Dust collection

A forum containing tutorials pertaining to bowmaking tools - their use, maintenance, etc.

Dust collection

rgsccr
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rgsccr
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Joined: 25 Nov 2005, 14:48

25 Nov 2005, 07:48 #1

How important is dust collection for the occasional bowyer working in an open air garage? At this point I have made a couple of bows in the last four months, and doubt that I will increase that pace by much.
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Adam
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Adam
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Joined: 16 Apr 2005, 18:03

26 Nov 2005, 21:17 #2

Really depends on the wood, if you are talking personal safety. You should wear a mask if working exotics, and for sure when using yew. Some people are also very dermatologically sensitive to wood dust.
Otherwise, collect and clean up the dust, or risk the wrath of an angry wife!:">
Sigh, been there....still sore.
Adam
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rgsccr
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rgsccr
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Joined: 25 Nov 2005, 14:48

26 Nov 2005, 23:26 #3

Thanks for the reply. What about yew makes it dangerous? So far I've made one yew bow with all of the work being done outside. By the way, is dust collection/protection more of an issue when you are using power tools such as a belt sander? Or is it just as important if you only use scrappers and the like?
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James Carmichael
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James Carmichael
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Joined: 27 Oct 2005, 02:50

29 Nov 2005, 14:01 #4

OK, long rant coming:

Long-term exposure to any wood dust particles in an enclosed space is bad. There's reams and reams on information on the net about dust collection and the hazards of inadequate collection (much of which makes my head hurt with measurements of static pressure, etc).

Self-bowyers probably are not at much risk, however, I use a DC simply for cleanliness as well. One of the worst-offending machines in a small shop is the bandsaw. When resawing wide boards, they produce incredible amounts of fine dust. Unfortunately, as stationary power tools go, consumer-grade 14" bandsaws usually have the least adequate DC porting.

A dust collector capable of moving at least 600 cubic feet per minute (CFM) catches close to 90% of the dust at the source when properly used, and is head & shoulders better than a shop vac (much quieter, too). 1HP and a 4" minimum inlet is normally required to get 600 CFM.

For specific woods, all tropicals are potentially dangerous, especially anything in the rosewood family.

Check this out:

www.sawmillcreek.org/show...hp?t=18571
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rgsccr
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rgsccr
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29 Nov 2005, 18:30 #5

Thanks James. I'll definitely consider your advice. The only power tool I have is a bandsaw (actually I don't have that for a while). Are you saying that a dust collector that concentrates on the bandsaw would be sufficient? Otherwise, all I am doing is scraping and final sanding.
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James Carmichael
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James Carmichael
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Joined: 27 Oct 2005, 02:50

29 Nov 2005, 18:51 #6

Health-wise, you're probably OK so long as you're not in an enclosed space for long periods. A DC sure is nice to have with the bandsaw, though. I installed a 4" port in the lower cabinet door of my Ridgid (most of the dust goes in or through the lower cabinet on a bandsaw) for my cheapie Cummins DC, and it sucks up most of the dust, don't have to vaccum out the cabinet nearly as often, unless I get lazy and don't use the DC. A DC is pretty much of a must-have for a jointer or planer.

Definitely wear some protection when working with tropicals, though, even with hand tools if they produce dust. This past winter I came down with a n-a-s-t-y case of bronchitis. It got so hard to breathe one night I nearly asked my wife to take me to the ER (and I hate hospitals). I had just built my first project with purpleheart before falling ill and later read PH dust often triggers bronchitis.

Lot's of folks may read this post and reply they've worked for years with tropicals and no problem, and it's no doubt true, but in some people, they can cause a very nasty reaction. In some cases, people have worked for years with rosewoods and others with no problem, then one day had a violent reaction to the dust.
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rgsccr
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rgsccr
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Joined: 25 Nov 2005, 14:48

29 Nov 2005, 23:00 #7

Thanks again.
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Hwarng
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Hwarng
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Joined: 18 Nov 2005, 07:07

02 Dec 2005, 03:19 #8

How is the deal with only hand tools? I have used rasps and scrapers and sandpaper. Materials I have worked on include lots of red oak, bamboo, some mulberry and some osage.
I try to do most of my work with the garage door open, ( i work in the garage).
Most of the time I do my fine sanding outside, so I think any breeze or anything could move the dust before I inhale it.
Do you people think I'll be fine?
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longshot38
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longshot38
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Joined: 21 Oct 2005, 23:20

28 Dec 2005, 14:12 #9

if you have concerns enough to ask then maybe you should have some protection for your piece of mind if nothing else.


dean
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