd like to know more about stuff that's similar to that as well. Quills
" You can't stop the waves .... but, you can learn to surf."
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DavidMcAliley
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DavidMcAliley
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7:03 PM - Feb 10, 2015 #3

I've had people tell me it is a celt, a paleo dagger, an un-hafted knife blade, and a preform. From the flake pattern and the platform setups, I tend to lean toward preform, myself. There is something that just looks and feels unfinished about it. There are a couple of areas where platforms have been clearly set up to drive off thinning flakes, and the edges haven't been retouched or sharpened at all, that I can tell. I also have often wondered if this might be a "trade point" since it is of a type of stone that is definitely not native to the area. I had a fellow collector look at it years ago and he thought that was the most likely explanation and that it may have been sourced from out of state and packed in to trade for furs, shells from the coast, or some other such barter type goods. I've never had a professional archaeologist take a look at it, but I suppose that would probably give me a definitive answer.

One of the problems with finding things in fresh farm fields is that the plows ruin any chance of dating the artifacts by the layer. I have found fluted points similar to clovis/Dalton types in fields a few dozen yards from a nice woodland point with ears and serrations. The other downside is the obvious damage the plows cause. This one got out with just some light scraping, thankfully. I have a point that would have been an unbelievable museum quality piece with ears almost a half inch long and deep, even serrations along both sides. Unfortunately, the plow that turned it up also took one of the ears and a good portion of that side with it. That's part of the fun and the heartbreak of plow chasing, though.

One thing I've always wanted to do is scout out a good location either in the woods or along the very edge of one of the more productive fields in the area and conduct an amateur dig. The verges of the fields are often the least disturbed since that's where the tractors pull a U-turn to head back out on the next path, and I think it would be very informative to see what kind of layers of artifacts there are. I know for a fact that one field in the area at least had a work shop of sorts. I've pulled out more than two dozen river-rounded hammer stones, a couple of grinders (for grain, not points), and even a "paint pot" rock. I'd love to see what is in the area around that field that's protected by trees and undergrowth.
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