Dutch Oven cooking

prairie gold
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prairie gold
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Joined: 4:14 PM - Oct 28, 2013

5:06 PM - Jul 19, 2014 #1

hubby and i were just  at the pennsylvania trappers convention last month sponsored by FTA, 'fur takers of america'...every year an older  couple does a class on cooking with dutch ovens...i know, not very paleo but.....someone in the crowd mentioned they heard about using wet grass to cook with if hot coals were not available....i gotta say, knowing how a pile of lawn clippings natually heats up, there's no doubt, a pile clippings covering a dutchie would cook a meal in a hurry! has anyone tried wet grass for cooking? doubt it would bring anything to a boil, but slow easy bake or warm-up food would certainly work me thinks!
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Abo
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Abo
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5:33 PM - Jul 19, 2014 #2

Ya thats compost cooking- It's a survival/on the run trick. You can dig a hole put in 6" of wet grass then you pot of food surrounded by grass and then 6" of wet grass on top, cover with dirt and punch a hole on top. The next day you'll have hot food with no smoke for anyone to see. Down side is no fast food. Better off with sushi! My girlfriend likes to store water for the horses in the winter in case the pipes freeze and we store water in garbage cans with lids surrounded by a mound of horse manure. The manure keeps the water from freezing. She can water the horse even if we don't have water.
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prairie gold
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prairie gold
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12:54 PM - Jul 21, 2014 #3

that's why we like our old cast iron tank heaters for our horses (and ex-dairy goat herd)...lite a fire once a day to keep it thawed out...even use one for a hot tub, but that takes allll day to get cold well water up to a hot soak temp!!
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igmuwatogla
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igmuwatogla
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1:11 AM - Sep 06, 2014 #4

Interesting, learn something new everyday.
The savage in man is never quite eradicated----Thoreau
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rokchipr
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rokchipr
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1:23 AM - Sep 06, 2014 #5

Compost pile can easily reach 160 F so it won't boil water but it can certainly get things warmed up. Kind of like a paleo crock pot slow cooker!
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caveman2533
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caveman2533
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3:27 AM - Sep 10, 2014 #6

Compost done wrong will catch fire, so there is ample opportunity for high temps.
Steve Nissly
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prairie gold
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prairie gold
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9:35 PM - Sep 10, 2014 #7

as is wet hay....testimony to all the barns and hay sheds that burn down due to hay not dry enough before baling!
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PaleoHQ
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PaleoHQ
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2:31 PM - Oct 21, 2014 #8

Interesting way to cook a meal, I never tried neither thought about that. I would like to know how it works.

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http://www.bestpaleocookbookhq.com/
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Quillsnkiko
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Quillsnkiko
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11:22 PM - Oct 21, 2014 #9

I know from experience a compost pile can be so hot you cannot stick you hand into it . and I've seen them smoke from the heat generated.
When I worked for a Goat Dairy in Wisconsin ...we put up green alfalfa- grass hay in the loft of his barn and had to salt down the layers of hay to prevent spontaneous combustion from the heating hay bales . Quills
" You can't stop the waves .... but, you can learn to surf."
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