Help a pilgrim?

For Discussion concerning the construction and use of arrows and quivers.

Help a pilgrim?

BillOregon
Registered User
Joined: 14 Mar 2004, 00:00

18 Sep 2016, 17:51 #1

I was thinking there was a "Species that make good arrow shafts" sticky like the wood species for bows treatise. I'm not seeing one. Is there one?
I have had best results personally with red osier dogwood. My wild rose shoots all cracked on me.
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Thumper1945
Registered User
Joined: 14 Mar 2004, 11:48

19 Sep 2016, 14:51 #2

There is a list of arrow species on the arrow forum somewhere. Rose will check ( split) if you take bark off too soon.

Gary
"Your job is to ask how, my job is to see that you do the job yourself"
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Rod
Registered User
Joined: 17 Jun 2005, 23:07

19 Sep 2016, 17:30 #3

If there is one I'm not aware of it. A brief search of the archived stuff seems to show that arrow making tends to split into dowels, shoot shafts, bamboo shafts and livery shafts. I guess your best bet is to go to the archives and tutorials and see what you can find on shoot shafts.Maybe something we should open as a topic?
It's probably also worth searching here www.primitiveways.com
Rod.
It's meant to be simple, not easy.
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BillOregon
Registered User
Joined: 14 Mar 2004, 00:00

19 Sep 2016, 22:16 #4

Thanks fellas. I thought I remembered such a thread, but I have been on and off this forum since 2002, read and forgotten most of what is in the four Bowyer's Bibles and often forget to take my medication ... soooo I must be misremembering.
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Rod
Registered User
Joined: 17 Jun 2005, 23:07

21 Sep 2016, 00:48 #5

Bill,I think you'll find that there's a chapter in one of the Bowyer's Bibles that looks at shoot shafts in some detail. What grows where you live?


Rod.
It's meant to be simple, not easy.
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BillOregon
Registered User
Joined: 14 Mar 2004, 00:00

21 Sep 2016, 14:33 #6

Rod, I'm actually in a pretty good area with the Oregon coast range to the west and Cascades to the east. So there's red osier dogwood, ocean spray, hazel, et al. I just need to get out there and hustle some up and get it curing.
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Rod
Registered User
Joined: 17 Jun 2005, 23:07

18 Nov 2016, 16:14 #7

Best option in my neck of the woods (UK) would most likely be dogwood, though I did get a really good guelder rose switch from the inside of some hedgerow I was thinning out the other day.
Having said that if I got out more I would probably be able to find plenty of coppiced wood such as hazel. Once in a while I come across something that looks interesting and it gets cut and set aside, like a bullrush I cut years ago and forgot about until one day I found it and shot it through a chronograph and to my surprise it was accurate, fast and durable. Not bad for something that is 95% well seasoned pith with a thin casing of rind.

Rod.
Last edited by Rod on 18 Nov 2016, 16:28, edited 3 times in total.
It's meant to be simple, not easy.
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missalot
Registered User
Joined: 18 Oct 2009, 00:12

21 Nov 2016, 01:32 #8

I use dogwood (Red Osier) it is hard and is pretty easy to work.

Kevin
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Tapirchik
Registered User
Joined: 22 Mar 2013, 16:31

21 Nov 2016, 13:32 #9

I've tried ligustrum lucidum,(I live in Italy) that produces straight long branches and its wood is stiff and heavy
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Archeryrob
Registered User
Joined: 12 Feb 2003, 04:37

08 Dec 2016, 14:11 #10

This is a list of arrow materials for possible use I compiled years back.
https://boweyrsden.wordpress.com/2014/0 ... materials/
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Rod
Registered User
Joined: 17 Jun 2005, 23:07

08 Dec 2016, 23:07 #11

Thanks Rob, that's a useful and well presented list.


Rod.
It's meant to be simple, not easy.
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BillOregon
Registered User
Joined: 14 Mar 2004, 00:00

08 Dec 2016, 23:34 #12

Awesome list Rob. Rod, thanks for letting me know. I lost all my bookmarks a few weeks ago and have been reconstructing ...
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