Flake blank

hada
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hada
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11:41 AM - Oct 06, 2016 #1

I was cleaning up so resent work and a few large wood struck flake blanks was among it. Making this was economic work .
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Indian Guide
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4:48 PM - Oct 06, 2016 #2

You found a beauty in that flake. The material is exceptional along with the chipping...
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Forager
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5:17 PM - Oct 06, 2016 #3

Nice work Glenn.  Must have felt and sounded good and right as it parted from the core.  A good thinning flake is better seen as a small-scale spall than debitage.


Keep that thing in a secure location if the big storm comes up this far - anything stronger than a stiff breeze will appropriate it from your possession.
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PeteDavis
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1:55 AM - Oct 07, 2016 #4

Proven strategy and beautiful point.

PD
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missalot
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12:47 PM - Oct 07, 2016 #5

Pete what is the material? The point looks great!

Kevin
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Hummingbird Point
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1:47 PM - Oct 07, 2016 #6

That's a damn fine piece.  Really big too, for a "flake point".  I love those ripples in the material.  That shows how mean it is!

Keith
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hada
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4:08 PM - Oct 07, 2016 #7

Thank you all. This just makes the chore of clen up a joyfull endeavor. Kevin the rock is rhyolite from Mt. kineo. Steve hope the winds don't blow to hard up our way. Just to be on the safe side I'll put this THINg in a Secure location. Keith I to love the ripple signature on these flakes. The pop when these release is distinct.
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Woodland Roamer
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11:31 PM - Oct 07, 2016 #8

That is a really fine piece from some tough stone. Must have been a really nice flake to start with. The material looks just like some of the porphyritic rhyolite in NC. It gets those ripples like you have there also.
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Forager
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12:32 AM - Oct 08, 2016 #9

I've enjoyed the opportunity to work some PA rhyolite and it rippled similarly... although I will admit to being partial toward the Mt Kineo rhyolite - it's visually attractive material, sings a beautifully clear note as it parts from the core and offers an encore when it hits the flake pile, and is (deceptively) as sharp as it is tough for a toolstone.

If a traditional knapper does not love such a stone, it is certainly among those to be favored.
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hada
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12:13 PM - Oct 08, 2016 #10

Thank you Woodland Roamer. Wooden billets with there wide contact platforms can drive very large potato skin flakes. These bi produces can result in sizeable tools. I looked up Rhyolite just to get a better understanding of it's make up in different locations. Some info from Wikipedia was entertaining to learn. It's the extrusive equivalent to granite. Occurrence in Europe Germany America Oceania and Asia. Eruptions are rare with only three in the last 20th. century. St. Andrew Strait Volcano in Papua New Guinea Novarupta volcano in Alaska and Chailten in southern Chillie. even a Ghost town here in the USA Rhyolite Nevada. I haven't worked any Pa. rhyolite it is supposed to be directional working better in one then the opposite.
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trapsetter1
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2:14 PM - Oct 08, 2016 #11

I have a ? what kind of wood are your billets made from and do you hit the platforms with the billet or is it indirect?also could you show a picture of them please?
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BrewerMo
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9:16 PM - Oct 08, 2016 #12

We have Rhyolite close to home from the Saint Francis Mountain area but I haven't given it a try yet. I might need to go hunting for some😊
Very nice! I like it alot.👍
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BrewerMo
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9:19 PM - Oct 08, 2016 #13

I did buy some stuff from a rock shop when I first started chipping. The guy called it Hickoryite (sp?) He said it was a Rhyolite from Mexico, if I remember right. It seemed real chalky to me and was a pink color.
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hada
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11:34 PM - Oct 08, 2016 #14

Brewermo the description sounds like it had a lot of prunce or volcanic ash this is only a assumption and we know what that leads to . I will try to post some set up work on this stone. A must and be set to spend a hour reading the Pete Davis Wood Thread! This is the holy grail and most concentrated source in the world on the use of wood PERIOD!!!! We here in tge eastern USA use flowering Dogwood as a Direct percussion tool. Jack Cresson a master archaeologist in this field stated to me the pink flowering seems to be better in Preformance. Fallowing his intuitive works we gain a better collective understanding. Wood is not only capable of Percussion but punch and pressure flaking play important roles .
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PeteDavis
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12:36 AM - Oct 09, 2016 #15

If you are not hung up on period correctness, american and english boxwoods make an unbelievable wood percussor.
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Forager
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1:34 AM - Oct 09, 2016 #16

PeteDavis wrote:
If you are not hung up on period correctness, american and english boxwoods make an unbelievable wood percussor.
This introduces an interesting dimension.  As a forager I'm glad for all of the introduced plants which have become naturalized, whether one might regard them as feral or legitimately wild.  They have served to expand the opportunities of my gathering for food and medicine, much as they did for the Post-Contact natives and this is an ethnohistoric fact.  

It certainly follows that technologically useful plants from abroad would most likely have been equally acceptable - and appropriated, had they been available to the makers of hardstone tools.  After all, such was the case for tobacco, squash, beans and especially corn... all migrants from what is now Mexico, Central America and even South America.  Trade in exotics was an old and common feature in prehistoric economies, and while period-specific replication is bound to the constraints of what is known from the archaeological and paleoethnobotanical record, the current casual practitioner should feel free to experiment with the materials available resulting from the Columbian Exchange... the Post-Contact natives had no problem with it nor did their ancestors hesitate to appropriate any useful or valuable introductions through trade or cultivation.


In the overarching economical limits of transformed and evolving habitats, peoples who live close to the earth continue to adapt to environmental changes and plant and animal species in order to flourish and thrive.  This is a story as old as our most distant ancestors from the Great Rift Valley in Africa and right up to the present throughout the planet.  


So the matter of  'correctness' only applies to the scientific methods of strict replication... for those outside of this narrow category who enjoy the pleasure of reducing geology's most unyielding toolstones with organic materials, there should be an unbridled freedom to experiment and discover what different woods would have been the envy of the Pre-Contact hardstone knappers of Broadspears.  How else will we know how better to improve our craft beyond the physical technique of our method? And thereby more specifically appreciate the skill and accomplishments of the Ancestors... and perhaps do what they might have done, had the different materials been available to them.
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hada
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2:10 AM - Oct 09, 2016 #17

A coluseum theater of archaeologists and anthropologists would bow to the statements you just made Steve. Uncannily You stand so protective on the great pyramid shadow castinging a traditional veiwpiont we all hold collectively. You all are my teachers my inspiration. With evey lithic detachment we grow stronger.
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