Fame Softening help

Moore77
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Moore77
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Joined: November 26th, 2017, 1:23 am

August 5th, 2018, 1:44 am #1

Hi all I need a little advise on building the frame for softening. I had back surgery back in November, and so it tough sometimes to bend  and I would like to build a frame I can use stand or in the siting position when my back is acting up. how big should I build this frame and what are some added features that make it easier on a person when softening hides. 
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paskinner
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paskinner
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Joined: March 24th, 2008, 5:52 pm

August 9th, 2018, 2:09 am #2

Hi, I don't really have experience with tanning with a disability, but I will pm you the info for someone who does. I think he can help you. You need to come up with a whole system that makes it easier on your body.
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beardedhorse
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beardedhorse
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Joined: March 27th, 2009, 6:35 am

August 10th, 2018, 1:41 am #3

Your frame size will depend on size of the hide and what is best position to work with the back injury.   I have bad shoulder and neck injury from auto collision and sit on a chair or buckets and hand stretch brained hide draped over a hitching post. Run it by your doctor or physical therapist before working.  You don't want to aggravate or prolong the healing of the back surgery.   Two by four boards for the sides of frame with 6 inch overlap on the ends and a half lap notch cut with router or radial arm saw with blade raised to half thickness of boards.  Make frame big enough to accommodate a variety of sizes of hides so you don't have to trim the hide to fit the frame.. Triangle shaped plywood braces screwed at the four corners will reinforce the bolted or screwed notched joints.    .  Many frame softening tanners use an axe handle, sharpened canoe paddle, dull wahintke (elk antler hide scraper) to stretch and squeegee the brained hide.  .  I lace up  myhide with paracord and a special hand made needle.  Paracord goes around the wood frame with no hooks on the hide or nails on the frame when frame softening.   I use nails around the periimeter of the frame when dry scraping off the hair, epidermis and hyperdermis.           You can use a vertical staking post whose height allows you to sit .   A post made tall enough for me to stand is what I have been using for years. One can drape the hide over it.   That way one doesn't have to support the weight of the hide and merely buff or slide the hide back and forth over the semi sharp end of the post.   There are three boards of oak sharpened and shaped like an axe head that is the top end of the post.   The bottom end is supported by 2 x 4s in an X shape.  I've used horse blinders on both sides of the framed hide and it almost looks like someone playing a harp when stretching the hide.   Tying hide to a trampoline and rolling a bowling ball will only stretch the hide a little and requires a lot of pulling on a cable.   Shooting baseballs into the framed hide with a baseball pitching machine is costly and can blow holes in the thinner portions. Not a recommended technique.        The topic of tanning with disabilities and a study of the bio mechanics of tanning to lessen or avoid over use and improper use injuries is worth pursuing.   Good luck on your tanning.  I invariably will take a hide to a steel cable to stretch stubborn posts or to prevent the crust that forms on the hair side from drying and stiffening.  Cabling may not be the best activity to do after back surgery.   ILook forward to getting information on tanning if one has limited mobility or strength issues.
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