Grean River Sheath project finished

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Grean River Sheath project finished

Firstwhitefalcon
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Firstwhitefalcon
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Joined: 19 Apr 2008, 02:35

09 Nov 2017, 21:47 #1

Project finished on sheath, so I made a belt also.
DSCN0835.JPG
DSCN0835.JPG
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Quillsnkiko
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Quillsnkiko
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Joined: 22 Jun 2006, 08:25

10 Nov 2017, 04:00 #2

Turned out Great!~! I like it. Quills
" You can't stop the waves .... but, you can learn to surf."
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Firstwhitefalcon
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Firstwhitefalcon
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10 Nov 2017, 17:37 #3

Thanks!
With knife in sheath.
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Michael Bootz
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Michael Bootz
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Joined: 21 Sep 2007, 16:23

11 Nov 2017, 11:38 #4

Nice one!
What did you use to dye the leather? I've used a commercial leather dye once and was pretty unimpressed - the leather looked and felt like plastic afterwards.
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Firstwhitefalcon
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Firstwhitefalcon
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11 Nov 2017, 13:45 #5

Fiebing's Leather Dye . But it takes 3 or 4 coats, and still isn't very even. Alternating direction with each coat. Then I go over it with neutral shoe polish and buff.
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beardedhorse
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beardedhorse
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13 Nov 2017, 21:38 #6

Firstwhitefalcon wrote: Fiebing's Leather Dye . But it takes 3 or 4 coats, and still isn't very even. Alternating direction with each coat. Then I go over it with neutral shoe polish and buff.
Nice job.  Can't see on back of sheath if a belt loop was sewn on.   The three rivet handle indicates a modern Green River knife.   Older, antique ones had five pins.   Nice treatment on narrower belt going into buckle and rest of belt the width of the buckle.   Fiebing;s leather dye doesn't look like plastic unless you finish with a spray or water based, acrylic sealer.  
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Firstwhitefalcon
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Firstwhitefalcon
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15 Nov 2017, 16:13 #7

beardedhorse wrote:
Firstwhitefalcon wrote: Fiebing's Leather Dye . But it takes 3 or 4 coats, and still isn't very even. Alternating direction with each coat. Then I go over it with neutral shoe polish and buff.
Nice job.  Can't see on back of sheath if a belt loop was sewn on.   The three rivet handle indicates a modern Green River knife.   Older, antique ones had five pins.   Nice treatment on narrower belt going into buckle and rest of belt the width of the buckle.   Fiebing;s leather dye doesn't look like plastic unless you finish with a spray or water based, acrylic sealer.  
DSCN7981.JPG
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Firstwhitefalcon
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Firstwhitefalcon
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15 Nov 2017, 16:15 #8

Same transition for buckle. Sheath ended up with 4 pieces of 7-8 oz leather. All hand stitched, but did have to drill holes for sewing.
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beardedhorse
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beardedhorse
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15 Nov 2017, 23:56 #9

Firstwhitefalcon wrote: Same transition for buckle. Sheath ended up with 4 pieces of 7-8 oz leather. All hand stitched, but did have to drill holes for sewing.
Thanks for showing the back side of the sheath.   Nice pattern to insure the sheath hangs at an angle for convenient, fast grip on the exposed knife scale (handle).   Also looked like you wet the sheath and form fit the leather around the wood handle.   Do you impress the groove rather than cutting one to have the stitching lay beneath the surface to prevent early wear?   I sometimes use a drill press rather than an awl or punch to get through multiple layers of leather.  I think you meant to spell Green River without the "a".   Mountaineers knew of a Green River in the Rockies in Utah rather than the John Russell factory on the Green River near Deerfield, Massachusetts.   Oftentimes  they mistakenly called their I. (John) Wilson butcher knives "green rivers" because of the GR stamped on them.   The GR stands for Georgius Rex - King George of England.   For rendezvous John Wilson knives are more common, authentic, documented and came from Sheffield, England.   We have no documentation of any Green River knife appearing at a pre 1840 Rocky Mountain rendezvous.    Green River, John Russell knives were very common, more affordable and well made and popular with the buffalo hunters in the decades after the last big organized rendezvous in 1840.
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Firstwhitefalcon
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Firstwhitefalcon
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29 Dec 2017, 15:53 #10

Thanks! I use a grooving tool for the stitch line and the imprint line. Thanks again!
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Beadman
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Beadman
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Joined: 04 Jan 2012, 15:30

08 Feb 2018, 21:58 #11

Very good work falcon.That'll last a lifetime.
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Firstwhitefalcon
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Firstwhitefalcon
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09 Feb 2018, 02:07 #12

Thank you!
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ateyo
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ateyo
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Joined: 11 Dec 2014, 21:30

09 Feb 2018, 15:49 #13

beardedhorse wrote:
Firstwhitefalcon wrote: Same transition for buckle. Sheath ended up with 4 pieces of 7-8 oz leather. All hand stitched, but did have to drill holes for sewing.
Thanks for showing the back side of the sheath.   Nice pattern to insure the sheath hangs at an angle for convenient, fast grip on the exposed knife scale (handle).   Also looked like you wet the sheath and form fit the leather around the wood handle.   Do you impress the groove rather than cutting one to have the stitching lay beneath the surface to prevent early wear?   I sometimes use a drill press rather than an awl or punch to get through multiple layers of leather.  I think you meant to spell Green River without the "a".   Mountaineers knew of a Green River in the Rockies in Utah rather than the John Russell factory on the Green River near Deerfield, Massachusetts.   Oftentimes  they mistakenly called their I. (John) Wilson butcher knives "green rivers" because of the GR stamped on them.   The GR stands for Georgius Rex - King George of England.   For rendezvous John Wilson knives are more common, authentic, documented and came from Sheffield, England.   We have no documentation of any Green River knife appearing at a pre 1840 Rocky Mountain rendezvous.    Green River, John Russell knives were very common, more affordable and well made and popular with the buffalo hunters in the decades after the last big organized rendezvous in 1840.
Just eavesdrpping on the history lesson, thanks! I like learning this stuff.

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Firstwhitefalcon
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Firstwhitefalcon
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09 Feb 2018, 17:00 #14

ateyo wrote:
beardedhorse wrote:
Firstwhitefalcon wrote: Same transition for buckle. Sheath ended up with 4 pieces of 7-8 oz leather. All hand stitched, but did have to drill holes for sewing.
Thanks for showing the back side of the sheath.   Nice pattern to insure the sheath hangs at an angle for convenient, fast grip on the exposed knife scale (handle).   Also looked like you wet the sheath and form fit the leather around the wood handle.   Do you impress the groove rather than cutting one to have the stitching lay beneath the surface to prevent early wear?   I sometimes use a drill press rather than an awl or punch to get through multiple layers of leather.  I think you meant to spell Green River without the "a".   Mountaineers knew of a Green River in the Rockies in Utah rather than the John Russell factory on the Green River near Deerfield, Massachusetts.   Oftentimes  they mistakenly called their I. (John) Wilson butcher knives "green rivers" because of the GR stamped on them.   The GR stands for Georgius Rex - King George of England.   For rendezvous John Wilson knives are more common, authentic, documented and came from Sheffield, England.   We have no documentation of any Green River knife appearing at a pre 1840 Rocky Mountain rendezvous.    Green River, John Russell knives were very common, more affordable and well made and popular with the buffalo hunters in the decades after the last big organized rendezvous in 1840.
Just eavesdrpping on the history lesson, thanks! I like learning this stuff.

Sent from my SM-T350 using Tapatalk
Thanks for the comment! The stitch grove is cut in.
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