Flemish strings

A forum for information related to bowstring making, materials, calculating weight, etc.
Roy Boggs
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Roy Boggs
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Joined: 25 Jul 2005, 07:08

15 Nov 2006, 20:21 #21

Sorry to detract from a good topic, but you guys have me fired up wanting to try linen for a bowstring - and I don't want to have to buy a huge roll from Pyro Supplies or wherever for just a few bowstrings.

Would anyone want to trade me some linen (or finished linen bowstring) for a stone arrowhead. I can make it from Knife River [brownish], Flint Ridge [pink heat treated], Texas [tan colored] or Kentucky Sonora [black] chert. Tell me the length/width you want. Will put side notches or corner notches. Thin base too. - Roy [Don't reply here!; email me - royATboggs.net]
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Juri
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Juri
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Joined: 27 Sep 2005, 05:24

15 Nov 2006, 20:57 #22

Rob. Humble apology for been so sceptic, Im beginning to trust you now.
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stoute longbows
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stoute longbows
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Joined: 06 Sep 2006, 21:34

17 Nov 2006, 11:12 #23

Inspired by Jaro's flemish string tutoral and discussion I tought what the hack, lets try a string with the individual treads not reverse twisted into a final cord but have the plies paralel the entire string. So I crept behind the spinning wheel and spun a couple of yards of hemp. When spinning as thin as possible I get about ten pounds per thread breaking strength. I wound 6 times between 2 nails, waxing entirely so that they do not slip. This 3 times. So eightteen treads in total. I made the string just as in this tutoral. But unfortunately, my results did not match those described here. The string broke almost inmediately. With all the individual threats running paralel so not twisted into the final string, each individual ply breaks at its weakest spot. This is very obvious from the break. Some parts are broken near the nock, others in the middle, so completely random. As I mentioned before, it is better to twist the final string by far then have the individual threads run paralel. I do have to mention that is is handspun material. The commercial stuf is probably more uniform. But twisting the final string does evenout any flaws in the orriginal material. So no more paralel strings for me .
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Juri
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Juri
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Joined: 27 Sep 2005, 05:24

17 Nov 2006, 20:56 #24

Ok, maybe now we are finally prepeared to read Tims article in a big book again and perhaps able to even understand something. Part II, chapter 8, pgs. 178 - 258.

One more thing. Pure beeswax is not the best choice for bowstrings, its too soft and sticky, however used in the knot area it prevents the timbers hitch for sliding. Much better and even more traditional way is to mix together beeswax and dammar resin 4:1. Resin makes the wax harder. Dammar is also a pure natural stuff, sold in artists equipment stores. Ready made mixture is sold in every archery store.
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Asiertxu
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Asiertxu
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Joined: 22 Feb 2006, 02:52

19 Nov 2006, 11:45 #25

Thanks Jaro....!!... ...

EXCELLENT thread indeed!!..... ...

Asier.

//Asier from Bilbao"BASQUE COUNTRY".
//Asier from Bilbao"BASQUE COUNTRY".
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